telegraph

telegraph.co.uk
Having a baby on Sherlock set made me 'less precious' about my acting, Benedict Cumberbatch says
Generations of actors may have lived by the rule “never work with children or animals”, but not so Benedict Cumberbatch.

Generations of actors may have lived by the rule “never work with children or animals”, but not so Benedict Cumberbatch.

The actor, a new father, has said working with a baby on the set of Sherlock actually improved his performance, stopping him from being too precious about his scenes.

Cumberbatch, who has one son with his wife Sophie Hunter and another baby on the way, said having a new infant colleague for the fourth series of Sherlock compelled the usual cast to work around the baby’s schedule.

The character is now known to be Rosamund, the newborn daughter of John and Mary Watson, played by Martin Freeman and Amanda Abbington.

Speaking ahead of the New Year’s Day episode, Cumberbatch said: “The babies have been pretty amazing.

“I’m a father and I know how difficult it is to get anything in tune with a baby’s schedule.

“It keeps you in the moment and it stops you being precious about your work.  

“I love those elements that make it more difficult.”

As is conventional in television, the one baby character will be played by several real-life babies, with filming taking place in between naps and feeds under close supervision.

When asked about the phrase “never work with children or animals” and whether it had proved true, Freeman added: “I would go along with that - the babies were pretty easy actually.

“The dog not so much.  I love dogs, I love animals and I love children but that adage comes about for a reason.

“Every time I read any script with loads of kids and animals I think we’ll remember that saying it is there for a reason.  

“When it works it’s joyous but getting it to work can be tricky.”

Cumberbatch said of his animal co-stars: “We had an interesting dog in the first episode.

“He was very sweet but was a bit afraid of being in the centre of town, afraid of too many people and not great on hard surfaces. “We were in Borough Market, with lots of people around, on concrete and tarmac.

“Cut to Amanda literally pulling a bloodhound around London who was supposed to pull her around London. That was fun.”

The fourth series of Sherlock starts on Sunday, January 1 at 8.30pm on BBC One.

Having a baby on Sherlock set made me ‘less precious’ about my acting, Benedict Cumberbatch says

18 DECEMBER 2016 • 9:00PM

Generations of actors may have lived by the rule “never work with children or animals”, but not so Benedict Cumberbatch.

The actor, a new father, has said working with a baby on the set of Sherlock actually improved his performance, stopping him from being too precious about his scenes.

Cumberbatch, who has one son with his wife Sophie Hunter and another baby on the way, said having a new infant colleague for the fourth series of Sherlock compelled the usual cast to work around the baby’s schedule.

The character is now known to be Rosamund, the newborn daughter of John and Mary Watson, played by Martin Freeman and Amanda Abbington.

Speaking ahead of the New Year’s Day episode, Cumberbatch said: “The babies have been pretty amazing.

“I’m a father and I know how difficult it is to get anything in tune with a baby’s schedule.

“It keeps you in the moment and it stops you being precious about your work.  

“I love those elements that make it more difficult.”

As is conventional in television, the one baby character will be played by several real-life babies, with filming taking place in between naps and feeds under close supervision.

When asked about the phrase “never work with children or animals” and whether it had proved true, Freeman added: “I would go along with that - the babies were pretty easy actually.

“The dog not so much.  I love dogs, I love animals and I love children but that adage comes about for a reason.

“Every time I read any script with loads of kids and animals I think we’ll remember that saying it is there for a reason.  

“When it works it’s joyous but getting it to work can be tricky.”

Cumberbatch said of his animal co-stars: “We had an interesting dog in the first episode.

“He was very sweet but was a bit afraid of being in the centre of town, afraid of too many people and not great on hard surfaces. “We were in Borough Market, with lots of people around, on concrete and tarmac.

“Cut to Amanda literally pulling a bloodhound around London who was supposed to pull her around London. That was fun.”

The fourth series of Sherlock starts on Sunday, January 1 at 8.30pm on BBC One.

(via Having a baby on Sherlock set made me 'less precious’ about my acting, Benedict Cumberbatch says)

Birana is now a model

We got a new name and occupation from the Telegraph to laugh at:

Louis Tomlinson has joined his other four former One Direction bandmates in taking on a solo career. The Sun reports that the 24-year-old has been working on solo material with a view to releasing it on Syco, Simon Cowell’s label and the company that created One Direction.

It was originally thought that Tomlinson would be headed for a television career, and was rumoured to be taking a spot on the judging panel of the X Factor. The singer also fathered a child with his ex-girlfriend, US model Birana Jungwirth, in January.

To be fair, they did mention his label, so there’s that (even though neither “signing” is confirmed).

Tomlinson has also been nurturing his record label, signing a teen girlband and 2014 X Factor finalist Jack Walton.

6

Helena Bonham Carter playing the role of George WIlmers from the BBC’s TV Mini-Series Love, Nina | 2016.


‘Helena Bonham Carter was cast in a TV series about my life - and all I could do was blag a Harry Potter ticket from her,' 

“I hear her say, ‘I’m having tea with Nina, the Nina.’ Then she covers the mouthpiece and says, ‘My mother says to tell you she loved the book.’  HBC wants to talk about MK and asks lots of questions, even though the series isn’t going in for straight impressions.

‘What sort of animal would Mary-Kay be?’ she asks. I say she probably wouldn’t be an animal. HBC says she realises that, but if she was. So I say, ‘Cat, probably.’ HBC doesn’t look convinced. I think again.‘Goldfinch,’ I say, and we laugh at my overthinking it and HBC says a cat is fine.

HBC wants to know about Mary-Kay’s romantic life. ‘Boyfriends and whatnot,’ she says, sounding exactly like Mary-Kay.”

Snippets of an article by Nina Stibbe about her meeting with HBC to discuss the role she was to play, Mary-Kay Wilmers | Telegraph 20/05/16.

telegraph.co.uk
On the trail of Patrick Leigh Fermor in Greece's most savagely beautiful corner

In the corner of travel writer Patrick Leigh Fermor’s book-lined study, which is still pretty much left as if the man himself had popped out for a quick swim across the Hellespont, I came across a stack of papers. The top envelope included a long, rambling letter from a woman from Leamington Spa, which managed to be both breezy and beseeching.

In it, she wrote how she’d been sad to miss him the other day; how she hoped that his wife hadn’t been bored by her rattling on about her travels when she’d come knocking on the door; and how she’d included some of her jottings about Albania, which she hoped he would read.

“Did he get many such visitors?” I asked Elpida, Leigh Fermor’s housekeeper during his latter years, who was keeping an eye on us as we ranged through the house. “Oh, yes. They would come barging in, mostly without any appointment. So I would have to pretend he was ill or not there, which could be embarrassing if he suddenly appeared.”

Such shameless gatecrashing is downright rude, but then we were not that dissimilar, poking around among his effects, noting the separate bedrooms, and asking what he’d had for breakfast (“toast with marmalade and Gentleman’s Relish”). But at least we were there posthumously. And, frankly, if Leigh Fermor were still alive today, I’d have probably passed him a few of my jottings, too.

youtube

Here is another cool music video from season two, featuring Katie Herzig and her beautiful “Telegraph Song”!

Nikola Tesla's 'World System.'

The ‘World-System’ is based on the application of the following important inventions and discoveries:

1. The ‘Tesla Transformer.’ This apparatus is in the production of electrical vibrations as revolutionary as gunpowder was in warfare. Currents many times stronger than any ever generated in the usual ways, and sparks over one hundred feet long, have been produced by the inventor with an instrument of this kind.

2. The ‘Magnifying Transmitter.’ This is Tesla’s best invention — a peculiar transformer specially adapted to excite the Earth, which is in the transmission of electrical energy what the telescope is in astronomical observation. By the use of this marvelous device he has already set up electrical movements of greater intensity than those of lightning and passed a current, sufficient to light more than two hundred incandescent lamps, around the Globe.

3. The ‘Tesla Wireless System.’ This system comprises a number of improvements and is the only means known for transmitting economically electrical energy to a distance without wires. Careful tests and measurements in connection with an experimental station of great activity, erected by the inventor in Colorado, have demonstrated that power in any desired amount can be conveyed, clear across the Globe if necessary, with a loss not exceeding a few per cent.

4. The ‘Art of Individualization.’ This invention of Tesla is to primitive ‘tuning’ what refined language is to unarticulated expression. It makes possible the transmission of signals or messages absolutely secret and exclusive both in the active and passive aspect, that is, non-interfering as well as non-interferable. Each signal is like an individual of unmistakable identity and there is virtually no limit to the number of stations or instruments which can be simultaneously operated without the slightest mutual disturbance.

5. ‘The terrestrial Stationary Waves.’ This wonderful discovery, popularly explained, means that the Earth is responsive to electrical vibrations of definite pitch just as a tuning fork to certain waves of sound. These particular electrical vibrations, capable of powerfully exciting the Globe, lend themselves to innumerable uses of great importance commercially and in many other respects.

The first ‘World-System’ power plant can be put in operation in nine months. With this power plant it will be practicable to attain electrical activities up to ten million horsepower and it is designed to serve for as many technical achievements as are possible without due expense. Among these the following may be mentioned:

(1) The inter-connection of the existing telegraph exchanges or offices all over the world;

(2) The establishment of a secret and non-interferable government telegraph service;

(3) The inter-connection of all the present telephone exchanges or offices on the Globe;

(4) The universal distribution of general news, by telegraph or telephone, in connection with the Press;

(5) The establishment of such a ‘World-System’ of intelligence transmission for exclusive private use;

(6) The inter-connection and operation of all stock tickers of the world;

(7) The establishment of a ‘World-System’ of musical distribution, etc.;

(8) The universal registration of time by cheap clocks indicating the hour with astronomical precision and requiring no attention whatever;

(9) The world transmission of typed or handwritten characters, letters, checks, etc.;

(10) The establishment of a universal marine service enabling the navigators of all ships to steer perfectly without compass, to determine the exact location, hour and speed, to prevent collisions and disasters, etc.;

(11) The inauguration of a system of world-printing on land and sea;

(12) The world reproduction of photographic pictures and all kinds of drawings or records.

(“My Inventions V – The Magnifying Transmitter.” Electrical Experimenter, June, 1919.)