ted animation

“Here, put on this blindfold.”

Ted the Animator: “…I’m sorry?”

Carl the Animator: “Don’t be. Grab this dart, I need to pick a color.”

Ted the Animator: “I’m so confused.”

Carl the Animator: “Dartboard in place. Ready?”

Ted the Animator: “No! There’s nothing more dangerous than ‘sharp objects you can’t see’ plus ‘Carl telling you to do something.’”

Carl the Animator: “I moved at least 70% of the fragile things. Just throw it.”

Ted the Animator: “…oh, goodness, here goes…”

Ted the Animator: “…did I hit anything?”

Carl the Animator: “Beautiful! Narrowly avoided Lime Green, and barely hit the edge of Bright Blue. Blue it is, then.”

Ted the Animator: “I’m afraid to take the blindfold off.”

Carl the Animator: “Aaaaaaaand done. It’s beautiful, fear not.”

Ted the Animator: “…what.”

Ted the Animator: “What… what is… why….”

Carl the Animator: “Good choice, that. Lime Green would have looked weird, blended in with the hands and all that.”

Ted the Animator: “…why is the pig blue.”

Carl the Animator: “Maybe we should get creative on the chickens, too….”

Ted the Animator: “WHY IS THE PIG BLUE, CARL.”

Carl the Animator: “The same reason this scene has a bank executive dressed up as a green monster with purple hair in a business suit chasing chickens and teenagers while riding a pig through a rentable-for-dances barn.”

Ted the Animator: “…which is?”

Carl the Animator: “Because it can.”

youtube

This is a fun animation TED Talk about cats’ unique behavior. It was animated by @chintislundgren

Enjoy! 

5

Tsunamis are caused by energy originating underwater from a volcanic eruption, a submarine landslide, or, most commonly, an earthquake on the ocean floor.

1. For example, the tectonic plates of the Earth’s surface slip, releasing a massive amount of energy into the water. 2. This energy travels up to the surface, displacing water and raising it above the normal sea level.

3. Gravity pulls that energy back down.

4. As a result, the energy ripples outwards horizontally. Thus, the tsunami is born, moving at over 500 miles per hour.  

From the TED-Ed Lesson How tsunamis work - Alex Gendler

Animation by Augenblick Studios

“...ok, so, I understand cartoon logic...”

Ted the Animator: “Mmhmm?”

Carl the Animator: “…and the plot necessities of a less-than-serious show…”

Carl the Animator: “…and willing suspension of disbelief, and all that…”

Ted the Animator: “Yeah?”

Carl the Animator: “…but it still doesn’t change the fact that Shaggy is approached by a 2-foot-wide cycloptic eye with a blood-red pupil the size of his head, and he instantly assumes it’s Scooby.

Ted the Animator: “Yyyyyyeah.”

Carl the Animator: “…or, the fact that the dinosaur somehow stuck its eye, like… three feet inside of a log.”

Ted the Animator: “I’m proud of you, Carl. You’ll be a grade-A nitpicker yet.”

Carl the Animator: “I mean, I’m normally all about just winging it, but even *I* have my standards.”

“Hey, I saw one of your Velma blinks was a little soulless.”

Ted the Animator: “Oh… yeah, sorry, I was kinda rushing and put her eyes too low.”

Carl the Animator: “Don’t worry, though. I fixed it for you.”

Ted the Animator: “…really?”

Carl the Animator: “Yeah, I drew Shaggy to look all weirded out by it so it doesn’t look out-of-place.”

Ted the Animator: “That… um… thanks?

Carl the Animator: “You’re welcome. Really, it was the least I could do.”

Ted the Animator: “I… I can believe that, yeah.”

7 healthy tips for a better night’s sleep

It’s back to school time! Here’s a healthy reminder to get your sleep on - consistently & intentionally - this semester. 

Sleep is critical for mind and body health. Without it, the effects can be severe. Below, neuroscientist Claudia Aguirre provides 7 healthy tips for a better night’s sleep:

1. Aim for power hours. Sleep the recommended amount for a restorative night. That is: between 9 and 12 hours for school-aged children, 8 to 10 hours for teenagers, and 7 to 9 hours for adults. [Animation by TED-Ed + Josephine Mark]

2. Ban the blue. Filter the blue light of your electronic device and sleep better. Studies show that blue light from electronic devices can delay sleep onset and affect overall circadian rhythm. [Animation by Javier Saldeña/TED-Ed]

3. Spoon. Sleeping on the side may help the brain clear waste more efficiently than sleeping on the back or belly. [Animation by TED-Ed + Josephine Mark]

4. Breathe deep. Deep breathing triggers the body’s relaxation response. What’s more, inhaling can drive cerebrospinal fluid flow to help clear brain waste and oxygenate the brain. [Animation by TED-Ed + Josephine Mark]

5. Don’t overdo it. Science is still working this one out, but there are some cases where too much sleep can pose a health risk. Better set that alarm. [Animation by Alan Foreman/TED-Ed]

6. Exercise. Lab experiments show that regular exercise can protect the brain from sleep deprivation-induced memory deficits. [Animation by Andrew Zimbelman/TED-Ed]

7. Keep cool. You just might get a better night’s rest if you sleep in a cool room (or stick your feet out). [Animation by TED-Ed + Josephine Mark]

For more health tips from experts, check out 7 TED-Ed Lessons for a healthier you.

Author bio: Claudia Aguirre is a neuroscientist and the author of several TED-Ed Lessons, including What would happen if you didn’t sleep? and Does stress cause pimples? Check her work and research out on Twitter & Facebook & Instagram.

“Ted... I don't get microwaves.”

Ted the Animator: “…what?”

Carl the Animator: “Microwaves.”

Ted the Animator: “Microwaves?” 

Carl the Animator:Microwaves.”

Ted the Animator: “…like, how they work?”

Carl the Animator: “Nah, I can google that. That’s the easy part.”

Ted the Animator: “…ok?”

Carl the Animator: “What I don’t get is why the manufacturers make the doors louder than a space shuttle launch.” 

Ted the Animator: “Oh. Do they?”

Carl the Animator: “Yes! Every other cooking method has a reasonable operational volume for use in quiet houses at night. Microwave doors, though? KACHUNG!

Ted the Animator: “I was completely unaware.”

Carl the Animator: “What, have you never made 1 A.M. pizza rolls or something?”

Ted the Animator: “…no. No Carl, I have not.”

Carl the Animator: “Oh, you live a sheltered life, my friend.”

Carl the Animator: “GPSs are mysterious, too. Why do they like to randomly take you down elaborate, windy, and slooooow residential routes?”

Ted the Animator: “Inaccurate maps, prolly?”

Carl the Animator: “Maybe… or, maybe it’s ‘cause they want to give time estimates, so they need a guinea pig to try the insane and obviously-bad routes just to see what happens?

Ted the Animator: “I’m sure there’s at least one conspiracy theory website about that.” 

Carl the Animator:And, while I’m at it, why are Froot Loops spelled in such a stupid way?”

Ted the Animator: “Yeah, that’s… that’s a little weird, I guess.”

Carl the Animator: “They could just as easily switch their random vowel swap and make it Fruit Luips, but you don’t see them using that, now do you.”

Ted the Animator: “…that wasn’t the direction I thought you were going with that, but ok.”

Carl the Animator: “And why is the Mattress Firm called Mattress Firm?!

Ted the Animator: “It means ‘firm’ like ‘business organization’, Car-”

Carl the Animator: “Terrible marketing. They should call it the Mattress Soft.”

Ted the Animator: “…you’re crazy, but at least it’s an endearing kind of crazy, Carl.”

Carl the Animator: “Hashtag lifegoals.”

Anyone who knows of Ted Lewis will recognize that voice of his right away.  Anyone who knows of a show called Kirby of the Star (or Kirby: Right Back At Ya according to 4kids) knows that he voiced King Dedede’s lackey, Escargon.  Anyone who knows me personally knows that I have a love-hate relationship with this show and not because of the 4kids dubbing.  But that’s a rant for another day never.

This is still in development but since I have no work tomorrow I’ll probably have it all finished or mostly by then.

“We need to make up some spooky snacks for Shag and Scoob to see in the refrigerator.”

Carl the Animator: “Hmm… what’s the theme, again?”

Ted the Animator: “Random castle that has a werewolf, a vampire, and a Frankenstin’s Monster-esque guy.”

Carl the Animator: “Lemme think… thematic spooky foods….”

Ted the Animator: “Well, what with there being a werewolf and all, let’s start with Werewolf Snacks. That sorta plays into the dog treat theme.”

Carl the Animator: “Yeah, and uhh, uhhhhh… Vampire Wings!”

Ted the Animator: “…why would a vampire eat its own wings?”

Carl the Animator: “Maybe they’re vampire bat wings.”

Ted the Animator: “Vampires are pretty well known for just drinking blood, Carl.”

Carl the Animator: “Maybe this one is branching out.”

Ted the Animator: “…riiiight, moving along. Let’s get back to something sensible, and relating to the Frankenstein’s Monster guy. How about ‘Electric–’”

Carl the Animator: “OOOOOOH I KNOW!”

Carl the Animator: “FRIED MOONBEAMS!”

Ted the Animator: “I… what does that have to do with Frankenstein?”

Carl the Animator: “Nothing.”

Ted the Animator: “…what does eating moonbeams have to do with any of the monsters of the episode?”

Carl the Animator: “I dunno. These Fried Moonbeams are new and improved, though.”

Ted the Animator: “…this is why we don’t let you create props, Carl.”

Potential Original Script--Lorax

So I was talking to my friend about something and I wanted to post a thought about it. I’ve wanted to talk about for a while–The Lorax. 

Ha ha, you wish. Try again. 

Yeah, there it is…everyone’s little hypocritical marketing whore. There’s nothing I can say here that hasn’t already been said when it comes to the actual content of the movie and Illumination’s unreasonable treatment of the character. A quality and inspiring story taken and reduced to all the substance of a wet piece of paper, Illumination sold out an environmentalist character to Mazda (and 70 other companies), it shifts blame, etc. 

But as some of you may have noticed, there are a lot of signs that this mess of a film is something put together from an entirely darker script that took its story more seriously. There is no pre-production script available to prove this, only the script that ended up as the movie in the end. However, the proof lies in the storyboards and soundtracks. Specifically two songs, Thneedville (Original Demo) and Biggering. But within these two songs are clues to a different story than what we ended up having to suffer. 

So let’s start with the wide eyed Zac Efron fuck up himself, Ted Wiggins (almost insultingly named after Dr. Seuss’s birth name, Theodore Giesel). 

Probably the biggest hint of a major script change is in the original demo version of the opening song, Thneedville. In it, a huge portion that was cut out of the final version of the song is revealed–specifically a solo given to Ted. In it he gushes over a newly released toy called a Whosit and how its everything he’s ever wanted….aside from all the other extravagant things he has wanted, including but not limited to a sports car and a robotic twin of himself. In the proceeding lyrics he wails over the happy tune about how desperately he wants it, needs it, that ‘all he’s ever wanted is the stuff that he doesn’t have’. 

From this its pretty easy to figure out that in this missing pre-script, Ted’s character was not trying to impress Taylor Swift (yeah, I know the character has a name, I just don’t care). In fact, its entirely possible that Taylor Swift’s character might have not been in the original script at all, since her only real role in the final movie was to be the motivator to Ted’s actions. But here it seems Ted’s motivation is his role as the consumer–he WANTS things, he wants it all, he’s not satisfied with anything. I’ve heard rumors that his original goal was that he wanted the tree just so he could HAVE it and be the only one who had it. I have no confirmation on this but it seems about right. 

So, to put it simply, the bland as dishwater protagonist of the Illumination movie was meant to serve the purpose of rounding off the Trinity: the defender, the corporation, and the consumer. Within the original book there was very little sympathy, if any at all, for the issues a corporation can have. The television special improved on this, pointing out that there is no answer as simple as ‘just stop it’ because corporation of course employ people and provide products. But something that never has been properly addressed has been the role of the consumer in all of this. What fuels the corporation is the ‘need’ from the consumer and in thus the consumer has a role in the issue of corporations and environmentalism. While the Once-ler may be the dealer of the drug, it is the choice of the consumer whether or not to turn the other way and ignore the consequences behind the product they purchase. In this the consumer is just as responsible for this cycle as the corporation. 

This, to me, would’ve justified the creation of the new Lorax movie because it would’ve addressed something that the book and television special had failed to fully address. Yes, its a little weird that the Once-ler has a face despite purposely being kept out of view in the previous iterations but the true failing of the final movie is that it doesn’t truly add anything to the source material and in fact very well may take away from it. Pretty boy Once-ler is just a weird choice, not the true failing of the film. 

Speaking of, why don’t we talk about how Once-ler adds into this.

I’m not sure at what point that his song was changed from Biggering to How Bad Can I Be (though you’ll notice many of the lines in the latter are just repurposed from the former), but the fact remains that it is another refugee of the original plot. In this, its noticeable that it fits in better with the original song as well. Biggering and the original Thneedville seem to draw a bit of an interesting parallel between the Once-ler character and the Ted Wiggins character that was inexplicably dropped from the film: the parallel of greed and pride. 

The original lines talk about how the Once-ler wants to ‘bigger’ everything. He wants a bigger office, a bigger chair, a bigger staff, a bigger hat, and that all this biggering is ‘triggering more biggering’. Basically, he wants stuff because it’ll make him look better to everyone. More and more stuff. He will never be satisfied no matter how much he has similar to how in the original Thneedville song, Ted only wants everything that he doesn’t have and is jealous that anyone else has anything. This shows that the original intention was not just for the Once-ler to tell Ted about what happened in the past, but to curb Ted from spiraling down like he did. To keep Ted from ‘Biggering’. 

As far as the final script is concerned, there is very little that can be said for the ‘expanded’ protagonist other than Ted is so underdeveloped that you’ll probably forget that he’s there. It has been often pointed out that the Illumination film makes the problem too black and white, framing a ‘good’ side and a ‘bad’ side with the good side being the audience proxy therefore failing to teach people that this kind of indulgence could happen to them just as easily as anyone else. Ironically it seems that this major flaw might have been the POINT in the original script, with the consumer (Ted) being cast as the one who has to choose between his lavish behavior and the sacrifices that have to be made.

I’m not really sure what was responsible for these changes, perhaps Illumination Animation not wanting to make people feel bad about themselves, but it definitely happened and it ultimately hurt the film. Ted as a parallel for the Once-ler makes the film more viable because it inevitably presents the question that the book always begged to all of us. 

“Unless someone like you cares a whole awful lot, nothing’s going to get better. It’s not.”