You’re looking at a real big deal.

Because in a nanotechnology lab, big deals come in smaller and smaller packages. What you see above is an extreme close-up of a 5 nanometer transistor. In an industry-first, the IBM Research Alliance developed nanosheet transistors that will enable a 5 nm chip. What’s so big about that? Well, by achieving a scale of 30 billion switches on a fingernail sized chip, it can deliver significant enhancements over today’s state-of-the-art 10 nm chips. This not only improves the performance of current technologies but also provides the fuel for the future demands of AI, VR, quantum and mobile technologies to run on. Plus, it could also make things like smartphone batteries last 2-3x longer between charges, so it may also be a real lifesaver too. 


Learn more about it->

Can we teach computers how to smell?

Researchers from IBM and Rockefeller University are trying to sniff out the answer. Smell may be the least understood of the five senses, so the team trained software to identify scents in order to learn more about how our brains perceive them. Their results prove for the first time that a scent can be predicted based on its molecular structure. Ultimately, as their database of scents grows, the predictions will become even more on the nose.


Learn how they did it →

Rogue Scientists Race to Save Climate Data from Trump

  AT 10 AM the Saturday before inauguration day, on the sixth floor of the Van Pelt Library at the University of Pennsylvania, roughly 60 hackers, scientists, archivists, and librarians were hunched over laptops, drawing flow charts on whiteboards, and shouting opinions on computer scripts across the room. They had hundreds of government web pages and data sets to get through before the end of the day—all strategically chosen from the pages of the Environmental Protection Agency and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration—any of which, they felt, might be deleted, altered, or removed from the public domain by the incoming Trump administration.

  By the end of the day, the group had collectively loaded 3,692 NOAA web pages onto the Internet Archive, and found ways to download 17 particularly hard-to-crack data sets from the EPA, NOAA, and the Department of Energy. Organizers have already laid plans for several more data rescue events in the coming weeks, and a professor from NYU was talking hopefully about hosting one at his university in February. But suddenly, their timeline became more urgent.
  On the day that the Inside EPA report came out, an email from O’Brien popped up on my phone with “Red Fucking Alert” in the subject line.“We’re archiving everything we can.”

Contamination-seeking drones - IBM Patent 9447448.

Stay back and let the drones do the dirty work. Patent 9447448 makes cognitive drones able to inspect and decontaminate places so humans don’t have to. The drones’ on-board AI system can collect and analyze samples, so it can identify and clean up any bacteria or outbreak. Meanwhile you get to hang back, safely out of harm’s way.


This is just one of the record-breaking 8,000+ patents IBM received this year. Explore the latest IBM patents. →

There are more than a dozen medically approved methods of birth control, including condoms, the pill and implants.

Now for the first time, a cell phone app has been certified as a method of birth control in the European Union.

Its creator, Elina Berglund, is a particle physicist who was part of the team that won the Nobel Prize in Physics in 2013. Not long after she helped discover the elusive subatomic particle known as the Higgs boson, she left her job and went searching for answers to a different mystery: how to create an app to prevent pregnancy.

Berglund had relied on a hormonal birth control implant for ten years, but she and her husband were thinking about having kids and wanted a natural way to avoid pregnancy. None of the existing apps met her standards, so the couple used math to create one. She says programming the app wasn’t that different from particle physics.

Mobile App Designed To Prevent Pregnancy Gets EU Approval

Photo: Courtesy of Natural Cycles

theatlantic.com
Torching the Modern-Day Library of Alexandria
“Somewhere at Google there is a database containing 25 million books and nobody is allowed to read them.”
By James Somers

You were going to get one-click access to the full text of nearly every book that’s ever been published. Books still in print you’d have to pay for, but everything else—a collection slated to grow larger than the holdings at the Library of Congress, Harvard, the University of Michigan, at any of the great national libraries of Europe—would have been available for free at terminals that were going to be placed in every local library that wanted one.

At the terminal you were going to be able to search tens of millions of books and read every page of any book you found. You’d be able to highlight passages and make annotations and share them; for the first time, you’d be able to pinpoint an idea somewhere inside the vastness of the printed record, and send somebody straight to it with a link. Books would become as instantly available, searchable, copy-pasteable—as alive in the digital world—as web pages.

It was to be the realization of a long-held dream. “The universal library has been talked about for millennia,” Richard Ovenden, the head of Oxford’s Bodleian Libraries, has said. “It was possible to think in the Renaissance that you might be able to amass the whole of published knowledge in a single room or a single institution.” In the spring of 2011, it seemed we’d amassed it in a terminal small enough to fit on a desk.

“This is a watershed event and can serve as a catalyst for the reinvention of education, research, and intellectual life,” one eager observer wrote at the time.

On March 22 of that year, however, the legal agreement that would have unlocked a century’s worth of books and peppered the country with access terminals to a universal library was rejected under Rule 23(e)(2) of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure by the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York.

youtube

Hi. I’m Haiku, a black entrepreneur, that is madly in-love with music. That said, I slowly began to realize that some things make the process of sharing music with friends suuuuuper clunky lmao……

My app, PlayLyst, is my solution to the main problem….the aux cord (and bluetooth). I wanna make it easier and less time-consuming to show off your music. The Kickstarter for PlayLyst launches Tuesday, June 27th at 12:01 A.M.

If pledging isn’t your style then please….PLEASE BOOST THIS, not for the notes, but for a black man with an idea.

If you have any questions the please feel free to ask. I’m dedicating all my time to this so I will make sure to take the time to answer everyone.

Deep Blue’s checkmate turns 20.  

20 years ago today, IBM’s Deep Blue supercomputer won a game of chess against the reigning world champion Garry Kasparov, and the world got a glimpse into the future of technology. 14 years later, IBM Watson prevailed against the champions of Jeopardy!. Since then, Watson has worked with everyone from artists to doctors to engineers and more to enhance the ways we work, learn and make. We’re excited to see what we’ll build together in the next 20+ years to come.


See how AI has evolved ->