technology for fitness

Exquisite.

I drew my favorite fashion model, Symmetra.~ *throws sparkles* I wish she would get more legendary skins. OTL

the signs as little things of jaehyun

aries: erotic body


taurus: his big appetite


gemini: girl group legs


cancer: his excitement when the members call him “jeffrey”


leo: fair skin


virgo: diMPLES


libra: when he steals others’ food


scorpio: his dirty mind


sagittarius: being everyone’s bias wrecker (even if your bias is jaehyun)


capricorn: being born on valentines day


aquarius: his cooking skills in nct life s4


pisces: looking older than he actually is

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Y’all gotta fucking read In Other Lands by Sarah Rees Brennan. 

Sometimes it’s not the kid you expect who falls through to magicland, sometimes it’s … Elliot. He’s grumpy, nerdy, and appalled by both the dearth of technology and the levels of fitness involved in swinging swords around. He’s a little enchanted by the elves and mermaids. Despite his aversion to war, work, and most people (human or otherwise) he finds that two unlikely ideas, friendship and world peace, may actually be possible.

THESE KIDS NEED HUGS AND RESPECT

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mbti moodboards 

➥ INTP (the architect)

[INTPs] are introspective, logical, rational, clear-headed, informative, and attentive. The scientific systemization of all knowledge, or Architectonics, is highly developed in Architects, who are intensely curious and see the world as something to be understood. Their primary interest is to determine how things are structured, built, or configured. Architects are designers of theoretical systems and new technologies. Rearranging the environment to fit their design is a distant goal of Architects.

Architects are logically and verbally precise. They tend to analyze the world in depth. They prefer to quietly work alone and they may shut other people out if they are focused on analysis. This, coupled with the fact that Architects are often quiet, makes it difficult for other individuals to get to know them. (x)

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Technology helped me through the emotional roller coaster of CES

“Humans love to control how they feel. Booze and coffee have been perking us up and lubricating social situations for millennia. Mood-enhancing technology, on the other hand, usually tries to emulate a cup of joe or a glass of wine but without the need for rinsing your liver. I’m generally OK with pumping chemicals into my body, but with a few mood-changing gadgets catching my eye in the run-up to this year’s CES, I thought I’d give some a go. The hope was that I could avoid the usual uppers-and-downers routine that a week in Vegas demands.” - James Trew, Deputy Managing Editor, Engadget 

This was an excerise in sketching a bunch of figures in ink from memory. I chose to do Tomorrowland characters (my crossover fancomic I’m still working on in my head) but as I drew I subconsciously themed it. All these characters are technology themed hero’s! So yeah! Neat.

Their designs are based on the story’s premise. The comic takes place in 2037, in the far future and each respective character’s shows take place in a time I decided made sense. So in 2037 Kim and Ron are in their 30’s and have a child in middle school. But the Kratts Bros are the same age as they are in their show because I head cannon their technology is far advanced and fits in the year 2037 more. Also they upgrade to full body power suits eventually in the comic

anonymous asked:

MIT sounds like a wonderful school, undoubtedly home to such amazing and bright minds. However, it seems like your blog only focuses on the great aspects of MIT. Can you shed some light on some negative aspects of the institution? Thanks Rona!

hey!

I’m really sorry if my blog came off as sugarcoating MIT in any way–that’s like the opposite of my goal, and I want to give people a realistic, honest depiction of what college and my life is like.

To be honest, I feel somewhat duped. As I’ve mentioned on here, MIT convinced me it was great for the humanities. A Comparative Media Studies professor personally called me the day after I got in. Before Campus Preview Weekend, I got an email from the humanities department, asking me to attend a lecture series that would be held over the weekend. And so I chose MIT–and I’ll be honest here, I felt very pressured to choose the most “prestigious” school I was accepted into, and that probably factored into my decision. (The other real option was UPenn, and I really disliked the rich frat-boy/Wharton snake culture there.)

We have an annual career fair here. One of my friends saw that the New York Times had a booth for recruiting and went to talk to them. Turned out, they were only interested in recruiting people to work on the tech side of things. “We recruit writers as well, but not from MIT,” one of them said.

And that’s my biggest concern–that if I stay, even if I switch my major to humanities, that I’ll never be able to get into a top MFA program or get any kind of writing job. I’m scared that I’m falling behind the other writers–the kids who did the same competitions as me in high school, who went to other colleges with better English programs. 

My other concerns about MIT are ones that I suspect will arise at any university. I posted a Jenny Zhang quote on here a few days ago–something about being desperate to find an intellectual, artistic community. That’s exactly how I feel. People here seem so stressed that they live from problem set to problem set to midterm to final. Plus, I’m constantly reminded of the quote that goes, “When I was younger, I admired people who were smart. As I’ve gotten older, I learned to admire those who were kind.” MIT admits kids who won olympiad medals and international science fairs, but those awards no longer impress me the way they did when I was fifteen. I hate the superficiality of it all–how people gravitate towards those who are “gods”, as if winning an IMO gold medal automatically makes you kind or interesting or thoughtful. And I’m not simply saying that because I didn’t win a national STEM award–I got a good amount of attention after doing well at MIT’s writing prizes, and it didn’t make me less lonely.

What to know about being a Fashion Student

What people will say when you tell them you’re studying fashion

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They’ll then assume that you want to be a designer

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Not everyone who studies fashion is a designer. There are stylists, buyers, CEO’s, publicists, journalists, marketing analysts, social media managers, the list goes on..

They will probably assume you have the intelligence level of a goat.

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And when they do you tell them this

We’re not rocket scientists, but we take calculus classes, statistics, economics, etc. The fashion industry is a multi-billion dollar industry. You think it’s run by idiots?

However there are times where you’ll walk into a class like

Not so bright people are everywhere, in fashion and elsewhere. If you find yourself surrounded by an astounding number of them, sit back and enjoy the probably rare moment that you’re the smartest person in the room. 

According to our Instagrams this is what we do on the weekend.

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But this is probably what we’re actually doing on the weekend.

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Working, going to school, interning, it’s all tiring and by the end of the week your bed is just about the only place you want to be. 

How people think we all talk all the time

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How we actually talk

How people think we look going to class

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And yeah some girls do look like this, but then theres the other 50% who look like this

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Sweatpants are never something to be ashamed of.

How people think we spend our Friday nights

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How we actually spend our Friday nights

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Going out is expensive. Especially if you’re going to school in a big city like New York. Most of the time its easier and wayy cheaper to just bring the party inside. Which brings me to my next point:

People will assume you shop all the time. 

No. We’re just like other college students

People will think these are the guys you get to date

But really if we can find just one single, straight, remotely aesthetically pleasing guy we be like

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Oh and everyone will assume you’re on some kind of diet

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But its a lie

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The Middle: Three Major Lessons (Almost) Two Years at FIT Have Taught Me

It has been 467 days since my parents dropped me off in front of FIT’s doors. That is roughly 11,000 hours of my life spent as a business student at one of the top fashion schools in the country, if not the world.

In that time I have faced more here than any amount of time spent outside of New York before my college years. It’s true what they say: New York will eat you up and spit your pretty little self back out on the concrete. But, looking back from the half way point I finally understand what they mean when they say you will come out the other side a better, tougher, and even more stylish person. Being at FIT is the same deal. You are constantly surrounded by people with the drive of a Duracell bunny and the talent to match. There really is no better place to grow and get a serious reality check. Here are three very important lessons that as a sophomore going into her fourth semester can lay on you.

Lesson #1: Heels to a Monday 8 AM are NEVER a good idea.

Everyone thinks it before they come to fashion school: we all run around all hours of the morning and night in our best 6-inch stilettos. Wrong. Expectation: we drown ourselves in the biggest labels, the greatest designers, and are always dressed to the nines at all possible moments. We don’t believe in even going to the deli down the street without a full face of makeup and our Louboutins. Reality: alongside rent, tuition, and paying to live in a city that robs you of at least twenty dollars every time you step out your apartment doors, we go for affordable (but chic, of course) looks. Look around your morning classes and what will you see? Undoubtedly a group of twenty something’s that look like… wait for it. Normal college students. Ok, maybe not your typical sweatpants and hoodie duds, but we certainly don’t (all) look like we just stepped off the set of The Real Housewives. Fashion students are people too.

Lesson #2: Everything you think you already know is wrong.

We’re all guilty of it— we’ve watched The Devil Wears Prada a million and one times and can quote every line from every episode of Sex and the City so of course we think we know it all. It’s okay, it happened. It’s over. Time to move forward. Living and working in New York is not always like the movies. I can guarantee that working in the fashion industry is not what you think. One of the greatest things I have learned in my three internships thus far is to always listen and absorb everything happening around you, and throw everything you think you know out the window. Everyone starts at the same place: the bottom. You are not entitled to anything when you are just starting out, so be prepared to learn, learn, learn and work, work, work.

Lesson #3: Nothing is handed to you, ever.

I don’t care who you are, where you’re from, or however many connections you have coming into fashion school, we all have to prove that we have the drive, the passion, and the commitment to go after what we want. It’s a hard-knock and often times stressful life as a fashion student. You’ve got to remember that nothing happens by just waiting around and hoping. You have to make the effort. Pick up the phone, send an email, and scour the Internet to find out what you need in order to move forward. For every internship you apply to, there are seas of other candidates that want that spot. For every paper or article you write, there are twenty others for your professor to read. You aren’t ever going to be handed the opportunity of a lifetime, you’ve got to create the opportunities for yourself because once you get there it will feel a hundred more times as satisfying. Trust me.

Note: This article was written as part of my final project for my fashion journalism class in December 2013.
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Spring 2017 Worn Wear College Tour!

Folks, we’re hitting the road and traveling to colleges around the country to repair clothing for free and teach folks how to fix their own clothes. In an effort to repair more than just clothes, for this tour we’ve teamed up with the Post Landfill Action Network to create conversation and action towards a world with less waste. There will be some fun talks along the way from our own Rick Ridgeway, Vincent Stanley and many others.

The Patagonia Worn Wear repair team can fix about 40 garments per day (sorry, no repairs on luggage or shoes). All repairs are made on a first come, first served basis. One repair per guest. We fix all brands!

Tour stops

Click on each stop for details:

Thur 2/16  Feb. 16  10am-5pm  College of Charleston  Charleston, SC


Tue 2/21  Feb. 21  10am-5pm  University of Georgia  Athens, GA  


Thur 2/23  Feb. 23  11am-6pm  Clemson University  Clemson, SC     


Mon. 2/27  Feb. 27  10am-5pm  Warren Wilson College  Swannanoa, NC


Wed 3/1  Mar. 1  9am-3pm  American University  Washington DC 


Fri 3/3  Mar. 3  10am-5pm  Fashion Institute of Technology (FIT)  New York, NY  


Mon. 3/6  Mar. 6  11am-6pm  Yale University  New Haven, CT  


Wed 3/8  Mar. 8  10am-5pm   Mass Amherst  Amherst, MA 


Fri. 3/10  Mar. 10  10am-5pm  Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)   Cambridge, MA       


Tues 3/21  Mar. 21  9am-5pm  University of New Hampshire  Durham, NH  


Thurs. 3/23  Mar. 23  11am-6pm  University of Vermont  Burlington, VT  


Mon. 3/27  Mar. 7  10am-5pm  Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT)   Rochester, NY  


Wed. 3/29  Mar. 29  12pm-7pm  Ohio University  Athens, OH 


Fri 3/31  Mar. 31  10am-4pm  Michigan State University  East Lansing, MI  


Wed 4/5  Apr. 5  10am-4pm  University of Minnesota  Minneapolis, MN


Mon. 4/10  Apr. 10  10am-5pm  University of Colorado: Colorado Springs  Colorado Springs, CO  


Wed. 4/12  Apr. 12  10am-5pm  Utah State University  Logan, UT  


Tues. 4/18  Apr. 18  10am-5pm  University of Oregon   Eugene, OR 


Fri. 4/21  Apr. 21  10am-5pm  UC Berkeley  Berkeley, CA 


Tue. 4/25  Apr. 25  10am-5pm  Cal Poly SLO  San Luis Obispo, CA


Wed. 4/26  Apr. 26  11am-5pm  UC Santa Barbara  Santa Barbara, CA 

The World’s First Smart Electric Skates

These cool and innovative electric roller skates propel a wearer at up to 12 mph! Two sets of step-in footplates secure most types of footwear with strap bindings similar to those on snowboard boots, accommodating small and large feet. Supporting riders up to 250 lbs., each skate’s twin 6”-diam. wheels has a 55-watt motor integrated into its fiber-reinforced nylon frame. Tilting forward on the toes accelerates while tilting back on the heel gently brakes. The footplates also pivot down to put your foot in contact with the ground for walking or going upstairs. Each skate has a removable lithium-ion battery that provides up to 1 ½ hours of continuous power (up to a 6-mile/45 min. range), ideal for travel across a school campus, to a local cafe, or while roaming a neighborhood festival!

Available for purchase on Amazon

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Imperial Yellow 18th Century Fashion

I know, I’ve already made a yellow post before (you can check it HERE) but this very shade of yellow that came into fashion because of the Chinese influence became popular is just beautiful.

BTW I found a cotton velvet in this very shade and I think it would make a gorgeous riding habit!

Images from top:

  1. Back detail of a robe à l’anglaise (check out the buttons to wear it retroussée à la polonaise!!), ca. 1770s-1780s, Victoria & Albert Museum.
  2. French Brunswick jacket, 1765 - 1775, Victoria & Albert Museum.
  3. Dress, 1770s; men’s coat, 1790s, Fashion Institute of Technology.
  4. Dress made of 1740s Spitalfields fabric, 1770s, The Kyoto Costume Institute.
  5. Caitriona Balfe as Claire in Outlander, costume design by Terry Dresbach.
  6. French mitt, late 18th century-early 19th century, Museum of Fine Arts Boston.
  7. Floral robe á la polonaise, American, 1780-85, Metropolitan Museum of Art.
  8. Robe à la française, England, ca. 1760, LACMA.
  9. Embroidered vest, Norway, Nasjonalmuseet.
  10. Maternity outfit, mid 18th century, Sweden, Nordiskamuseet.