teen doom

DC Superhero Teams Summed Up

Justice Society of America: Superhero Retirement Home Serves As A School House For Youngsters

Justice League: Pillars of Society Form Superhero Team Too Big To Fail

Teen Titans: Local Teens Demand Respect, A Place To Angst, and Food

Outsiders: Batman Dragoons Nobodies To Fight Crime Due To Spite

Green Lantern Corps: Space Cops Stop Themselves From Becoming A Space Dictatorship

Secret Six: Shit People, Shit Work Effort, Shit Results, But Still A Good Family

Shadowpact: Magical Bar Flies

Justice League Dark: Kinky People Meet Up Each Friday To Fight Demons

Justice League International: Idiots Team Up To Solve International Incidents

Legion of Superheroes: Local Teens Demand Respect, A Place To Angst, and Food, IN THE FUTURE

Gotham Knights (Detective Comics Team): Leather Wearing Furries Obesse About A Hellhole

Justice League of America (Rebirth Team): Batman Dragoons A Bunch of Misfits For Reality TV Drama and To Combat International Affairs 

Suicide Squad: A Bunch Of Villains Are Held Hostage By A Psychopath That Makes Them Look Good In Comparison

Doom Patrol: Weirdos Gather To Ponder The Meaning Of The Universe

Young Justice: Pre-Teens Trade The Treehouse In Their Backward For A Cave

Earth 2 Justice Society: Hot Young People Fight Crime In The World Created By Both A Godlike Planet and A Magical Box

Infinity Inc: Local Teens Demand Respect, A Place To Angst, and Food, In A Parallel Universe

Super Sons: Two Kids Resist The Urge To Murder Each Other

New Gods: Everyone is an Asshole Except Mister Miracle, Big Barda, and Bug The Forager

wistingman  asked:

You once stated the Fantastic Four were the actual best super team. Why is that?

Assuming there’s even a nominal need to explain it any further than “they were Jack Kirby’s main project for just shy of a decade,” or for that matter “it’s the team Ben Grimm’s on” or “they’re where Doctor Doom comes from,” it’s actually a little more complicated than it might seem, because it’s not quite a matter of them collectively being the best characters in comics. Ben’s right up there, and Reed’s great too in the right hands, but Johnny’s while fun still pretty one-note, and while Sue works in the context of the group, I still feel like after all these years people haven’t quite fully fleshed out her deal in the same way as the others. Pound-for-pound, they hardly match up to the Justice League. But a team is a lot more than the sum of its parts; it’s the dynamic, the context they’re framed in, and the scope of what you can do with them. And in those regards, no one else is even close.

Let’s cover the other major players. I like the Doom Patrol from what I’ve read (Morrison’s run and what there’s been so far of Way’s), but they seem really shifty in terms of lineup in spite of being a small group, making it tougher to build long-term stories around character dynamics, and most of their adventures seem to be them just trying to wrap their minds around what’s happening to them; like the Spirit, they’re the spectators, not the spectacle. The X-Men are…a whole piece in and of themselves, but long story short, as far as I’m concerned they’ve spent over 30 years coasting on a run that got by on trying *slightly* harder than its competition at the time and a strong if muddled central metaphor, with any attempts at doing anything actually interesting with them since then smothered as soon as they start to gather any steam. Ditto Teen Titans, without even the symbolic strength of the central concept; all they’ve got is the cartoon, and DC’s spent over a decade resolutely making sure absolutely none of what made that show work gets into the comics. The JSA is Fine, Just Fine, and Jay Garrick and Ted Knight are both great, but their integration into the main DCU was - aside from scrapping the multiverse - the biggest mistake DC ever made in terms of large-scale continuity reengineering, and aside from the pretty clearly failed Earth-2, everything with them for the last 30 years has been built on the back of that illusion that any of them are in any way anywhere near as important as Superman or Batman. I’ll cop the Legion of Superheroes might have more meat on the bone than I’ve seen, but I’m not willing to shell out however many thousands of dollars on archive editions I’d need to find out, and while I imagine the Defenders were great under Steve Gerber, that seems to have largely been it for them.

That leaves the big two. I’ve covered it before, so keeping it relatively short: the Justice League is the best team in terms of average character quality so long as we’re sticking to the Big Seven model, but because each of them is iconic and important enough that they all have their own stuff going on, the focus in their best runs is on big action, with character work necessarily taking a back seat. They try to shake it up sometimes with B-listers, presumably on the basis that that’s how the League was conceived of in the first place, but it never works; the minor characters in the beginning were elevated to the A-list by sheer dint of being on Superman and Batman and Wonder Woman’s team, and shortly afterwards the rules of that world and who was important in it were codified enough that you couldn’t really replicate that more than once in a blue moon with one or two characters. The Avengers meanwhile were originally more genuine B-listers - only truly elevated above that by the movies, or if you’re being generous Bendis - and as such the Avengers as a group was the most significant thing in any individual members’ life, turning it into a meaningful institution that made them more than the sum of their parts, while the Justice League has always been less than the sum of its own. But at the same time, while they can do more within the boundaries of being the big team than their distinguished competition, they themselves just aren’t as big a team, and can’t compete on those grounds. Maybe I’d have a different mindset if the Avengers were a big deal to me personally, but as far as the ‘classic’ members go, I maybe, generously, care about four or five of them at all.

The Fantastic Four on the other hand? For starters, they’re a pretty universally regarded perfect balance of powers and personalities - tough enough to get into some wild adventures but not so overwhelmingly so that they can’t be easily thrown in over their heads; arranged character-wise with personality quirks both complimentary and irreconcilable that let you just as easily show them hugging it out or at each others throats. But the deal-maker is that rather than a club, or a gathering of the big guns when they have time off from their solo adventures, or an after-school hangout, or a strikeforce, or a ragtag bunch of misfits, or about 938 backup dancers of varying degrees of quality lucky enough to have Wolverine and Emma Frost to carry them, they’re a family, both born and found, and moreover they’re a family of explorers. And that makes all the difference.

Obviously there’re other teams that work as families in reality or in spirit, but the FF work that way in terms of dynamic, even above their status as superheroes. Yes, if they hear about the Mad Thinker wrecking downtown they’ll go deal with that, so you can tell regular superhero stories with them. But at the same time, you don’t need any elaborate explanation to get them to the Savage Land or the Negative Zone, or even to Yancy Street; they’re as likely as not to head out there on vacation (or to stop Ben from tearing it down in the latter case). They’ll go do big, interesting things purely on the basis of going to do it together as a family, and when it’s a family that diverse in terms of interests and personal goals, that means you can organically throw them in a bunch of different directions. And because they’re science adventurers above all with superheroics as just one option on the table, that gives you all the justification needed to dish out any wild high concepts you like, on the simple basis that Reed’s interested and the rest will humor him if it means a fun afternoon. And when real danger finds them, they care for each other and argue with each other and worry about each other and keep each other on their feet the way family does, perpetually keeping the emotional stakes as high as possible.

So yeah. They play off each other perfectly, you can justify them going nearly anywhere and doing nearly anything, and at their heart they have the warmth and the bickering and the strength that comes with family. And Kirby threw everything he had at them, and they have Ben Grimm and fight Doctor Doom. That’s why they’re the best. And among Marvel’s myriad other problems at the moment, its world is always going to be the lesser and the lonelier for it whenever it’s missing The World’s Greatest Comics Magazine.

4

Some doodles with the TTG designs

Originally they weren’t supposed to be connected to each other but put together it looks like they were on a date before being rudely interrupted

Hello, hello! May I introduce you to another of my beloved coupling?

-Both their names start with ‘R’
-Rarepair
-Sassy
-Puns
-Has a special bond
-Different yet similar
-Kind of a loner
-Book lovers
-NERDS
-Red & Violet
-Same height (5'4")
-Same number of letters in their name (5)
-Birds of a feather, flock together

Sounds familiar?

Here’s an obligatory crossover.

What can I say, Robrin? Reiven’s right.

Instead of posting on a new post, I’m just gonna edit this and put this doodle here for completion haha

Scent

This oneshot idea has been written in the notes of my phone for literally forever, so last night I started writing it up.

Fluff ahoy. Post-Tokyo.


Exhaustion didn’t even begin to cover what he was feeling as he trudged towards the main room, doing so as quietly as he possibly could. Such a skill wasn’t usually difficult for him considering his level of stealth.

But when fatigue was thrown into the mix, his footsteps were a little louder and stealth kind of went out the window.

Robin yawned as he moved. His legs felt sluggish and his signature red backpack was weighing heavy on his shoulders, even though there wasn’t that much stuff inside. He had a feeling his mask was slightly askew too but he wasn’t too bothered considering he’d be taking it off soon enough.

As the doors opened with a whoosh, Robin couldn’t help but smile as the familiar scent of home filled his senses. The faint aroma of pancakes with the smallest hint of tofu in the air, the slight burn smell from the game station running throughout the day, whiffs of the girls’ respective perfumes.

It always hit him harder when he’d been away for a while.

“Rob!” Came a surprised but upbeat voice.

Keep reading

Gregg Araki, Eternal Teenager by Charles Bramesco

“Life is lonely, boring and dumb.” —The Doom Generation

“I feel like a gerbil smothered in Richard Gere’s butthole.” —also The Doom Generation

Gregg Araki likes young people. He likes their asymmetrical dyed hair and ripped denim, the tight fabrics that look like placeholders waiting to be ripped off. He likes shoegaze and dream-pop music, Cocteau Twins and Ride and the Smiths. He likes drugs, whether that’s the de-stressing release of a hand-rolled joint, the supercharged kick from a bump of coke, or the rush from the right colored pill. He likes junk food, low-budget grindhouse movies, and joyriding. And he likes sex— all different kinds, with boys and/or girls, with multiple partners, often at once.

Araki clutters his films with signifiers of his many fixations, like a student doodling in the margins of their marble composition notebook or taping up magazine clip-outs to the inside of their locker. It’s all mashed together into one overstuffed barrage of out-there allusions, conspicuously cool stylistic flourishes, and endlessly quotable catchphrases. In the case of Totally Fucked Up, The Doom Generation, and Nowhere—three of the director’s early films that fans have colloquially bound together as the “Teenage Apocalypse trilogy”—those qualities of adolescence and freewheeling messiness are inextricably linked. The soul of Araki’s trilogy, the key to its rowdy pubescent essence, lives in the flaws that make these films as perversely charismatic as they are. To be a teenager is to be a fuck-up, and nobody fucks up more beautifully or entertainingly than Gregg Araki.

His earliest films were highly experimental, blithely erotic projects slapped together for next to nothing, suffused with their director/writer’s passions and fetishes. But even as Araki advanced out of both his twenties and the five-figure budget range, his unapologetic teen spirit polarized audiences. It outright alienated Roger Ebert, who notoriously slapped The Doom Generation with a zero-star rating and called its director “a stylist who can use concepts like iconography and irony to weasel away from his material.” The esteemed critic objected to the constant sarcasm and thick stew of references, and while his charges may very well stick, they’re also integral to the film’s representation of teenager-dom.

Totally Fucked Up is a Handicam-shot chronicle of queer teenage life in fifteen parts, The Doom Generation follows a nasty-tempered ménage à trois on a bloodsoaked spree across the California sprawl, and Nowhere tracks the evolution of a relationship between two polyamorous bisexual teenagers during a secret alien invasion. All three films share the foremost objective of replicating what it feels like to be young, punk, and horny. Rather than merely depicting the radical mood swings and world-is-ending dramatics of the pre-adulthood years, Araki’s films actively perform adolescence.

Nobody could possibly deny that Araki’s trilogy has a whirling chaos to it, but rather than the mark of an undisciplined filmmaker, this constitutes a deliberate aesthetic choice befitting the material. The Doom Generation’s combustible trio on the lam calls to mind the previous year’s Natural Born Killers as well as Bonnie and Clyde, Badlands, and a host of forgotten teensploitation flicks that all gibe with Araki’s arrested-development reference points. What, after all, could be more recognizably teenage than bearing your influences and personal faves for all the world to admire? Nowhere (named after the 1990 EP from shoegaze godfathers Ride) applies that more-is-more-is-more philosophy to its narrative structure, which jumps from character to character whenever the plot threatens to stagnate even for a moment.

His films are terminally chill when they’re not manic, finding quiet interludes (emphasis on ludes) for fake deep philosophizing. “Ever feel like reality is more twisted than dreams?” wonders James Duval as The Doom Generation’s cuckolded Jordan White. Araki’s not affecting the irony that his opponents so frequently accuse him of; while he’s not sincerely asking the question (even he’s not that stoned), he’s sincerely presenting the act of asking it. The director understands what would possess the character to say such a thing, and because he treats the line of dialogue as valid instead of an object for mockery, the overall tone comes off as sneering snark. The closest Araki’s characters get to an undying devotion of love is “I hope we die simultaneously, like in a car wreck or a nuclear bomb blast or something.” Grappling with meaning far beyond one’s sphere of comprehension is also a fundamental component of the teenage experience.

Oh, and the sex. There is, to put it mildly, a lot of doing-it in le cinema de Araki. He’s unabashed about the pleasure he takes in the image of the body, male and female alike (Araki has self-identified as bisexual), though most of his scenes aren’t oriented around mutual pleasure or even romance. There’s a hectic, desperate sting to the furtive rutting that goes on between the main couple of Nowhere, the assorted lovers of Totally Fucked Up, and the central threesome of The Doom Generation. The movements are fast, sloppy, driven by hunger. Araki skirts any unearned romanticization of youth sexuality and exposes a truth often denied by cinema: teenagers are not necessarily better at boning, they just try harder. Jordan and Amy Blue (a standout Rose McGowan) share the following exchange as they lie in postcoital cool-down:

“Don’t you think sex is, like, totally strange? Just the whole idea of it: all fleshy and stiff, inserted in these warm squishy places?”
“I think it’s more powerful than we’d like it to be.”
“It’s fuckin’ trippy, that’s for sure.”

Araki welcomes the awkwardness, the uncomfortableness, all the wrinkles of lovemaking that get ironed out with experience. The unsanitized experience, warts and all (occasionally literally), make it to the screen intact.

If the gratuitous sex or hormonal shifts in tone don’t get his detractors bristling, Araki’s retro razor-blade dialogue can still come off as overbearing. To acolytes of colorful Z-grade cinema scripts, lines like “You’re like a life support system for a cock!” qualify as sacred psalms. To non-believers, however, a one-liner as gleefully trashy as “This party’s about as much fun as an ingrown butt hair” sounds like the handiwork of a man infatuated with his own voice. But again, that characteristic, however amateurish, emulates the teen preoccupation with slang. Youths form social groups and individual identity through highly specialized vernacular; if it sounds like Araki’s speaking an insular language that only his chosen people can pick up, that means he’s on the right track.

The MTV-on-even-more-drugs highs and lo-fi lows, the incorrigible horndoggery, the too-cool-for-school dialogue, the efforts to do everything at the same time — it all comes back to Araki’s core nature as a trier. The Teenage Apocalypse trilogy finds Araki trying extremely hard to be cool, and this may be the most quintessentially teenage, nakedly honest aspect of his entire oeuvre. In his trilogy, Araki strives to produce a pop-culture object that will transfix the same burnout punks he fetishizes in his films, an obsession he clearly shares. That desire to be liked, to fit in, to be like your idols—that’s the central pillar of school-aged emotional immaturity.

Across the scores and scores of movies about young people, the default authorial viewpoint has been that of someone who’s been through it all. Tragedies and triumphs are kept in perspective, and by the time the end credits roll, our protagonist has probably learned a valuable lesson or two about the world of adulthood. But the most honest, true-to-life portrayals of teens don’t come from the worldly-wise stance of an adult looking back; they should hum with the ragged-around-the-edges, work-in-progress feeling of that specific life phase. Araki’s Teenage Apocalypse trilogy gives us cinema’s closest approximation of an impossible dream: a professional film about the agony and ecstasy (and Ecstasy) of being a teenager, straight from the source. Ah, to be young, hot and turned-on forever…

Can we just..

Can we just talk about Teen Fucking Titans

This show was amazing, like Teen Titans Go can not live up to the amount of messages and things that Teen Titans taught. Like that shit got super dark and deep at one point. 

A few examples

1) The episode that talked about racism

There was an actual episode of Teen Titans that talked about racism and the person being racist was not the usual bad guy/weird looking dude. No the guy being racist was a actual hero. It’s amazing how much this episode taught. It talked about how even the greatest heroes in the world can be the world’s biggest asshole.

What happened was a man named Val Yor, an amazing hero, met the teen titans. Now Starfire is a Tamaranian. When Val Yor learns that, he calls her a ‘Troq’, which is basically a word that insults all Tamaranian’s. Despite Starfire being the cutest thing ever, Val Yor refused to accept her, because she was a Tamaranian.

If that wasn’t even enough, then came the ending. 

Now at one point in the episode Starfire saves Val Yor’s ass from dying. She did what ever she could to help. But at the end, Val Yor still called her a Troq. It’s amazing that even though Starfire saved Val Yor, he still insulted her culture or her ‘people’. At the end, when Val Yor leaves in his space ship straight after insulting Tamaranian’s. Starfire says “There is nothing you have done, there will always be people who say mean words because you are different” and if that doesn’t convince you that Starfire is amazing then I don’t know what will.

2) Feeling Replaced

In one episode, Blackfire (Starfire’s sister), comes to visit her. Starfire is extremely happy and all. Until, her friends start liking Blackfire a little bit more than she wants them to. She bonds with each and everyone of them (even Raven) and even got a little too close to Robin. Starfire felt diminished and a little hurt that they would ignore her for Blackfire. But Starfire didn’t feel truly replaced until the Teen Titans asked for Blackfire to join the Teen Titans. Starfire then attempts to run away, feeling like Blackfire would be better than her.

At the end of the episode, Robin confronts Starfire after Blackfire goes to jail. Starfire explains about how everyone seemed to be really enjoying Blackfire and was glad that the truth was figured out before she was replaced. In response to that, Robin denies it. He explains to her that Starfire was a one of a kind girl and that she would never be replaced. 

I think this episode explains a lot about feelings of abandoment and that simple things telling someone how they never will be replaced will help them. 

3) Fears

Now we all know Raven is a bit hard headed and doesn’t like showing emotions. Now in this episode, the Teen Titans decide to have a movie night. This movie turns out to be a horror movie. After the movie is over all of the Teen Titans show their emotions of being extremely being scared of the movie except for Raven who denies being scared. Later that night, all the Teen Titans are awoken be a sound. The episode continues as the Teen Titans try to find out who is making the sounds, and as they progress one by one, all the teen titans mysteriously start disappearing. All, except Raven. When only Raven is left, a monster attacks her. Raven chants that she is not scared of the monster. But eventually realization dawned on her that she was scared and that was how she defeated the monster. Turns out, the monster was something Raven made with her magic unwillingly because of her fear. 

This episode is definitely one of the horror episodes. If it was a real life horror movie, I would have freaked. But anyways, this episode explains so much. It talks about how you shouldn’t be afraid to face you fears and use it to your advantage. So what if you’re scared? That’s completely normal. It talks about taking that fear and not letting it stop you from doing what you want.

4) Puberty

Yes people, Teen Fucking Titans talked about puberty. When I rewatched this episode as a teen, I realized that there was an actual episode that talked about dealing with puberty

Now in this episode, Starfire starts growing weird things around her body. First a large bump forms on her head, then she soon gets scales and her fingernails become long and black and white. If that wasn’t bad enough her feet turn large and start growing hair. Starfire feels extremely self conscious of her self and cover her self up entirely in order to hide her self from her friends because of fear of being laughed at. It all goes to doom when Teen Titans get an alarm for a monster. The entire get up comes off and everyone sees how Starfire looks. Starfire, in a state of panic, fly’s in to space and decides to live at a another planet because she couldn’t face her friends. Problem was each and every planet she went to they would kick her off because they thought she was too scary. 

When Starfire lands on one planet, she meets a woman, who explains to her that it’s normal for a Tamaranian to get like this after a certain stage and that each and every Tamaranian goes through a different process. But this woman turns out to be a Tamaranian eater and tries to eat her when the rest of the Teen Titans save her. Starfire does eventually turn back to normal and even gains a new power. The Teen Titans tell her that they would never judge Starfire on the way she looks.

Now this episode explains a lot. This was probably one of my favorite episodes especially because of the fact it talks about how hard it is going through puberty, Not only that but it explains about how everyone goes through it differently and that it’s not your fault. It also tells you that, it may be one hell of a ride and that it’s gonna be tough, but when it’s over good things will come out of it. 

5) The First Time They Met

Now I couldn’t get the proper picture I was looking for, but its with Cyborg and Raven. Now this is a iconic moment from the entire and it all started out with the first time all of them met. Now we all know Raven is the daughter of a devil who wants to take over the world, so when she does help the Teen Titans, she doesn’t feel welcome in the group. She feels as though she was different because her main purpose was to destroy the Earth not save it. So when Cyborg learn about this, the famous quote he says is “He’s green, half of me is metal and she’s from outer space, you fit in just fine”. I don’t really need to say much because the quote explains it all.