teacher-salaries

Teachers Get Paid Way Too Much...oh wait...

Teachers’ hefty salaries are driving up taxes, and they only work 9 or 10 months a year! It’s time we put things in perspective and pay them for what they do - babysit! We can get that for minimum wage. That’s right. Let’s give them $3.00 an hour and only the hours they worked; not any of that silly planning time, or any time they spend before or after school. That would be $19.50 a day (7:45 to 3:00 PM with 45 min. off for lunch and plan– that equals 6 ½ hours). Each parent should pay $19.50 a day for these teachers to baby-sit their children. Now how many students do they teach in a day…maybe 30? So that’s $19.50 x 30 = $585.00 a day. However, remember they only work 180 days a year!!! I am not going to pay them for any vacations. LET’S SEE…. That’s $585 X 180= $105,300 per year. What about those special education teachers and the ones with Master’s degrees? Well, we could pay them minimum wage ($7.75), and just to be fair, round it off to $8.00 an hour. That would be $8 X 6 ½ hours X 30 children X 180 days = $280,800 per year. Wait a minute – there’s something wrong here! There sure is! The average teacher’s salary (nation wide) is $50,000. $50,000/180 days = $277.77/per day/30 students=$9.25/6.5 hours = $1.42 per hour per student–a very inexpensive baby-sitter and they even EDUCATE your kids! WHAT A DEAL!!!! Make a teacher smile; re-post this to show appreciation for all educators!

erinandthepurplecrayon asked:

My major is art education. I'm really interested in teaching elementary kids art, but I'm not sure how well I'll like it when it comes down to it, and I don't want to be poor forever. What are the perks of being an art teacher? Is it worth it in the long run?

We’ve actually covered a lot of information about art education majors.

You can view them with these links:

I think those should cover all your bases @erinandthepurplecrayon

homes.yahoo.com
From high school teacher to his own private island
Math teacher Mark Pentecost took a side gig to make an extra $500 a month. Now he's a CEO who just paid a record $14.5 million for Florida's Little Bokeelia Island.

Can we just talk about how Yahoo describes this former teacher’s story as a “rags to riches” tale? Yet teachers are told that we get paid too much? And it all started with a side job he took on during teaching in order to make more money. 

kayanluvv asked:

Hello:] First of all your blog is amazing!:) and second I wanted to ask your opinion on what life someone persuing a teaching career can expect?do they earn good money to make an OK living? Can they pay their college loans if any without any trouble?

That depends a lot on three things:

  1. Location- Your salary is going to vary among different regions across the nation.
  2. The University you attend- If choose a particularlly expensive school (like a private or out of state university) that will obiously affect how much debt you will have.
  3. How long you’re in school-If you take longer to graduate or decide to go to grad school, tuition bills and loans can add up pretty quickly. But you will earn higher wages with an advaned degree.

Resources:

washingtonpost.com
How much teachers get paid — state by state

Map shows data for 2013 that represent the estimated average annual salary of teachers in public elementary and secondary schools.

Other variables to be taken into account: Cost of living and teacher experience. Generally speaking, novice teachers are paid less. A state with a higher preponderance of newer teachers and a lower retention rate could wind up with a low average salary.

New Mexico, where I teach, is on the low end of this scale. But the cost of living in my area is quite low compared to many places. Still…none of us teachers are really in it for the money - how could we be? The money isn’t very good. 

No offense taken :) I just wanted to be clear about my personal situation and give some connection to where some negativity stems from.

Pay is not as low for teachers here with official certified teaching positions (i.e., persons not in my situation), but I would definitely say that they are underpaid for the amount of work that goes into teaching, lesson planning, professional development, parental involvement, parent/teacher conferences, taking observations, giving assessments, grading papers, and that whole “your work is never done” feeling. That’s not counting the pressure teachers feel to meet standardized testing benchmarks and teachers who deal with other issues based on their regions and communities (poverty, gangs, crime, abuse, etc.). 

I hope better things will be here for us in the next school year! I have preliminary interviews in a couple of weeks for potential positions in our district. Working this hard for so little (salary-wise) may just pay off!

Good luck!

Insight into Teacher Salaries

“Are you sick of high paid teachers? Teachers’ hefty salaries are driving up taxes, and they only work 9 or 10 months a year! It’s time we put things in perspective and pay them for what they do - baby sit! We can get that for less than minimum wage.

Teachers should only be paid less than minimum wage. They are nothing more than glorified babysitters. And we should pay them the same way. 

That’s right. Let’s give them $3.00 an hour and only the hours they worked; not any of that silly planning time, or any time they spend before or after school. That would be $19.50 a day (7:45 to 3:00 PM
with 45 min. off for lunch and plan — that equals 6 ½ hours).

Each parent should pay $19.50 a day for these teachers to baby-sit their children.

Now how many do they teach in day…maybe 30? So that’s $19.50 x 30 = $585.00 a day. However, remember they only work 180 days a year!!! I am not going to pay them for any vacations.

LET’S SEE…. That’s $585 X 180= $105,300 per year. (Hold on! My calculator needs new batteries).

What about those special education teachers and the ones with Master’s degrees? Well, we could pay them minimum wage ($7.75), and just to be fair, round it off to $8.00 an hour. That would be $8 X 6 ½ hours X 30 children
X 180 days = $280,800 per year.

Wait a minute — there’s something wrong here! There sure is!

And it ain’t teacher pay. 

The average teacher’s salary (nation wide) is $50,000. $50,000/180 days = $277.77/per day/30 students=$9.25/6.5 hours = $1.42 per hour per student–a very inexpensive baby-sitter and they even EDUCATE your
kids!)

Make a teacher smile; reblog this to show appreciation.” - I’m sure many people have seen this by now. BUT WAIT, THERE’S MORE!

Notes: the average salary is actually well above where many teachers’ starting salaries fall. The average is the salary it takes us at least 15+ years to achieve in many states. The only place in the US where the average STARTING salary was above that average in 2012-2013 was in the District of Columbia. Here’s a link to that info.

Keep in mind that an average starting salary doesn’t always reflect what a first-year teacher would be getting. For example, I worked in Ohio last year, which was my first year teaching, and my salary was below the average starting for that state the year before.

Another thing to keep in mind is that while the average is above $50,000, there are also things called step freezes and salary freezes within the teaching profession. Theoretically, you are supposed to move up a “step” for every year you have taught. You start at a Bachelor’s 0 (or Master’s, if that’s what you have) and work up from there, achieving Bachelor’s 1 after having taught a year and so on. With every “step” comes a small pay increase. However, there are quite a few districts throughout the nation who are going through such massive budgeting problems that some teachers aren’t getting to move up the appropriate “steps” every year. Not only does this affect pay, but it also messes with retirement. That means that instead of teaching until they’re 65 and getting all their benefits for retiring, many teachers are having to work beyond that mark to get their full benefits. Hence some of those older teachers that many people wish would just quit.

I also mentioned salary freezes. In most districts, there is a teacher’s union established to try to fight for the rights of the teachers. Every so many years, a school district and the union for that district are supposed to convene and come to an agreement on raises, or increases in the salaries for each “step” on the ladder. When an agreement can’t be reached (which is more often than people might think, since districts don’t really want to add more to their budgets), there is a “salary freeze,” where there is no increase in the salary for the different steps. For example, say that in year 1, a Bachelor’s 0 is at $31,000 (meaning that’s the starting salary in that district for a teacher with absolutely no teaching experience). The next year (year 2), according to the agreement set forth by the district and the union, Bachelor’s 0 moves up to $31,675. So a brand new teacher in year 2 would receive more starting out than a brand new teacher in year 1 (which is to be expected, due to the cost of living going up and such). Then, the agreement runs out and it’s time to meet again to come to an agreement for years 3-5. A decision cannot be reached, so until further notice, Bachelor’s 0 is still $31,675 for year 3. And it will stay that way until an agreement is reached. Meanwhile, the cost of living is going up and new teachers can’t afford to work in that district because of the low pay. Or, they can’t find a higher paying job, and are spiraling further into debt even though they have a job and should be able to pay their bills.

Additionally, just like in other jobs, just because you are hired one year does not mean you will be the next. If the district has to make cuts in teachers, that means that you could be out of a job. If the district has any reason to think you’ve done something wrong, you could be out of a job. Job security isn’t necessarily a term that is synonymous with the teaching profession.

So, throw in the years of step freezes, salary freezes, and the potential loss of your job due to being cut because of financial constraints for the district, and it could take you more than 20 years to reach that average of $50,000.

Also, not to mention the fact that some people may laugh at 30 being the number of students in that equation, but it happens. When I was solo student-teaching, I was responsible for a class of 28 students. And I had to meet all of their individual needs.

So, uh, yeah. Teachers need to be paid more. But that should be a duh for everyone. If you need more proof, see my other rant for the day, where I have outlined some other points, including “breaks,” hours worked per week, etc. Here it is. Other lovely denizens of tumblr started the conversation, but I took it on the rant train and went to town.

And if you want to know what else teachers make, give this a click right here.

American Schools Spending Less On Minority Students Through Federal Loophole: Report

Schools that enroll 90 percent or more non-white students spend $733 less per pupil per year than schools that enroll 90 percent or more white students, according to a report released Wednesday by the Center for American Progress released Wednesday.

These “racially isolated” schools make up one-third of the country’s schools. Nationwide, schools spend $334 more on every white student than on every nonwhite student.

According to the report, titled “Unequal Education,” the traditional claim that variation in schools’ per-pupil spending stems almost entirely from different property-tax bases between school districts does not hold true. Rather, variation within a district can be largely attributed to district budgeting policies that fail to take into account teacher salaries. For instance, new teachers who often start out in high-need schools that enroll many students of color earn less money than veteran teachers located in more affluent, whiter areas.

“This leads to significantly lower per-pupil spending in schools with the highest concentrations of nonwhite students,” report author Ary Spatig-Amerikaner writes.

Spatig-Amerikaner also examines Title I of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, a federal policy that is supposed to guard against within-district inequities. In order to receive Title I money, school districts must provide comparable educational services to both their high-poverty and low-poverty schools. However, the law stipulates districts exclude teacher salary differentials tied to experience when determining comparability compliance. Teacher salaries, of course, are often contingent on experience, and the author points out how this problem has frequently been referred to as the “comparability loophole.”

According to the report, high-minority schools, on average, boast 605 students. Thus, the average school would see an increase of $443,000 if per-pupil spending was brought to the same level as those schools that enroll very few nonwhite students.

As Spatig-Amerikaner reiterated in a press call to discuss her findings, this amount is enough to pay the average salary of 12 additional new teachers or nine veteran teachers – a move that would go a long way in drastically reducing class size.

Also participating in the conference call, Rep. Chaka Fattah (D-Pa.) said the study adds to the “whole body of empirical data that shows that young people of color and poor kids in general are being shortchanged due to the way we fund schools.”

“We shouldn’t have the kids needing the most help, being provided the least resources,” he said.

The report argues that Congress should close the comparability loophole, and outlines how the requirement should be changed in three phases when the Elementary and Secondary Education Act is reauthorized. According to the author, this change in federal law would affect about 3,386 districts, where 77 percent of all students attend school.

Fattah has proposed a bill that would do away with the federal loophole, and acknowledged the major hurdle to moving forward right now is the fact that theElementary and Secondary Education Act has yet to be reauthorized.

In reading other people’s work, Spatig-Amerikaner said she found that district officials often do not realize that this problem of inequitable per-pupil spending even exists. They think that by providing the same number of teachers and the same student-teacher ratio at all of their schools, they are providing equitable services – when in fact they should be looking at the total dollars spent at each school.

“A lot of school personnel have never had this data, so it’s almost not their fault that they don’t realize that this is a problem,” she said.

The data in question is school-level expenditure data – including teacher salaries – that was collected by the U.S. Department of Education for the first time ever in 2009, and released to the public in 2011.

“Many districts aren’t really aware that this problem exists, because they haven’t had the data until now,” Spatig-Amerikaner said.

I gave myself ten minutes on tumblr,

noooow I gotta edit my paper for academic writing. I don’t feel like writing another 2 pages on how overpaid teachers are, ‘cause it’s so ridiculous people actually believe this.

While writing the first few pages in the computer lab, some dude looked at my computer screen and then pointed and nodded his head. I took out my earphones, and I said “I actually disagree, I have to write from another perspective..” “You do know some teachers are making three digit salaries?” “Not a lot, but yeah, and they don’t deserve it? I plan on getting a Master’s degree, maybe a Doctorate later in life… I think with as much time and dedication I want to put into my career I deserve a salary I can raise a family on.”

He shut the fuck up and I went back to listening to Tool.

I’ll take that as a win.

Taking Teachers to the Top

By Nate Harding

I am guilty. For years, I, too, failed to give the profession of teaching the respect and admiration it not only deserves, but also now so desperately needs. Teachers across the nation change our children’s lives each and every day, yet as a society we continue to devalue them with dismal salaries and unpromising social status.

Just one year ago, I graduated from one of the top public high schools in Southern California in a community that not only expected each graduate to “succeed” in college and beyond, but also demanded it. Today, a large majority of my classmates are currently pursuing college degrees in hopes of becoming doctors, dentists, engineers, or businesspeople. None of them have expressed a desire to teach. Where I’m from, yearning to serve as an educator is seen as a waste of talent and, moreover, a waste of resources. Teachers are rarely success stories in San Marino.

I believe these unfavorable perceptions of teachers extend far beyond my high school. Across the nation, teachers receive salaries comparable to the hourly wages of your local Wal-Mart greeters. Though I’ve been brought up to view my education as an investment in my future, our society continually labels the U.S. education system as a drain of resources rather than as an investment in the development of one of our greatest resources: human capital.

At the beginning of the eleventh grade, I visited my elementary school to say hello to my old teachers. I discovered that only my gym teacher remained. The individuals who had provided six critical years of my academic and social development had all vanished within a period of five years. A week later, I uncovered a similar story when I visited my middle school. I was dumbfounded, but honestly, what incentives did those teachers have to stay? Furthermore, what led them to become teachers in the first place?

With this question in mind, I was shocked to discover the caliber of Teach For America’s 2014 corps members. As an associate for TFA-Charlotte’s Strategy, Talent, and Operations staff this summer, I had the opportunity to meet many brilliant, passionate, and enthusiastic young corps members this week as they prepare to begin their service as teachers this upcoming school year. My interactions with these new teachers left me both humbled and inspired, and I was grateful for their willingness to sacrifice their time and energy for the benefit of countless children throughout the Charlotte-Mecklenburg School System.

But in a society that so frequently diminishes the value of educators, what attracted these young, accomplished individuals to enter the realm of teaching? Furthermore, is it correct to perceive their decision to teach as a sacrifice?

Perhaps these questions are related. Oftentimes, the decisions people most value are inherently tied to the concept of sacrifice. I think one of Teach For America’s best recruitment techniques is marketing the concept that teaching is an opportunity to use your individual talents to affect positive change in students’ lives. Unfortunately, however, I think that our society’s capitalist mindset has convinced our most promising youth that teaching requires a charitable mentality and does not beget “success.” Success in today’s world primarily connotes money and power, two elements rarely associated with teachers. So how do we provide teachers with the money and power necessary to be considered successful in today’s world?

Solutions to this question need to be both cultural and political in nature. Empowered teachers emerge when their communities grant them agency, but this agency can be realized only when everyone—parents, teachers, principals, politicians, business leaders, and more—identifies as stakeholders in the future of learning and continuously engages in conversation with one another. If and when this synergy is achieved, I believe communities of all sizes will generate the funding and foster the culture of reverence needed to attract and retain quality teachers. These problems may be complex, but it’s clear that we will all need to work together to find answers that truly work.

Stop using their loyalty and integrity to hold them hostage to this district,” Meyer said. “If you’re unwilling to give them what they could make elsewhere be honest and upfront with them. Let them know where they stand in regards to upcoming salaries and compensation in April, not September, after they have been forced to sign a contract in June.
—  Our PLTW teacher who is leaving at the end of this year.

Teachers’ hefty salaries are driving up taxes, and they only work nine or ten months a year! It’s time we put things in perspective and pay them for what they do – babysit!

We can get that for less than minimum wage.

That’s right. Let’s give them $3.00 an hour and only the hours they worked; not any of that silly planning time, or any time they spend before or after school. That would be $19.50 a day (7:45 to 3:00 PM with 45 min. off for lunch and planning – that equals 6-½ hours).

So each parent should pay $19.50 a day for these teachers to baby-sit their children. Now how many students do they teach in a day… maybe 30? So that’s $19.50 x 30 = $585 a day.

However, remember they only work 180 days a year!!! I am not going to pay them for any vacations.

LET’S SEE….

That’s $585 x 180 = $105,300 per year. (Hold on! My calculator needs new batteries).

What about those special education teachers and the ones with Master’s degrees? Well, we could pay them minimum wage ($7.75), and just to be fair, round it off to $8.00 an hour. That would be $8 x 6-½ hours x 30 children x 180 days = $280,800 per year.

Wait a minute – there’s something wrong here! There sure is!

The average teacher’s salary (nationwide) is $50,000.

$50,000/180 days = $277.77 per day / 30 students = $9.25 / 6.5 hours = $1.42 per hour per student – a very inexpensive baby-sitter (and they even EDUCATE your kids!)

WHAT A DEAL!!!!

Make a teacher smile; repost this to show appreciation for all educators.