taxidermied-animals

I’m Sophie Doberdor, and sometimes, I like to carve designs into bones and make them really special. I’ve been doing this a little over a year now and although I have slowed down recently due to work commitments, I still carve in my spare time and dream big of this being my career someday.

Animals are enormously important to me and I care deeply for their welfare. All my bones are sourced ethically and not a single animal will die for the purpose of my art.

I’m already on Instagram (www.instagram.com/sophiedoberdor), Twitter (www.twitter.com/doberdordesign) and most recently Facebook (www.facebook.com/doberdordesign) and I’m now going to try and figure out this platform so I can continue to share with you my progress in developing my skills as a bone carver!

Welcome to my bone carving adventure!

10

German artist Wolfram Kampffmeyer uses his love of computer animation and 3D modeling to to create beautiful 3D paper sculptures of polygonal animals.

“If you are sitting in front of the computer all day watching your virtual models, you start wishing to hold them in your hands.“

Kampffmeyer was so pleased by the results of his initial efforts to create a 3D paper pig that he has since been hard at work on an awesome onoing series of full-body sculptures and pieces that resemble taxidermy mounts, all ready-made to be assembled by you at home. They’re stylishly geometric while also being delightfully lifelike.

Head over to Kampffmeyer’s Paperwolf shop to view more of his DIY animals sculptures. There you’ll also find postcards, light fixtures, punch-out 2D animals, and even a few wooden polygonal animals sculptures too.

[via BoredPanda]

6

All That Remains: A Haunting Gallery of Extinct Animals in Paris

La Salle des Espèces Menacées et des Espèces Disparues, or the Room of Endangered and Extinct Species, has 257 specimens from the animal and plant kingdoms. Many are the only remaining examples of their species, such as the skeleton of a black emu (the taxidermy is so precious that it is kept in storage). Others represent a species that is on the brink of obliteration, including the Sumatran tiger. 

Read more here.

Extinct animals on display at the Natural History Museum in Stuttgart, Germany. Photo from Flickr: [x

The display features a model of a dodo skeleton and taxidermy specimens of the Great Auk, Carolina Parakeet, Przewalski’s horse, thylacine, and two Passenger Pigeons. Though it is displayed with extinct animals in this exhibit, the Przewalski’s horse is currently classified as endangered; it was once considered extinct in the wild.

10

Colorado-based artist Chris Haas combines his hobby of collecting animal skulls and his passion for art to create hauntingly beautiful mixed media pieces. Hass paints and embellishes his skulls with sculptural details, gives them spellbinding glass eyes, and sometimes adds antlers, horns, ears, or beaks to create entirely new hybrid creatures. These lavishly decorated skulls are then mounted on ornate plaques and frames, like dark otherworldly taxidermy.

To check out many more of his marvelously macabre creations visit Chris Haas’ website, Facebook page, or Instagram feed.

[via BeautifulDecay]

10

Bizarre Taxidermy by 10 Artists

The art of taxidermy has been practiced for a long time; the ancient Egyptians embalmed and entombed cats, birds, and other creatures. Over the millennia, animals have been mounted as hunters’ trophies and museum artifacts. It is an odd practice, one that is traditionally pulled between human pride, symbolism, and a desire to memorialize deceased representations of the wilderness.

10

Today the Department of Outstanding Origami explores the work of 鈬鍢鋃銘鎶, a skillful Chinese paper folding artist who shares their wonderful creations on the Chinese social network Baidu Tieba. We love the variety of the pieces they make, which range from fantastic creatures to cute, but realistic animals to taxidermy mounts to an impressively creepy grim reaper and even and Easter Island Moai head. Awesome!

鈬鍢鋃銘鎶has shared over 70 different pieces of origami to date.
Click here to view more.

[via Kotaku]

10

American sculptress Jessica Joslin (previously featured here) uses ethically sourced animal skulls and bones along with beautiful antique found objects, such as Victorian-era hardware and fittings, to create extraordinarily beautiful creatures that are part ornate metal work and part bone. The longer we look at them, the more we expect these otherworldly creatures to turn their heads and look right back at us.

“…Joslin gives the creatures whose bones she utilizes a dignified appearance even in death. Her work is both decorative and visceral, as her intricate craftsmanship belies her haunting subject matter.”

Joslin recently completed a new body of work for her solo show, The Immortal Zoo, which was on display at Firecat Projects, a non-profit gallery in Chicago.

Click here to watch a beautiful teaser video for the exhibition, which provides a marvelously close look at Joslin’s newest menagerie.

[via Hi-Fructose]

4

Meet the “beefalo” - a hybrid between a wild bison and a domestic cow. These animals are often bred not merely for novelty, but also because they are heartier in cold weather, don’t suffer from many diseases that normal stock are susceptible to, and because they produce leaner meat than their domestic counterparts. 

I actually started looking into these guys because I purchased a strange pelt on Craigslist last weekend that looked, from the listing photos, to be an abnormally-dark buffalo hide. But when I saw the skin in person, it was clear this was not the case. The hide had characteristics of both domestic cow and wild bison, and because I’d heard of beefalo before without having done much research on the breed, I decided to look into a bit more in-depth. 

Bingo. The skin looks like a blackish-brown bison skin with a ‘mane’ and everything, but the hair is a bit more coarse and wiry than you’d expect from a full-blooded bison. The seller initially thought the pelt was from an enormous black bear, to give you an idea as to what kind of fur this thing has. I’ll have to snap some photos of it tomorrow when I’ve got better light.

For now, enjoy the novelty of these amazing hybrids.