tasmanian tiger thylacine

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This is the Extinct Species Graveyard at the Bronx Zoo in New York. The only “gravestone” not included in this post is that of the Labrador Duck.

I was very pleased to find this little display at the zoo even though some of the dates are inaccurate.

The Extinct Thylacine or Tasmanian Tiger

The Thylacine was the largest known carnivorous marsupial of modern times.  It is commonly known as the Tasmanian tiger (because of its striped lower back) or the Tasmanian wolf.  Native to continental Australia, Tasmania and New Guinea, it is believed to have become extinct in the 20th century.  It was the last extant member of its family, Thylacinidae;  specimens of other members of the family have been found in the fossil record dating back to the late Oligocene.

The Thylacine had become extremely rare or extinct on the Australian mainland before British settlement of the continent, but it survived on the island of Tasmania along with several other endemic species, including the Tasmanian Devil.  Intensive hunting encouraged by bounties is generally blamed for its extinction, but other contributing factors may have been disease, the introduction of dogs, and human encroachment into its habitat.  Despite its official classification as extinct, sightings are still reported, though none has been conclusively proven.

About the video:  Compilation of all five known Australian silent films featuring the recently extinct thylacines, shot in Hobart Zoo, Tasmania, Australia. Benjamin, the last specimen, is shown in the footage starting from 2:05.  The clips are separated by fades.

Video Source (public domain);  reference

@simple-pianist @emptyheartsonfire

The Oxford Dictionary defines a cryptid as “An animal whose existence or survival is disputed or unsubstantiated”.

The last confirmed thylacine was the one, commonly known nowadays as Benjamin, who died at the Hobart Zoo in 1936. Though the species wasn’t officially declared extinct until the 1980s, it’s more than likely it was long gone far before then. However, since Benjamin’s death there have been thousands of supposed sightings of the thylacine, making its official status as “Extinct” hotly disputed.