teacher-salaries

I’m so tired of how Coach is always portrayed as this huge homophobic asswipe of a father to Bitty. Like yes, Coach is a southern man who loves football and Bitty is afraid of telling his father that he’s gay. But like I’m so tired of Coach being written as disowning his son and all of this other stuff. Like in canon, Coach is supportive.
Bitty did figure skating from ages 7-14, and the only reason he stopped was because they moved and the commute to train would be too much. Coach encouraged him in that. Coach went to his competitions. Coach paid for it. And figure skating is NOT cheap, especially for a family who is living off of a teacher’s salary.
Coach got a new job at a different school so they had to move before Bitty’s freshmen year of high school. Why would Coach do that? Maybe because his son was locked in a supply closer overnight by the football team, Coach’s team? Coach’s team locked his son, his tiny, happy, sunshine son in a supply closet. Coach was the head coach of a football team, and at his new school he was still a head coach. Do you know how hard that is? Coach probably started looking for a new position the moment bitty said “the football team did it.” Because his only son was being terrorized by the boys on his team.
Coach never came to Samwell, it was always Suzanne. Because Coach is a high school teacher. And the head coach of a football team. During summer and fall, he is in full swing of football, and can’t leave Madison.
Coach and Suzanne suspect that Bitty is gay, but since Bitty hasn’t said anything, they won’t either.
I just want Coach to be written as a confused, but supportive dad, and who loves his son more than anything but doesn’t know how to show it.

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******Hey guys, I have an important post.********

If you’ve been following me, you know that my family’s financial situation is very bad right now. My mom is a single mother on a low teacher’s salary, taking an expensive college AQ course to possibly up her salary (though that’s not guaranteed). We have three dogs, who have various health problems that are very expensive, and I have health problems and medications myself that aren’t all covered. My estranged father, who abused and stalked (and still stalks) me, has illegally stopped paying child support for me, and we will have to go to court over it, meaning a lawyer we can’t afford. Our car is constantly having expensive problems and we can’t pay most of our bills anymore. I’ve been trying to get a job for a long time to help with this but because I should have graduated high school by now and haven’t (I’m in an alternative education plan, here’s a post explaining all that), nobody will hire me. (It doesn’t help that I have a severe anxiety disorder and can barely leave my house as of right now.) We can’t buy groceries anymore, my nana is paying for all our food and other expenses, all my mom’s credit cards are maxed out and her bank account is essentially empty- she already emptied her retirement fund completely. Our small house that we rent is no longer something we can afford and it’s a matter of time before we lose it. Because of the lack of child support, we will be homeless and have to go live in one room of my nana’s house, which is unfair to her, but also our dogs, and unfortunately me because she criticizes just about everything about me and it would be a very bad place for me to be every day. As of right now, my mom and I are just trying to make it through the next month, day by day. We’re doing everything we can to get money, hoping that if we can just make our rent for a month or two longer and manage to go to court and get my child support payments back, then we would have enough money to get a cheap apartment. This is the goal. We’re having a huge garage sale and selling much of our other stuff, I’m babysitting as much as I can and my mom is probably going to get a job waitress-ing for the month of August until her work and college course start up, and I am still desperately trying to get hired somewhere.

But, the point of this post!!!!! I am selling many of my clothes, shoes, jewelry and make-up to help contribute to our savings jar. There’s nothing over $20, almost all of it has never been worn, and in my opinion it’s all very cute!

I’m really begging you guys to please check it out and see if there’s anything you like and/or can afford, and if not, please please please reblog this to spread it around, every penny counts right now and we could use this so so much, both my mom and I haven’t really slept in weeks, we’re so stressed out knowing any day now we won’t have a home.

Here is the link to my store, it means the world to me if you help us, no matter how little the cost. All of it is going towards keeping us stable.

Most teachers pay for their own graduate school and ongoing professional training, and over 92 percent buy supplies for their students out of their own pockets. But over the past few years, we’ve seen over 60 percent of teachers working second jobs, dining with their children at food banks, and even selling their blood to make ends meet. Examples of such financial stress and strain can be found in every state in the country; quality teachers are walking away from the profession, and salaries are part of the reason they leave.

Is this the way we want any of our teachers to live? Is this what we think will lead students to higher levels of achievement?
thenation.com
Teachers Are Working for Uber Just to Keep a Foothold in the Middle Class
Matt Barry teaches history and economics to eleventh and twelfth graders at Live Oak High School, a public school in a suburb of San Jose, California. At 32, he’s in his ninth year on the job, teaching 35 students in each class.

Yet beneath this feel-good veneer [of helping teachers], there’s a far more troubling reality: Teachers like Matt Barry are “asked to do more with less” because the public, and the politicians who represent us, don’t value teachers enough to pay them more.

I was listening to this on WBEZ this morning and it hit me. Hard. After I got a new car a few months ago, I briefly considered driving for Lyft as well.

This article poses the question young(ish) teachers have, wondering if they can actually “set up shop” in the communities they teach in. I teach on the Northside of Chicago, in an apartment nestled in a neighborhood where the houses are anywhere between $800,000-$1.5 million. Chicago Public School teachers are also required to live in the city limits, (with a few noted exceptions) rather than some of the cheaper suburbs. I can easily say I could not raise a family in the community I work in on my CPS paycheck. 

As we approach a possible strike looking more and more likely, I keep the Lyft sign-up page bookmarked. I can’t imagine how I will handle the guilt of driving when I should be grading or building curriculum; maybe Matt Barry will do a follow-up.

For the last five years, one charter middle school in Manhattan has been conducting a radical experiment in doing exactly that. The Equity Project pays its teachers a salary of $125,000 a year, with extra bonuses based on performance. It also expects a lot more from them, including longer hours and slightly larger classes, four weeks of professional development a year, and regular reviews once hired.

The result? According to the Wall Street Journal, the first long-term study to evaluate the school shows that its unusual model is producing results.

Teachers Get Paid Way Too Much...oh wait...

Teachers’ hefty salaries are driving up taxes, and they only work 9 or 10 months a year! It’s time we put things in perspective and pay them for what they do - babysit! We can get that for minimum wage. That’s right. Let’s give them $3.00 an hour and only the hours they worked; not any of that silly planning time, or any time they spend before or after school. That would be $19.50 a day (7:45 to 3:00 PM with 45 min. off for lunch and plan– that equals 6 ½ hours). Each parent should pay $19.50 a day for these teachers to baby-sit their children. Now how many students do they teach in a day…maybe 30? So that’s $19.50 x 30 = $585.00 a day. However, remember they only work 180 days a year!!! I am not going to pay them for any vacations. LET’S SEE…. That’s $585 X 180= $105,300 per year. What about those special education teachers and the ones with Master’s degrees? Well, we could pay them minimum wage ($7.75), and just to be fair, round it off to $8.00 an hour. That would be $8 X 6 ½ hours X 30 children X 180 days = $280,800 per year. Wait a minute – there’s something wrong here! There sure is! The average teacher’s salary (nation wide) is $50,000. $50,000/180 days = $277.77/per day/30 students=$9.25/6.5 hours = $1.42 per hour per student–a very inexpensive baby-sitter and they even EDUCATE your kids! WHAT A DEAL!!!! Make a teacher smile; re-post this to show appreciation for all educators!

Teachers’ hefty salaries are driving up taxes, and they only work nine or ten months a year! It’s time we put things in perspective and pay them for what they do – babysit!

We can get that for less than minimum wage.

That’s right. Let’s give them $3.00 an hour and only the hours they worked; not any of that silly planning time, or any time they spend before or after school. That would be $19.50 a day (7:45 to 3:00 PM with 45 min. off for lunch and planning – that equals 6-½ hours).

So each parent should pay $19.50 a day for these teachers to baby-sit their children. Now how many students do they teach in a day… maybe 30? So that’s $19.50 x 30 = $585 a day.

However, remember they only work 180 days a year!!! I am not going to pay them for any vacations.

LET’S SEE….

That’s $585 x 180 = $105,300 per year. (Hold on! My calculator needs new batteries).

What about those special education teachers and the ones with Master’s degrees? Well, we could pay them minimum wage ($7.75), and just to be fair, round it off to $8.00 an hour. That would be $8 x 6-½ hours x 30 children x 180 days = $280,800 per year.

Wait a minute – there’s something wrong here! There sure is!

The average teacher’s salary (nationwide) is $50,000.

$50,000/180 days = $277.77 per day / 30 students = $9.25 / 6.5 hours = $1.42 per hour per student – a very inexpensive baby-sitter (and they even EDUCATE your kids!)

WHAT A DEAL!!!!

Make a teacher smile; repost this to show appreciation for all educators.

In discussions of teacher pay, people “tend to look at the starting salary and they tend to look at the ending salary,” said Kate Walsh, president of the council. “And there’s very little attention to lifetime earnings.” If school districts want teachers to commit to the profession, she said, they need to make sure that teachers can reach middle-class earnings early enough in their careers.
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River Song will be found in her bunk.

In which River Song is tired of having to save the Universe yet another time.

Linking teacher salaries to their students’ test scores, whether they have national certification, and any local leadership duties they take up are also destined to flop. No matter the compensation scheme, these strategies fail to acknowledge the impact of school culture and climate on work satisfaction—which often takes precedence over pay for experienced teachers. After all, thousands of teachers opt to work in private schools for far less compensation, largely because conditions tend to be more favorable for teachers.

Some of the schools serving America’s neediest children lose over half of their teaching staff every five years.