tehan

Freedom
  • GLEESON CJ:What do you mean by “free choice”?
  • TEHAN QC:What we mean by “free choice”, your Honour, is a choice unconstrained by any pressure, hope of advantage or benefit or force or coercion or compulsion, a true free choice.
  • GLEESON CJ:You would be surprised to know that there are places I would rather be than here at the moment and the psychiatrists might explain my presence at the moment by reference to a number of influences or pressures that produce that consequence, but I thought I was here as a result of a free choice. How is that consistent with your
  • explanation?
  • HAYNE J:Good luck, Mr Tehan.
  • TEHAN QC:It is always a matter of degree, your Honour.
  • KIRBY J:I could not think of a better place to be than here.
  • GLEESON CJ:I am sure that is probably right.
  • SOURCE:Tofilau, Marks, Hill & Clarke v The Queen [2007] HCATrans 81
Widjak-Seruni#1

“Ngeliatin apa? Galak banget.” Didi muncul dari belakang Widjak. Sepupunya itu sedang menatap sesuatu dengan tak suka. Didi pun mendekat. Ia pun melihat obyek yang dilihat Widjak. Seorang bocah tak dikenal bermain dengan pesawat-pesawatan yang dilayangkan pendek. Akibatnya, moncong pesawat menabrak ranting teh-tehan yang memagari taman kafe Widjak. Tabrakan antar pesawat dengan teh-tehan itu terjadi berkali-kali. Widjak yang mendesain taman sekaligus ikut turun tangan saat penanaman, menjadi gemas. Kalau bocah itu saudaranya, sudah pasti berakhir dengan tangisan. Apa daya sekarang. Bocah itu salah seorang pelanggannya. Dan, pelanggan adalah raja. “Sabaar. Atau kamu mau aku menanganinya?” Didi menggulung lengan sweaternya. Tapi, sosok lain sudah lebih dulu mendekati si bocah. “Yaaaah. Pesawatnya jatuh.” Seorang gadis berlesung pipit mengambil pesawat yang tersungkur di atas rumput. Tangan sang bocah menggapai-gapai pesawatnya yang ditahan perempuan itu. “Radja ingat nggak pernah ke sini sebelumnya? Dulu kan kita pernah ke sini, waktu pohonnya masih kecil. Segininya Radja.” Tangan gadis itu menangkupkan tangannya di depan lutut Radja. “Sekarang sudah tinggi, ya nggak? Itu artinya, pohon ini hidup, seperti Radja. Radja juga bertambah tinggi kan? Nah, kalau Radja dilempari pesawat ini, sakit nggak?” Bocah itu terlihat bertatapan dengan perempuan cantik. “Sakit ya? Nah, mainannya pindah yuk! Jangan diterbangin ke pohon, kasihan sakit. Kita ke sana, yuk!” Bocah itu dan gadis berlalu. “Yaaah. Nggak jadi deh. Kalau sama aku pasti nurut juga.” “Eh Di, bantuin aku ini aja, bantuin aku cari tahu nama dia.” “Eee…. Serius?”

Merit in cutting tax brackets: Lib MP

A government backbencher has floated the idea of reducing personal income tax brackets from five to three.

Liberal MP Dan Tehan said Australia faces a choice between the status quo or continuing economic reform to reduce marginal rates impacting on average weekly earnings by reducing direct taxation in favour of indirect taxation.

“The problem is that for average and lower income workers they are already slowly bleeding,” he writes in Fairfax Media on Friday.

Five tax brackets exist now: zero, 19 cents, 32.5 cents, 37 cents and 45 cents in the dollar.

Mr Tehan pointed to the Henry Review which identified potential gains in shifting to three brackets with most income earners in a single bracket of 35 per cent, a higher tax bracket for those earning over $180,000 and a tax-free bracket for those earning under $25,000.

“Only tax reform that includes all options allows us to address the major flaws in our tax system, particularly bracket creep,” the MP said.

Unless people were earning more than $180,000, bracket creep would mean inflation and wage rises would slowly push Australians into higher tax brackets.

Workers earning the average annual wage of $80,000 would see every dollar earned over that amount taxed at 37 cents.

“With no changes, in seven years these average earners might be earning 30 per cent more in wages but end up paying 50 per cent more in tax,” he said.

Shadow Treasurer Chris Bowen said Mr Tehan’s was one of a “cacophony” of ideas being floated by Liberal MPs.

“Liberal MPs are all over the shop when it comes to tax,” he told ABC radio.

Mr Bowen said Mr Tehan has not said how his proposal would be funded.

“Of course the obvious way to pay for it is increasing the GST and you know where (Labor) stands on that.”

Finance Minister Mathias Cormann said it was the government’s intention to provide tax cuts.

“Obviously our commitment always is when we pursue policy change like that we need to do the hard yards to identify how we would pay for it,” he told Sky News.

Greens leader Richard Di Natale said Mr Tehan’s idea would simply exacerbate income inequality.

“We have huge concerns about a proposal that would effectively cause an increase in the gap between the super-rich and ordinary people,” he told AAP.

Merit in cutting tax brackets: Lib MP

A government backbencher has floated the idea of reducing personal income tax brackets from five to three.

Liberal MP Dan Tehan said Australia faces a choice between the status quo or continuing economic reform to reduce marginal rates impacting on average weekly earnings by reducing direct taxation in favour of indirect taxation.

“The problem is that for average and lower income workers they are already slowly bleeding,” he writes in Fairfax Media on Friday.

Five tax brackets exist now: zero, 19 cents, 32.5 cents, 37 cents and 45 cents in the dollar.

Mr Tehan pointed to the Henry Review which identified potential gains in shifting to three brackets with most income earners in a single bracket of 35 per cent, a higher tax bracket for those earning over $180,000 and a tax-free bracket for those earning under $25,000.

“Only tax reform that includes all options allows us to address the major flaws in our tax system, particularly bracket creep,” the MP said.

Unless people were earning more than $180,000, bracket creep would mean inflation and wage rises would slowly push Australians into higher tax brackets.

Workers earning the average annual wage of $80,000 would see every dollar earned over that amount taxed at 37 cents.

“With no changes, in seven years these average earners might be earning 30 per cent more in wages but end up paying 50 per cent more in tax,” he said.

Shadow Treasurer Chris Bowen said Mr Tehan’s was one of a “cacophony” of ideas being floated by Liberal MPs.

“Liberal MPs are all over the shop when it comes to tax,” he told ABC radio.

Mr Bowen said Mr Tehan has not said how his proposal would be funded.

“Of course the obvious way to pay for it is increasing the GST and you know where (Labor) stands on that.”

Finance Minister Mathias Cormann said it was the government’s intention to provide tax cuts.

“Obviously our commitment always is when we pursue policy change like that we need to do the hard yards to identify how we would pay for it,” he told Sky News.

Greens leader Richard Di Natale said Mr Tehan’s idea would simply exacerbate income inequality.

“We have huge concerns about a proposal that would effectively cause an increase in the gap between the super-rich and ordinary people,” he told AAP.

The Missing Startup Recovery - Real Time Economics

Y Combinator, based in Mountain View, Calif., has helped launch roughly 900 companies. A decline in startup has been a puzzle for economists and a potential roadblock for economic growth.  PATRICK TEHAN/TNS/ZUMA PRESS America’s entrepreneurs still hadn’t regained their foot…

http://bit.ly/1nQdMFC

#Economy

Information Society

Leave GST as it is: Liberal MP

A federal Nationals MP is worried she may lose her marginal Queensland seat if the Turnbull government raises the GST.

Michelle Landry says small businesses in her electorate of Capricornia have contacted her with concerns about a rise to 15 per cent.

“I’d prefer to see the GST stay as it is and maybe look at some other avenues with the tax reform,” she told ABC radio on Friday.

But Liberal MP Ken Wyatt believes public opinion is still developing on the issue.

“Actually people have been coming up (to me) saying ‘we have got to do the tax reform’,” he said.

“I’ve had a couple of people that said the GST has to be factored in.”

Treasurer Scott Morrison has said the government is yet to make a decision about how it will shake up the tax system.

Liberal MP Dan Tehan made the case for tax reform.

“Reform may be hard but the status quo will lead to higher taxes for average earners and long-term economic decline,” he wrote in Fairfax Media.

Income taxes were punishing workers through bracket creep and deterring people on welfare getting into work.

Quoting former Treasury secretary Martin Parkinson, the MP said doing nothing would mean “we would be sleepwalking into a real mess”.

Shadow Treasurer Chris Bowen said it’s telling that a lot of Liberal MPs were saying don’t increase the GST because we want to win out seats, not because it was bad for the country.

“What’s very clear is that the Liberal Party is at war with itself on this issue,” he told ABC radio.

The Missing Startup Recovery
External image
Combinator, based in Mountain View, Calif., has helped launch roughly 900 companies. A decline in startup has been a puzzle for economists and a potential roadblock for economic growth. PATRICK TEHAN/TNS/ZUMA PRESS

America’s entrepreneurs still hadn’t regained their footing six years after the recession ended, a troubling sign for an economy that once counted on fast-growing startups for employment and ideas.

A new report by the Labor Department shows 232,000 establishment “births” in the second quarter of 2015, a slight decline from the prior quarter. Those accounted for 831,000 jobs.

As a share of the overall labor market, the number of jobs attributed to such births has fallen noticeably since before the recession, from about 12.5% of the total to a little more than 11%. Commerce Department data, which isn’t as current but reaches back to the 1970s, shows the trend stretching back decades.

External image

Overall, of course, the economy has been adding jobs at a steady clip. Opening and expanding private-sector establishments added a seasonally adjusted 7.6 million jobs while those contracting and closing shed 6.7 million during the second quarter of 2015, the Labor Department said. All together, there was a net gain of 829,000 in the three-month span. Every sector except natural resources and mining added jobs.

But the apparent loss of dynamism—the decline of startups—has been a puzzle for economists and a potential roadblock for economic growth. The creation and destruction of companies and jobs should, at least in theory, make way for new technology and innovation, allow people to better match their skills to openings and boost productivity.

The significant decline of high-growth young firms in the tech sector could be particularly problematic.

But the cause remains elusive. Credit constraints, investment in machines rather than labor, outsourcing, regulations and demographics all could be factors.

John Haltiwanger, an economics professor at the University of Maryland, has written extensively on the topic. In an August 2015 research paper, he noted:

Startups and young firms have disproportionately contributed to job creation and been key sources of innovation and experimentation. From this perspective, the declines in dynamism and fluidity would appear to have adverse consequences. However, it could be that shifts in the business model and changes in the way that workers build careers imply that job creation, productivity and earnings growth can be achieved without such a high pace of worker and job reallocation.

Related reading:

What Happened to the Breakout Startup?

Why It Matters That New Businesses Are Creating Jobs More Slowly Than a Decade Ago

Starting a Business is Easy (for Harvard Business Grads)



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blogs.wsj.com
[WSJ] The Missing Startup Recovery
External image
Combinator, based in Mountain View, Calif., has helped launch roughly 900 companies. A decline in startup has been a puzzle for economists and a potential roadblock for economic growth.  PATRICK TEHAN/TNS/ZUMA PRESS

America’s entrepreneurs still hadn’t regained their footing six years after the recession ended, a troubling sign for an economy that once counted on fast-growing startups for employment and ideas.

A new report by the Labor Department shows 232,000 establishment “births” in the second quarter of 2015, a slight decline from the prior quarter. Those accounted for 831,000 jobs.

As a share of the overall labor market, the number of jobs attributed to such births has fallen noticeably since before the recession, from about 12.5% of the total to a little more than 11%. Commerce Department data, which isn’t as current but reaches back to the 1970s, shows the trend stretching back decades.

External image

Overall, of course, the economy has been adding jobs at a steady clip. Opening and expanding private-sector establishments added a seasonally adjusted 7.6 million jobs while those contracting and closing shed 6.7 million during the second quarter of 2015, the Labor Department said. All together, there was a net gain of 829,000 in the three-month span. Every sector except natural resources and mining added jobs.

But the apparent loss of dynamism—the decline of startups—has been a puzzle for economists and a potential roadblock for economic growth. The creation and destruction of companies and jobs should, at least in theory, make way for new technology and innovation, allow people to better match their skills to openings and boost productivity.

The significant decline of high-growth young firms in the tech sector could be particularly problematic.

But the cause remains elusive. Credit constraints, investment in machines rather than labor, outsourcing, regulations and demographics all could be factors.

John Haltiwanger, an economics professor at the University of Maryland, has written extensively on the topic. In an August 2015 research paper, he noted:

Startups and young firms have disproportionately contributed to job creation and been key sources of innovation and experimentation. From this perspective, the declines in dynamism and fluidity would appear to have adverse consequences. However, it could be that shifts in the business model and changes in the way that workers build careers imply that job creation, productivity and earnings growth can be achieved without such a high pace of worker and job reallocation.

Related reading:

What Happened to the Breakout Startup?

Why It Matters That New Businesses Are Creating Jobs More Slowly Than a Decade Ago

Starting a Business is Easy (for Harvard Business Grads)

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Build A Budget Calculator | ClearPoint Credit Counseling (CCCS)
Build a budget with this free and easy to use budget calculator. The tool allows you to input and track a wide variety of monthly expenses from housing to transportation, to entertainment.

“Learning to live within your means is a simple matter of spending less than you make. For most consumers, that means cutting back. It does not mean doing without.

There are dozens of ways to reduce your monthly expenses without crimping your lifestyle.

And above all else, stop trying to keep up with the Joneses. Your neighbors with the latest clothes and luxury cars may be drowning in debt, and while you may not sport a designer watch, you will be able to sleep at night.

“Being in control of your finances not only saves you money, but it also makes you a more financially secure person and family,” - Tehan.