team: hurricanes

6

Valtteri Filppula and Teuvo Teräväinen have a summer tradition of having a private tennis competition. This summer they played for a dinner, Valtteri won. Teuvo was worried about his budget, having to pay for their dinner. Valtteri assured him that Teuvo really, really could afford it. (From Leijonat Inside.)

  • Anaheim Ducks: fuck the blackhawks
  • Arizona Coyotes: fuck the blackhawks
  • Buffalo Sabres: fuck the blackhawks
  • Calgary Flames: fuck the blackhawks
  • Carolina Hurricanes: fuck the blackhawks
  • Chicago Blackhawks: fuck you
  • Colorado Avalanche: fuck the blackhawks
  • Columbus Blue Jackets: fuck the blackhawks
  • Dallas Stars: fuck the blackhawks
  • Detroit Red Wings: fuck the blackhawks
  • Edmonton Oilers: fuck the blackhawks
  • LA Kings: fuck the blackhawks
  • Minnesota Wild: fuck the blackhawks
  • Montreal Canadiens: fuck the blackhawks
  • New Jersey Devils: fuck the blackhawks
  • New York Islanders: fuck the blackhawks
  • New York Rangers: fuck the blackhawks
  • Ottawa Senators: fuck the blackhawks
  • Philadelphia Flyers: fuck the blackhawks
  • Pittsburgh Penguins: fuck the blackhawks
  • San Jose Sharks: fuck the blackhawks
  • Tampa Bay Lightning: fuck the blackhawks
  • Toronto Maple Leafs: fuck the blackhawks
  • Vancouver Canucks: fuck the blackhawks
  • Washington Capitals: fuck the blackhawks
  • Winnipeg Jets: fuck the blackhawks
2

It seems like the title of an onion article, but it’s actually very serious. A study published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences found that hurricanes with feminine names killed significantly more people than hurricanes with masculine names.  The authors looked at several decades of hurricane deaths (excluding extreme outliers like Katrina and Audrey) and posed a question: 

Do people judge hurricane risks in the context of gender-based expectations?

 According to their study, the answer is a big yes.

Laboratory experiments indicate that this is because hurricane names lead to gender-based expectations about severity and this, in turn, guides respondents’ preparedness to take protective action.

In other words, because of some deep-seated perceptions of gender, people are less afraid of hurricanes with feminine names. And that means they are less likely to evacuate.