teenage junkie

It was as if I had forgotten how to live a normal life, I only knew how to live the life of a teenage drug addict.
—  realizations about my life and struggle with heroin addiction.
Poe junkie

The cold of London is forgotten in the glow of a lighter,
It is all you do to kill the grey,
Numb at the tips and you flick it right up,
And a dead man they say,
as you get High another day,
Just a drag to a smile, its chocolate.

Just a dab you use it,
Get high to get calm,
Paranoia but you do it,
Sweet lies its all like chocolate

You and your friends call it chocolate,
The lyrics of the song called it fate,
Roll up and strum the strings, chocolate to forget,
Dead inside and sad soaked futile hate,
You bite her lips, taste like wine and chocolate,
You call it chocolate, just a lie; you dead?

Your lungs they take it in like a friend,
Your heart breaks again, remember why you like it?
She broke your heart so you broke your head,
Bent with drags of chocolate, loved her but she didn’t know,
Bite your lips, light it up and inhale your fate

Inspired by the 1975 chocolate and my own addiction and self destruction

Amity Park’s kids having the most disturbingly dulled sense of danger tho

like someone climbs onto the school roof to get a football and the teacher’s freak out and they’re like, bruh chill I’ve climbed shit taller than this to get out of range from a ghost fight, someone burns their hand on a bunsen burner in science class and the teacher is freaking out and rushing them to the sink to run it under water and the student’s just like, tbh it’s not that bad I got skimmed by an ectoblast once that was way worse

kids standing there filming ghost fights and laughing when they almost get hit by a fucKING CAR, little kids never fearing the monster under their bed or in their closet because all the monsters are more likely to be found on the streets

the number of reckless teenagers becoming adrenalin junkies skyrockets, daily life has become so full of casual danger that they start to miss it when the ghosts take a day off, teenagers unknowingly getting addicted to the thrill the ghost fights bring to their lives

a store gets held up at gunpoint and the young jaded employee is just like, I literally ran a gigantic ghost wolf out of here with a broom last week I really don’t give a shit, horror movie and video game jump scares don’t do shit for these kids, girls walk around town in the middle of the night hardly fearing their safety because if they can successfully run away from a huge ghost tiger they can run away from some back alley creep

kids barely glance either way when crossing the roads because they’re so used to noticing things from the corner of their eyes, games of ‘truth or dare’ become games of 'dare or gtfo’

just kids who’ve grown up in this town knowing all the nurses at Amity hospital by name because if they’re not in there from a ghost fight it’s because they tried to ride their skateboard off a roof into a pool because 'a ghost dropped me from three storeys high into a lake once and it was awesome’

What starts out as an already-fascinating look at the ways technology may be destroying the lives of Chinese youth Web Junkie quickly becomes something more.  To combat what authorities deem the greatest social crisis for youth today, the Chinese government has created treatment facilities to detox and cure teenagers of their addictions to online life.  As the unorthodox psychological sessions continue and the teenage boys begin to share with their parents the reasons why they feel more connected to disassociated voices in cyberspace than to their families, Web Junkie chronicles the results of a nation going through one of most drastic transformations in human history.

In honest and wrenching ways that transcend national borders, this film is a thoughtful examination of a society in flux and a technology-addled generation on the precipice of an unknown future. 

Directors Shosh Shlam and Hilla Medalia premiered their documentary during the 2014 Sundance Film Festival and it’s currently playing in LA and expands to select cities in October.

Film stills by Hilla Medalia and Miao Wang