teacher incoming

Do you want to talk about how underpaid teachers are?

fandomsandfeminism:

life-grips:

fandomsandfeminism:

I get paid $44,000 a year, give or take, which is actually higher than many districts in my area. 

Assume, for a moment, that my job was…just babysitting. (It’s not, of course, but let’s assume.) And Let’s assume that I’m a REALLY REALLY cheap babysitter. Let’s say I charge $5 an hour per kid. Below minimum wage. 

Let’s ASSUME that I’m only at school from 8am to 4pm. (I’m not. I’m really there from 7 to at LEAST 5, sometimes later, but we’ll assume.) So 8 hours a day, per kid. 

Let’s ASSUME that I have an average of 25 kids in my room at a time. (I don’t. Last year my largest class was 29 students. The Science teachers regularly had in the mid 30s. But we’re assuming)

Let’s say that the only days I actually get paid are days when there are children in the classroom- 180. (Not including staff development or summer training or work I do on the weekends.) 

$5 and hour X 8 hours a  day x 25 kids at a time x 180 days in a year = $180,000

If I got paid $5 per hour per kid to baby sit, I should get $180,000.

I get $44,000. 

Be nice to your teachers. 

THIS shit is important. Reform this, not minimum wage

No. Reform BOTH. Put everyone on a basic universal income system. Raise the standard of living for everyone. 

anonymous asked:

Hiya. Like I've said before amazing blog and the site I probably use the most ! :D Just wondering where you were from and if not from Ireland would you ever want to go there? Perhaps to visit cork ! :p Also tell me the most randomest fact you have heard about Cillian Thanks for your time. Much love.

Thank you so much! There are several of us running ohfuckyeahcillianmurphy and fuckyeahpeakyblinders. In Europe (not Ireland though) and the U.S.

Random facts. I love these shared by a schoolmate of his on a message board years ago:

1) He is hilariously funny - he and his best friends (and fellow band mates) Eoin O’Sullivan & Bob Jackson used to have everyone gasping for breath. One episode that springs to mind was where he stuffed a cutting from an old fur coat (possibly lifted from the art room - sorry Franko) down his shirt pretending like he had an extremely hairy chest… very funny when you are 13 years old. Of course he left his shirt open to catch the attention of the incoming teacher whose reaction was surely lively!!
2) Everybody liked him
3) He was very very bright (intelligent). This was evident both through the creativity of his humour as well as quite simply his exam results
4) His band used to play lunchtime concerts at our school (I remember one song I really liked which was called “Supermarkets and Supermen”). At the time the band was called Saradaze (and later Sons of Mr Greenjeans i think… memory is getting a little hazy)
5) Used to refer to his friend’s woolen coat as “the sheep”
6) This point is expressed as if I were still a kid… “He was very cool!”
——-

Cillian - when you do read this, I am sure it won’t bother you beyond a natural pang of modesty… We are all delighted to see you succeed.

Lots of random facts/Cillian stories in tagged/aboutCM and tagged/flashbackfriday <— have you seen the photos of Cillian knitting?

anonymous asked:

Do you ever wonder what Cillian was like in high school??

Cillian at 16

And some stories a schoolmate shared on a message board years ago:

1) He is hilariously funny - he and his best friends (and fellow band mates) Eoin O’Sullivan [in the above photo btw] & Bob Jackson used to have everyone gasping for breath. One episode that springs to mind was where he stuffed a cutting from an old fur coat (possibly lifted from the art room - sorry Franko) down his shirt pretending like he had an extremely hairy chest… very funny when you are 13 years old. Of course he left his shirt open to catch the attention of the incoming teacher whose reaction was surely lively!!
2) Everybody liked him
3) He was very very bright (intelligent). This was evident both through the creativity of his humour as well as quite simply his exam results
4) His band used to play lunchtime concerts at our school (I remember one song I really liked which was called “Supermarkets and Supermen”). At the time the band was called Saradaze (and later Sons of Mr Greenjeans i think… memory is getting a little hazy)
5) Used to refer to his friend’s woolen coat as “the sheep”
6) This point is expressed as if I were still a kid… “He was very cool!”
——-

Cillian - when you do read this, I am sure it won’t bother you beyond a natural pang of modesty… We are all delighted to see you succeed.

Pretty perfect?!!

Help a trans teen!

Hey, I am a high school teacher at the lowest income school in the district in which I teach. Most of my kids are on free or reduced lunch.

One of my students, age 17, whose identity I am not sharing at the moment, has recently come out to me as trans. She is wicked smart and incredibly courageous. She really is a great student and I’m so glad she is not only in my class, but felt safe coming out to me (which she has not yet done with her family).

Being very low income, she has no money for clothes or make up or anything she needs. I’m hoping that Tumblr can help me help her.

I am looking for resource recommendations, as well as any clothes (I’m not sure of size, but she is very tall and likely a 12-16), unused makeup, or anything else you can spare.

Please take a moment to either reblog or send me any info you may have.

If you would like to send something, please message me. Thank you all so much.

Go Fund Me share

Please reblog if you cannot assist. I’m asking as many people as possible to get the word out.

The very dear @famousflowerof-manhattan needs assistance with rather unexpected medical bills and mental health support. As most of us know, teachers don’t get the income and insurance they deserve.

Her site is gofundme.com/3wccbnd8

Please, friends, take a moment to donate, or at least reblog.

The Giving Trees

A few months ago, I got into a fruitless Facebook debate with a high school friend I unfriended ages ago because I was sick of his ignorant posts and comments. An obvious teacher-hater, he was railing against our “high salaries.” I told him that I had no issue with my own salary, but that I am sick of being demonized for it when I have a graduate degree and certifications and all of the other expensive things you need before you step into a classroom. He stopped commenting, which I saw as a small victory.

I forgot about the debate until this week. It’s the holiday season, which brings on a lot of fundraisers, donation requests, and food/toy drives. Since Monday, I’ve received e-mails or flyers about a PTA fundraiser, a Spring chocolate fundraiser, two food drives, two toy drives, a union donation, a charity event, and a gift card fund for needy students. This is along with an ugly sweater contest, a faculty potluck lunch, and dues for a faculty committee, which all ultimately cost money. 

I have no complaints about my salary, but I can barely afford two or three of these, much less all of them. With a mortgage and bills… it’s overwhelming. I am keeping my head above the water, but added up, these things could drown me.

It’s all part of being a teacher in a low income district. Throughout the year, my colleagues bust their butts trying to give our kids the things that they need to be happy, healthy, and successful. This is far from a complaint about anyone’s efforts. I think all of these things are absolutely amazing and it’s part of what I love about my district and my community. I’ve never taught or lived anywhere that rallied together to make sure families had food and gifts for the holidays, or raised money to give kids free or discounted field trips. I started building my life here partially because of this selflessness and charity.

I just can’t afford to be that charitable right now, and it bothers me for a lot of reasons. 

Naturally, I want to contribute more and I can’t, which makes me feel awful. It’s in my nature to help, but I am also very budget-minded, so those two things are often at war within my mind. I don’t want to tell my colleagues that I can’t afford it, but I don’t want to deal with the disappointment on their faces when I say I won’t be participating. 

Most of all, there’s a small part of me that wonders if there are any other careers out there where people are expected to constantly give so much. When I was a bartender for 9.5 years, I bought shoes and shirts every so often. That was it. As a teacher, I am always going into my pockets. The things I listed above are in addition to yearly union dues, other fundraisers through the year, retirement dinners, certification updates, extra classes, donating time for extra help, events, and/or field trips, and SCHOOL SUPPLIES. I put that in caps, as it seems to be the never-ending cost to us. 

On top of that, we have to battle the public for a livable salary. When I see bailouts for large banks, militarized police force, equipment bought for the military that they admit they don’t need, corporate tax loopholes, and all of these other taxpayer-funded luxuries, it makes me angry that we are demonized for our salaries and still give so much to make up for the fact that public education is so woefully underfunded. I should add social welfare to that list, since we often have to raise money and hold food drives because food stamps, minimum wage rates, and unemployment aren’t cutting it for low-income families anymore.

One year, I would like to add up the money I pay to be a teacher and a contributing member of my community. Even further, I would like to add up all of the things I am expected to contribute to and compare that to my “exorbitant” salary. I think the results would be staggering.

We do this for the kids though. When it all comes down to it, if things have to absolutely be this way, I would still give. It doesn’t stop me from buying cranberry sauce and stuffing for a holiday food basket or going into my own pocket for a student’s field trip or giving my time to chaperone a dance. We’re going to do these things regardless.

It would simply be nice to not have to prove our worth.

one of the most amaze parts of going back to school, is watching teachers bring box after box of supplies to their classrooms.

in our school district, every classroom gets; student desks & chairs, one file cabinet, and one shelf, and one set of textbooks- anything and everything else, must be found/bought by the teacher themselves.

each teacher receives a grand total of $0 dollars towards their room.  All of our paychecks are abysmally low (a single 2% raise in a decade), yet our teachers make these purchases out of their pockets and the kindness of their hearts. 

warms my cockles!

US education data: 8,000 toddlers suspended from preschool

PoliticoNew data from the U.S. Department of Education shows more than 8,000 3- and 4-year-olds were suspended at least once during the 2011 school year. Experts say the number is small, but significant. 

The stat is part of a flood of information from the Obama administration that examines race and equity issues in schools through dozens of data points, from pay for teachers in low-income schools to the percentage of black students taking AP calculus. …

Gaping disparities in how school discipline has been meted out has long been a department focus, but the new data show that those racial gaps start early: Black children constitute 18 percent of all kids attending preschool but account for 48 percent of all students suspended more than once, the new data show.

The data “shines a clear, unbiased light” on which areas are and aren’t delivering on equity in education, Education Secretary Arne Duncan said.

Saving Place

The second I stepped into my job three and a half years ago, my life changed forever on a lot of different levels. First, I didn’t realize that I’d eventually want to spend my career there. I never imagined that I would stay beyond the maternity leave to tenure-track to actual tenure. I never would have imagined that my future house was a five minute drive away. But most of all, walking into a low-income school district after both going to and working in wealthier districts is definitely a shock to the system. 

It changed me as a person, I think, in a really positive way. Seeing children at massive disadvantages humanizes poverty. I hate admitting that that is what it takes to really see the issue, but it’s true. I was never one to spew hatred at the poor. I was probably a bit detached from it, sheltered from the reality of what much of our country lives in. Seeing it in front of you though… for me, I no longer could ignore it, nor could I judge the decisions of anyone living in poverty.

From my own background to my career now, I’m always noting the major differences between the districts I have spent time in. Besides the obvious money discrepancies and level of parental involvement, the major difference for me has been the usage of one particular phrase.

“You can’t save them all.”

On one hand, it’s kind of a no-brainer. Yes, no matter what we do, there will be students who fall through the cracks, who make poor decisions, who wind up in jail, etc. With society’s issues today, those things are an inevitability.  It’s impossible to churn out a perfect group of human beings ready to do amazing things in amazing ways, all while being upstanding citizens. I don’t think I, or any of us for that matter, walked in with that expectation. 

But I never, ever, ever heard this in a wealthier district. Maybe it is said and I just did not hear, but it’s a phrase I hear constantly. To me, it’s a verbal shrug of the shoulders, an unfeeling, indifferent response to showing a little extra care to those who probably need that care more than any of us. Anyone who can actually say that was probably never someone in need of saving in some way. Because anyone who’s been there, even regardless of socioeconomic status, would understand that being worthy of someone’s time and energy is special. For some, that bit of kindness sticks with them. 

I bring up the discrepancies between wealthy/low-income districts because hearing it has made me reflect a lot on my home district. There, very few kids needed that boost of help. If they did, it was swept under the rug so not many people knew. Of course we had the kids we knew (based on clothing, usually) didn’t have much. Still, none of us were ever treated like lost causes. We weren’t chained to family reputations or poverty or anything. Meanwhile, by the time some kids get to me, they treat themselves like lost causes. They’re from this family or this place or they can’t pull themselves out of the ruts they’ve put themselves in by acting like bozos. 

The honest truth is that some, maybe even many, will succumb to the self-fulfilling prophecy. They won’t be “saved.” But guess what… neither will a lot of the kids who go to fancier schools with every opportunity at their feet. 

Case in point, some of my own classmates. One died in a drunk driving accident. At least five died of drug overdoses. I know of three who are in jail, though I’d bet that there are many more. Countless ones have been to rehab or are recovering addicts, including one of my best friends growing up. All of them had every opportunity possible, but they messed up. 

People mess up. No matter where they come from, people mess shit up. It happens. It’s inevitable. But to me, it is no reason to sit back and let the one opportunity they have to avoid messing up slip by. I know it’s especially frustrating when the kid is a behavioral issue. I’ve been there, when every trick has been pulled out of the hat and nothing is working. Even if I can’t reach them or I can’t teach them, I always show kindness. I always want to show I care in some small way, even if they don’t give a crap at that moment.

My boss is one who thinks as I do, who is beloved by the staff, but still accused of wearing rose-colored glasses in regards to where some of our children will wind up. She’s too nice, she’s too kind, yadda yadda. The thing is, she doesn’t delude herself into thinking she’s going to save them all. I’m sure that her viewpoint is that if she saves one, trying to save many was worth it. In my own conversations with her, I know that she doesn’t look at it in such a cut and dry way. We’re not giving the “lost causes” a scholarship for a school trip to save them, we’re doing it to give them a life experience. If it inspires bigger things, awesome. If it doesn’t, the child has something he or she will never forget. It’s win-win, even if they never leave the town again, so why not give it to them?

Some might say that this thinking isn’t teaching children the reality of our world, but if we teach them that they’re not worth our time or energy or kindness, what reality will they make of our world? Ultimately, I’m not out to save them all, but I am not out to give up on a single one either.


“It’s the children the world almost breaks who grow up to save it.”- Frank Warren

Many parents of low-income high achievers didn’t go to college, and, when they think of selective schools, they think of the pricey, East Coast elites: Harvard, Yale, Princeton, etc. The obvious conclusion: Out of our league.

But Caroline Hoxby says it’s the wrong conclusion. Selective schools “are cheaper for low-income high achievers than colleges that have fewer resources,” she says. That means potentially paying for mediocrity but going to Harvard or Yale for free.

anonymous asked:

I can't stop watching the video of earnest and adorable Cillian talking about his band. Thank you so much for posting it. I would give anything to have known him back then.

The RTE Archives video. “Earnest and adorable”, exactly! There’s this moment when he looks right into the camera that’s just 

Have posted these before, some stories shared by a classmate from when they were in high school, and yeah, he would have been amazing to know -

1) Cillian is hilariously funny - he and his best friends (and fellow band mates) Eoin O’Sullivan [in the above photo btw] & Bob Jackson used to have everyone gasping for breath. One episode that springs to mind was where he stuffed a cutting from an old fur coat (possibly lifted from the art room - sorry Franko) down his shirt pretending like he had an extremely hairy chest… very funny when you are 13 years old. Of course he left his shirt open to catch the attention of the incoming teacher whose reaction was surely lively!!
2) Everybody liked him
3) He was very very bright (intelligent). This was evident both through the creativity of his humour as well as quite simply his exam results
4) His band used to play lunchtime concerts at our school (I remember one song I really liked which was called “Supermarkets and Supermen”). At the time the band was called Saradaze (and later Sons of Mr Greenjeans i think… memory is getting a little hazy)
5) Used to refer to his friend’s woolen coat as “the sheep”
6) This point is expressed as if I were still a kid… “He was very cool!”
——-

Cillian - when you do read this, I am sure it won’t bother you beyond a natural pang of modesty… We are all delighted to see you succeed.

So I am weeding my library, as one does, and that’s involved sorting it into three very large piles: Sell, donate to charity, donate to a high school library in a low-income community (if you’re a librarian or teacher in a low-income community, email me, especially if you’re in a part of Louisiana affected by flooding and you’re trying to rebuild your collection), recycle because no one will want them*. Today, I dropped off the ‘donate to charity’ and ‘recycle’ books at their respective destinations, and I was struck by the person working at the intake desk at the charity who asked if he could quickly go through the books to see which ones he could accept (i.e. what, if anything, in the stack was actually salable). I said ‘yes of course’ and once I got a sense of his criteria I helped him sort. 

He seemed genuinely astonished that I was totally cool and chill with this and was happy to take the books he didn’t want to dispose of elsewhere. It was a reminder to me that a lot of people treat charitable organisations like waste disposal companies and just dump whatever they want, thus forcing organisations like this one to spend a small fortune on dumpster fees every year for stuff people know no one is going to want. And that people are entitled assholes who think that charities should be grateful for their mismatched socks and broken appliances. 

So like, dude, don’t treat charities as a dump. Sort through your stuff and recycle/throw away things that you know people are not going to be able to sell. If you are bringing a lot of stuff, don’t just slink in and dump it: Let them know so they can have someone come out and assess it (and help you carry it in), or consider making an appointment (some charities prefer that, actually). Disposing of useless donations is actually a pretty big expense for some organisations. Don’t make it harder for them. 

*Before you gasp in horror, we are talking about things like ARCs that are falling apart, severely water-damaged or mold-stained books, things Loki chewed on, books with chunks of missing pages, etc. 

The Great Divide

Despite being a 30-something married-and-mortgaged adult, I don’t have many friends who are parents. My closest friends are married and childless (for now), save for my work best friend, who is a new mom. My only real connection with parenthood is my older sister, someone I am reestablishing a relationship with after 3 years of being estranged. To say that I am out of the loop with parental issues and concerns in relation to education is an understatement. 

A good thing that has come from speaking to my sister again is that I’m now getting the perspective of a non-teacher parent. Ironically, after overhearing a conversation between two moms with kids in districts in two different states while on line for ice cream, my sister brought up a similar subject with me today.

You wouldn’t believe how much it costs me for school supplies.”

I wanted to get on my high horse and say “try me,” since I’m a regular customer at Staples and all local dollar stores all year long, but I figured I would hear her out. And I am glad I did.

She has three children, and she said she’s been asked to provide not just supplies, but specific brands of supplies. Ticonderoga pencils, Expo markers, etc. As a teacher, I know that these brands are the best. But I also know how expensive they are. And as a teacher, I know that our budgets are so tiny for supplies that we often have no other choice but to beg and plead for the parents to help us out. 

It’s really a lose-lose situation, where teachers and school districts are micromanaged by the government, and then forced to pool together with parents to buy the supplies that the government doesn’t want to buy for us, even though we’re all supplying money to the government to provide these things.

(Small aside rant: BUT YES, BUY ANOTHER FIGHTER JET AND MILITARIZE THE POLICE WHILE I BUY THE SHITTY PENCILS FOR YOUR MANDATORY MILLION DOLLAR STANDARDIZED TESTS. /rant over)

The parents I overhead chatting on line for ice cream were comparing experiences. One parent was from New York, where I live. She was buying paper towels, baby wipes, writing utensils, paper, you name it. The other parent was from Pennsylvania and chuckled as she said she didn’t have to buy anything crazy. Notebooks, pens, pencils. The stuff my parents bought me when I was in school eons ago.

I know the thirst for supplies is all over the country, but again, I was left with this pit of familiar dread in my stomach that our school system is so, so, so unbalanced. Every school is not created equal, or treated equally. Take my sister’s complaint, for instance. I have never known a teacher in my district to ask for a specific brand of something, simply because I think we’re happy when a student comes in prepared at all. Teachers in her district feel comfortable asking for it because they know they can and will receive it. That speaks volumes about the differences in the districts. And I don’t mean it as an insult to anyone. I understand wanting quality items, and I know that teachers ask for them only because they know from experience that they last longer or work better. Hell, I would ask for it if I knew it wouldn’t be a burden on my students’ parents. We make do with what we have, because we have no other choice, yet districts near and far from mine are full of choices.

I feel like education today is feast or famine. 2 years ago, when I went to a conference in Boston, I met a bunch of people who were flown in from another state. Indiana, maybe? I don’t remember. But their school district funded the trip… flight, hotel, food, etc. It was probably 8-10 people. I wish I remembered the specifics. But all I can remember thinking is how angry it made me that a school in another state had funds for a cross-country professional development trip for multiple faculty members while districts all around my area were firing teachers left and right because of budget restraints. Yet I was positive that their trip alone could have saved a teacher’s job. 

When I relayed this all to a teacher friend today, she understood, but went on to say that her school is now 1-1 with technology. We have a computer lab and three laptop carts. Only one of the laptop carts works and I use the word “works” loosely. Yet, even counting the shitty cart, we are 10-1 on technology. Her school is only 30 miles away, but it might as well be in another universe.

American teachers often cite Finland as the ideal place for education. From everything I have read on the subject, Finland’s first few steps to improving education included treating all schools as equals. There are no Have Nots, there are only Haves. I’m not begrudging other schools for having things or being able to provide awesome trips for professional development, but I don’t think education will ever improve unless we see each school as deserving of the same resources as the next.

Am I insane to believe that class warfare in America has its roots in our school system?