teach the children

When your child says “Why can’t I get a puppy?”

Instead of defaulting to “My house, my rules”

Try “Any pet is a lot of responsibility. A puppy would have to be fed, walked, and taken outside to use the bathroom several times a day and taken for regular check-ups and vaccinations at the vet. You can’t do all of that by yourself, and I/we don’t have the time or money either.”

When your teenager says “Why can’t I come home at 2:00 this Saturday?”

Instead of defaulting to “My house, my rules!”

Try “The time you come home is a matter of respect and consideration. I/We will not only be concerned for your safety, but we would either be disturbed in the middle of the night when you arrive or forced to stay up for several extra hours waiting.”

When your child says “Why am I not allowed to do this thing?”

Instead of defaulting to “My house, my rules!”

Try actually communicating a legitimate reason, because children pick up on subtlety and on context and on the unspoken messages, and it’s better to teach children lessons like “You should think really hard before taking on new responsibilities” and “It’s important to show consideration for the needs of the people with whom you share a living space” than lessons like “It’s okay for people to demand your absolute obedience so long as you’re dependent on them for survival.”

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Watch: This video of Black parents talking to their kids about police brutality will break your heart

Though this shouldn’t have to be the case, teaching their children to deal with the police is often a lesson that Black parents have to instill in their children at an early age. A heartbreaking new video released on Monday shows just what those conversations can look like. 

Gifs: WatchCut Video

Let’s take a minute to talk about

Septima Poinsette Clark (May 3, 1898—December 15, 1987)

Originally posted by roricomics

Septima Poinsette Clark was a civil rights and education activist. Originally barred from teaching in Charleston, SC schools because she was Black, Clark petitioned for that right in 1920. She won. And she did it while teaching children during the day and adults at night in a nearby town. MLK Jr. refers to her as “The Mother of the Movement”. 


Mae C. Jemison (October 17, 1956)

Originally posted by francavillarts

Mae C. Jemison was not only the first Black woman in space, she was the first Black female astronaut for NASA ever. She launched in the Endeavor in 1992, just 25 years ago. 


Maria Weems (1840—?)

Originally posted by smithsonianlibraries

Above is Anna Maria Weems, a woman who escaped slavery by posing as a male. With a $500 reward for her capture, Weems spent over two months on the road until she found freedom in Canada. This art comes courtesy of the Smithsonian Libraries’ (@smithsonianlibraries) yearly celebration of BHM, which includes stories, art, personal histories, and lots more from their massive collection.

Follow these too:

  • Black Women Art (@fyblackwomenart​) has been around since 2012 (!), giving anyone who follows them a regular dose of art featuring Black women.
  • Badass Black Women History Month (@bbwhm​) is a brand new Tumblr celebrating badass Black women every day for Black History Month. Hell yeah.

There are more in the search results, of course. More Black women in STEM, in music, in sports, standing up for their rights, and have you read up on the Motorcycle Queen of Miami? One thing to note: some of these posts aren’t just highlighting women from 10, 20, 30, 100 years ago. They’re also highlighting Black women today, because Black women are still making history. 

How often my conversations about feminism have spiraled into requests for assault. I say, “Women don’t need men to defend them,” and am asked, “Can I punch you, then?” And I say, “Women belong in movies and video games and everything,” and I hear terrible things, unprintable slurs and demands for my assault, the threatening of a young woman to shut up: What they would do to silence me. The things they’d shove between my teeth. I say, “Men cannot threaten any woman they disagrees with,” and I’m told, “Women are just as cruel. Am I not supposed to respond in kind?” In my inbox today I have deleted sixteen messages asking for my life. When I say, “Your virginity only means what you want it to mean,” I’m asked, “If you believe in sexual freedom can I fuck you?” When I say “All it takes to be a woman is to want to be a woman,” I am asked, “So if I just say that I’m a woman, can I watch you in the shower?” As if women stand shadowy behind each other in our private moments. As if being woman means sexually assaulting each other.

Part of me - cynical, unwilling to be frightened, says that it might be a nice dose of reality. My shower where I am naked but my hair becomes streaky and thin, where my body sags, where my makeup smears. To witness a woman less than sexy, legs akimbo while shaving, pulling up flab thighs to reach the underside. Part of me dares them to punch me because I fight to win and am small but I’ll kill a man if he touches me. Once I dropped a U.S Marine. Part of me, hellfire and ice queen - says come on, then. You want a fight? Come fight me.

But more is scared. More timidly deletes messages, makes sure my name is hidden, doesn’t answer the endless antifeminist comments. The insertion of men and their opinion on simple things like “I teach children to ask before hugging.” When I close my eyes sometimes I wonder if they’re right and that scares me. How much am I going to change when my voice only echoes around me.

Why are you angry. Why are you angry. What do you think we are taking from you? If it’s not already equal why would equality frighten you.

The ancient art of being a woman and trying to get your voice heard: the gentle suggestion, the peaceful comment. The quiet listening to another opinion and the fact we must acknowledge it before we can continue. That I must educate, be sweet, be feminine in my feminism or else it’s “invalid.” I must present my declaration as a timid thing: “Women maybe should be part of more things.” And then the apologies: of course I don’t hate men, yes I like plenty of things with men in them, no I don’t think women are better. And then the explanations: women are people, here is the number of women in media, here is the number of dead women in media, here are the number of shows led by men. And then I brace for it. For the bullying.

Every time I speak it’s from a flinch. From “maybe this isn’t always the case but for me it is.” From please listen. From less demanding. God forbid I state factually that men are violent. If I speak about our fathers and brothers and the cycle of anger unfolding. God forbid I suggest that just once we should cut the bullshit and treat women well without pandering to men about how that helps them. What if I say “Men shouldn’t hit anyone. Hitting isn’t an answer.”

I’ll tell you what happens. The post was up for four seconds with three notes. The message I get is “If hitting isn’t allowed I’ll just go ahead and shove a gun down your throat.”

having gay characters in kids’ books is not political. teaching your kids that lgbt+ people do not exist, that being lgbt+ is shameful, or that lgbt+ stories do not deserve to be told, is political. if you are not teaching children tolerance, you are teaching them bigotry. full stop

someone: so what’s your biggest fear??

what I think: the potential for english and other major languages to wipe out thousands of existing languages as they have been for decades and never having the potential to learn or use specific languages as populations shift from using their native language to more mainstream means of communication and neglect to teach their children their native language rendering them monolingual likely english speakers and further pushing other languages to the sidelines.

what I say: oh haha! um spiders are pretty scary!

Can we as a society please like stop teaching young children that anything done in the name of love is okay and even noble? Just because someone does something out of love does not make it okay or excusable.

This line of thought is is so often portrayed in media, especially in YA literature and media, where straight guys are excused or even congratulated for their shitty behavior because they did it out of love (looking at you Stephanie Meyer). It is perpetuated in “he does it because he likes you” type comments made toward literal children. It is the foundation of harassment and entitlement toward women. It is everywhere.

This idea is DANGEROUS. This idea gets young people, especially young women, abused and killed. Love is not an excuse, it is not a way to sweep the dirt under the rug. Love is commitment and honesty and work. “But he did it because he loves her,” is a cop-out, plain and simple. It allows people, especially men, to hide behind their affections to avoid owning up to their shitty behavior.

Not everything done in the name of love is done in the spirit of love, and we need to start teaching young people to tell the difference.

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I was impressed, like “wow Yuzu’s gonna be a very good coach!!”, until I saw teaching kids how to do basics:

You should be fine with coach Yuzu, just stay away from coaching Learn-to-skate class and teaching triple-axel :)))) I don’t think others can understand how to skate ‘ton’, ‘su’,’shuu’, and ‘pa’ XD

Source: x,x,x

I think the big mistake in schools is trying to teach children anything, and by using fear as the basic motivation. Fear of getting failing grades, fear of not staying with your class, etc. Interest can produce learning on a scale compared to fear as a nuclear explosion to a firecracker.
—  Stanley Kubrick

Your children are not your children.
They are the sons and daughters
of Life’s longing for itself.
They come through you but not from you,
And though they are with you,
they belong not to you.

You may give them your love
but not your thoughts,
For they have their own thoughts.
You may house their bodies
but not their souls,
For their souls dwell in the house of tomorrow,
which you cannot visit, not even in your dreams.
You may strive to be like them,
but seek not to make them like you.
For life goes not backward
nor tarries with yesterday.

—  Kahlil Gibran, The Prophet

What did this episode teach you, children?

  1. Erwin fucking Smith is a crazy bastard.
  2. Erwin fucking Smith is daddy dominant level 100: hanging from a Titan’s mouth and still giving orders.
  3. Erwin fucking Smith is fucking crazy.
  4. Erwin fucking Smith lopped off his own fucking arm with his own fucking sword and managed to do the daring young man on the flying trapeze to Eren.
  5. God knows how long Erwin fucking Smith hung there like a piece of lettuce in the Titan’s teeth before deciding ‘welp, time to chop chop outta here’
  6. Erwin fucking Smith is a crazy bastard who needs to impregnate me or Levi as soon as possible.