team voyagers

Command Team Relationships

-Spock to Kirk: I am and always shall be your friend.

-Riker to Picard: Serving with you has been an honor.

-Chakotay to Janeway: The woman warrior was brave and beautiful and very wise.

-Kira to Sisko: I…don’t think you’re the Devil.

2

Beauty and the Beast except Demospy raise your hand if you agree 

BON VOYAGE S2. EP2 HIGHLIGHTS:
  • Based on what each person ate from the snacks given to them, the team were decided: Namjin, Sope and maknae line were matches decided by heaven
  • Taekook fighting because V kept making jokes but at the end, they did what Tae proposed: saying Bon Voyage one by one without breaking the chain
  • Bts playing hid and seek to decide each team pocket money: They caught Namjoon only after 10 min and Taehyung kept finding Jimin instead of the opponent team … it was a mess.
  • Jin and Rapmon get handed 100$ (1st place), The holy trinity won 70$ (2nd place) and Jhope and Suga 50$ (3rd place)

The members are asked to not spend their personal money and only what they were given to buy both food and souvenirs. However, before that they all went swimming: 

  • They get in a boat and for 1 minute they all screamed “WOAH” and “WOW” every time a fish jumped from the sea
  • Jin English time while blowing kisses to the captain
  • Jimin dropping his towel in the water and Jungkook proposing to go in but a swimmer go in first (Jungkook also screamed “JIMIN SHIII” when he heard he dropped his belonging in water)
  • The members decide to dive in, Jimin go in first followed by Jin,  rapmon, Jungkook, Suga, Taehyung and Jhope who was super scared (duh) goes in last in the cutest way possible while holding his nose
  • The members are given a shell and only Jimin is able to make the sound come out 
  • BTS go snorkeling next: it was just so beautiful: They were like mermen in water. They even posed under the sea. Jhope was the only one who had some difficulties to dive, but he quickly figured it out

It is time to divide into teams: 

  • Everyone kept saying Aloha to a anyone and everyone
  • Maknae line visited souvenir stores, played games, and made bets all the time. They went to the beach (JK got hit by a wave and ended up drenched knowing that he was standing next to Vmin). They ended up buying pens because all three of them will use them for either writing or drawing. 
  • Namjin had more deep conversations and they were basically like some elderly couple that lived a happy marriage or some very close friends that were together since childhood, their synergy is no joke: The cutest was when Jin was helping Namjoon to blend the sunscreen on his face. While on the beach they made stacked stones (7 of them each) and prayed for the well-being of BTS. They ate dinner and when it was time for desert they watched the sunset and made poems. Jin also spoke about how he changed after the Fire era and that making people happy makes him happy too
  • Sope have different personalities and that’s why they complimented each other so well: They had matching Henna tattoos: they got turtles with a peace sign even if Suga wanted them to get hearts? Jhope spoke about his worries concerning his mixtape and wished for it to do well. 
  • The members gathered at the end of the day, sang together while having a drink and showed what each team bought. 
Voyager: The Space Between

Our Voyager 1 spacecraft officially became the first human-made object to venture into interstellar space in 2012. 

Whether and when our Voyager 1 spacecraft broke through to interstellar space, the space between stars, has been a thorny issue. 

In 2012, claims surfaced every few months that Voyager 1 had “left our solar system.” Why had the Voyager team held off from saying the craft reached interstellar space until 2013?

Basically, the team needed more data on plasma, which is an ionozied gas that exists throughout space. (The glob of neon in a storefront sign is an example of plasma).

Plasma is the most important marker that distinguishes whether Voyager 1 is inside the solar bubble, known as the heliosphere.  The heliosphere is defined by the constant stream of plasma that flows outward from our Sun – until it meets the boundary of interstellar space, which contains plasma from other sources.

Adding to the challenge: they didn’t know how they’d be able to detect it.

No one has been to interstellar space before, so it’s  like traveling with guidebooks that are incomplete.

Additionally, Voyager 1’s plasma instrument, which measures the density, temperature and speed of plasma, stopped working in 1980, right after its last planetary flyby.

When Voyager 1 detected the pressure of interstellar space on our heliosphere in 2004, the science team didn’t have the instrument that would provide the most direct measurements of plasma. 

Voyager 1 Trajectory

Instead, they focused on the direction of the magnetic field as a proxy for source of the plasma. Since solar plasma carries the magnetic field lines emanating from the Sun and interstellar plasma carries interstellar magnetic field lines, the directions of the solar and interstellar magnetic fields were expected to differ.

Voyager 2 Trajectory

In May 2012, the number of galactic cosmic rays made its first significant jump, while some of the inside particles made their first significant dip. The pace of change quickened dramatically on July 28, 2012. After five days, the intensities returned to what they had been. This was the first taste test of a new region, and at the time Voyager scientists thought the spacecraft might have briefly touched the edge of interstellar space.

By Aug. 25, when, as we now know, Voyager 1 entered this new region for good, all the lower-energy particles from inside zipped away. Some inside particles dropped by more than a factor of 1,000 compared to 2004. However, subsequent analysis of the magnetic field data revealed that even though the magnetic field strength jumped by 60% at the boundary, the direction changed less than 2 degrees. This suggested that Voyager 1 had not left the solar magnetic field and had only entered a new region, still inside our solar bubble, that had been depleted of inside particles.

Then, in April 2013, scientists got another piece of the puzzle by chance. For the first eight years of exploring the heliosheath, which is the outer layer of the heliosphere, Voyager’s plasma wave instrument had heard nothing. But the plasma wave science team had observed bursts of radio waves in 1983 and 1984 and again in 1992 and 1993. They determined these bursts were produced by the interstellar plasma when a large outburst of solar material would plow into it and cause it to oscillate.

It took about 400 days for such solar outbursts to reach interstellar space, leading to an estimated distance of 117 to 177 AU (117 to 177 times the distance from the Sun to the Earth) to the heliopause.

Then on April 9, 2013, it happened: Voyager 1’s plasma wave instrument picked up local plasma oscillations. Scientists think they probably stemmed from a burst of solar activity from a year before. The oscillations increased in pitch through May 22 and indicated that Voyager was moving into an increasingly dense region of plasma.

The above soundtrack reproduces the amplitude and frequency of the plasma waves as “heard” by Voyager 1. The waves detected by the instrument antennas can be simply amplified and played through a speaker. These frequencies are within the range heard by human ears.

When they extrapolated back, they deduced that Voyager had first encountered this dense interstellar plasma in Aug. 2012, consistent with the sharp boundaries in the charged particle and magnetic field data on Aug. 25.

In the end, there was general agreement that Voyager 1 was indeed outside in interstellar space, but that location comes with some disclaimers. They determined the spacecraft is in a mixed transitional region of interstellar space. We don’t know when it will reach interstellar space free from the influence of our solar bubble.

Voyager 1, which is working with a finite power supply, has enough electrical power to keep operating the fields and particles science instruments through at least 2020, which will make 43 years of continual operation.

Voyager 1 will continue sending engineering data for a few more years after the last science instrument is turned off, but after that it will be sailing on as a silent ambassador. 

In about 40,000 years, it will be closer to the star AC +79 3888 than our own Sun.

And for the rest of time, Voyager 1 will continue orbiting around the heart of the Milky Way galaxy, with our Sun but a tiny point of light among many.

Make sure to follow us on Tumblr for your regular dose of space: http://nasa.tumblr.com.

You ever thought you had an embarrassing moment? Well, it will NEVER top the second-hand embarrassment that Jungkook and Jimin felt when Jin started dancing weirdly and begging strangers in Hawaii to give him money to buy juice. I AM DONE WITH HIM HAHAHA. But the strangers at the end even applauded him and one came to shake his hand LOL. No one can be as confident as Seokjin. NO ONE.

Solar System: Things to Know This Week

Almost every day, we receive a message from a spacecraft more than 10.6 billion miles (about 17 billion km) away.

At that unimaginable distance, it takes the radio signal almost 16 hours to arrive. The spacecraft is Voyager 2, which launched 40 years ago this month. It’s still operating, sending back dispatches from the dark reaches well beyond the orbit of Pluto. Even now, scientists are still actively exploring the outer boundaries of the solar system using Voyager 2, decades after its “Grand Tour” of the giant planets Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune revealed their splendors like never before. This week, we recall 10 highlights from one of the most epic voyages in human history.

1. A Journey of 10 Billion Miles Begins With the First Step

Voyager 2 set out from Earth on Aug. 20, 1977. Even though it launched before its twin spacecraft, Voyager 1, it carried the ‘2’ moniker because mission planners knew its trajectory would bring it to Jupiter after Voyager 1’s arrival there.

2. The Grand Tour

Voyager 2’s trajectory was special because it took advantage of a rare orbital alignment to fly by all four gas giant planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune. It was the first, and so far the only, spacecraft to carry out a close-up reconnaissance of Uranus and Neptune.

3. Not-So-Gentle Giant

Voyager 2 flew by Jupiter in April 1979, capturing striking images of the planet’s volcanic moon Io and its violent storms larger than the entire Earth.

4. Saturn’s Not the Only One

Jupiter has its own ring system, and Voyager 2 provided the first pictures.

5. An Ocean Under Ice

During its Jupiter encounter, Voyager 2 obtained close-up looks at Jupiter’s moon Europa, including linear cracks and other features which first led scientists to realize Europa probably hides a vast sea of liquid water beneath an icy shell, the first known world outside Earth that could have an ocean.

6. Ringworld, the Prequel

Voyager 2 zoomed through the Saturn system in August 1981. It saw hints of mysterious features that the Cassini mission would later reveal in stunning detail, including Enceladus, with its bright surface that suggested geologic activity, and Saturn’s intriguing hexagonal jet stream.

7. Swiftly by a Tilted Planet

In January 1984, Voyager offered humanity its first detailed look at the seventh planet, Uranus, the only one tilted on its side relative to the Sun. Voyager images revealed 11 new moons, including Juliet, Puck, Cressida, Rosalind and Ophelia. The moon Miranda presented a bizarre landscape that left scientists debating its origins for years. Voyager also captured views of the planet’s lacy rings, and found that it is the coldest in the solar system, at minus 353 degrees Fahrenheit (59 Kelvin).

8. In Neptune’s Blue Realm

After picking up a gravitational speed boost at each previous planetary encounter, by the time Voyager reached Neptune it shot through the entire system of Neptunian rings and moons in a matter of hours. Voyager saw a titanic storm in Neptune’s windy atmosphere, discovered new moons, and revealed active geysers erupting on Triton’s frigid surface.

9. Postcards From the Edge

Although their cameras are no longer functioning, other key scientific instruments on board both Voyager spacecraft are still collecting data. Voyager 1 is exploring the boundary between the Sun’s realm and interstellar space. Voyager 2 hasn’t traveled quite as far. In September 2007, it crossed the termination shock (where the speed of the solar wind of charged particles drops below the speed of sound) at a point about 84 Astronomical Units from the Sun (more than twice the distance to Pluto). See https://go.nasa.gov/2uwrndb

10. Ride Along

Voyager’s mission is far from over. Engineers estimate the spacecraft will have enough power to operate into the mid-2020s. You can ride along at www.jpl.nasa.gov/voyager, or by following @NASAVoyager on Twitter and by downloading our free 3-D space simulation software, Eyes on the Solar System at eyes.nasa.gov.

One more thing: Inspired by the messages of goodwill carried on Voyager’s Golden Record, you’re invited to send a short, uplifting message to Voyager and all that lies beyond it via social media. With input from the Voyager team and a public vote, one of these messages will be selected for us to beam into interstellar space on Sept. 5, 2017—the 40th anniversary of Voyager 1’s launch. Post your message on social media with the tag #MessageToVoyager by Aug 15. Details: www.jpl.nasa.gov/voyager/message/

Make sure to follow us on Tumblr for your regular dose of space: http://nasa.tumblr.com

A vision can never be too audacious or lofty.  The two Voyager spacecraft provided so much scientific insight for our solar system.  A vision can be simple, or can be lofty and daring.  If the Voyager engineering team wanted to just send up a satellite, it was feasible with the current technology.  But a true vision will not only have an objective, but can also ask “what else?” The finish line does not necessarily mean the end.  Always ask what else you can do.  What else can be accomplished.  Go beyond.

2

…not only I’m dead but like… that smirk? That stare? Park Jimin knew exactly what this is gonna do to Jungkook. The way Jungkook looked at Jimin’s eyes/mouth? That bunny shooketh face he had when he turned away? Let me live. Also who at the Bon Voyage editing team thought this wasn’t obvious? Bless you for this.

@caretaker-au announced that @eruto and @mintyfreshdoodles, two major members of the Caretaker of the Ruins team, are going on September 1 on a trip through Europe as a part of their union-regulated break.


Well, I made this as to commemorate before the occasion. 
I know its a little early…but….in case I forget it later…


Bon Voyage!

TF2 Headcanon - “In The Know”

Based on a random headcanon @camiluna27 proposed like an hour ago. And I made this trash.

-Title: IN THE KNOW-

The first thing Engine knew of Spy finding out, was the exact moment his laboratory door exploded inward with the force of a furious frenchman’s foot.

“YOU KNEW!” accused the masked man, blatantly seething.

Engie, trying to diffuse the situation, doesn’t rise to the bait. “Ah know many things, Spah, you mind tellin’ me which thing you’re on about?”

“Zhe bushman has been defiling my SON! And I am zhe last on zhe base to know about zhis-… zhis-… blatant manipulation of a minor?!” Spy cries, furious, but perhaps not finding quite the right words in English.

Amused, but patient, Engie puts down his tools before responding. “Now, see here Spook the kid’s nearly thirty he ain’t no minor-”

“Physically, per'aps, but–” interjects Spy, before Engie can talk over him again.

“…-and he’s a tad immature at times but it don’t mean he can’t make his own decisions. The kid knows what he’s on about, and ah’m getting the impression it’s more about the who, than the fact he’s in a relationship with another man…”

“Well of course that does not matter, it would be ‘ypocritical to scorn such a union, but my point is zhat of all zhe men 'ere… 'e chooses zhe one man who likes to fling PISS at people for fun!” stresses the exasperated Spy, hands flailing as he tried to impress on the stocky Texan the gravity of the situation.

“Mmmm, ah know you two don’t see eye-to-eye but Sniper’s a good man and Scout couldn’t have done much better -or worse, come to think of it- outta the people here. Least it ain’t BLU’s Sniper…” he gets the dig in there, because who could resist.

The horrified expression on Spy’s face was worth it. “Mon dieu… per'aps we should thank god for small miracles zhen, I could not attend a wedding where zhey replace confetti with jarate…”

Engie snorts. “Now where'n the hell’d ya get that idea, Spook?”

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