tape record

Reasons why I keep loving Steven Universe: 

  • Has -at the moment- two non-binary characters with they/them pronouns (Stevonnie and Smoky Quartz)
  • Has a canon couple that they don’t “hint” or “hide” or keep as endgame and when they get screen time they are not afraid of showing them kissing, flirting, snuggling and doing gay stuff (Ruby and Sapphire).
  • Has A PAST canon couple (Pearl and Rose) and they show them loving each other and kissing.
  • Shows how hard is to let go many stuffs that are valuable to you and you love, like people or things you used to do. 
  • Has as a protagonist a jewish autistic boy (both confirmed) and his mother was a bi/pan polyamorous leader of a revolution. 
  • Has a pretty diverse cast in voice-acting and storyboarding.  
  • Has a character with many autistic traits (Peridot) without trowing a “needs to be healed” excuse, but rather showing ways that she adapts to situations (Her record tape was many times used as a way to express her feelings or explain herself better).
  • Has a pretty big amount of non-binary characters that use she/her pronouns. 
  • Has characters that fucks things up and are not perfect, but they keep growing and learning and being better.
  • Has amazing atmosphere (backgrounds, music, color choices, designs). 
  • GOOD CHARACTER DEVELOPMENT (gosh bless them because this is so hard to find)
  • Excluding Pearl that is more ambiguous (some people headcanon her as white and others as POC), none of the main characters are white (Amethyst is Black/Latinx -or both- and Garnet is black).
  • The plot is actually pretty interesting.
  • “Filler” episodes have constant little hints on what could happen in the future/things that would be part of a much important plot-point in the future (The gem shards on “Secret team”, Ronaldo’s constantly hitting the spot, character development). 
  • The villains are not based on just being intimidating but they are shown having weak spots and?? personalities? which is harder to find that I though it would be?
  • It has a nice charm while talking on style? 
  • Many of the secondary and background characters are POC.
  • Those moms in the back that are always fun to search in every beach-city centered episode? I love them.
  • The voice acting job is AMAZING and it really feels like the workers are enjoying their job, (special shoutout to Charlyne Yi that has voiced a total of 8 Rubies and somehow found the way to give them all their own charm).
  • Wasn’t afraid to talk about unhealthy and abusive relationships and show how bad they are. 

Thank-you to everyone who joined me in my stream~! (All 3 of you!!)
This is for the @lapidot-love’s cover page. I hope it suits them for a long time~!

The objects in the background represent all the things they’ve been through together.

New interview in Sunday’s The Observer. Highlights:

On doing press: “Having just turned 40 I hope I’ve achieved some sort of wisdom or patience,” he says in his soft, evenly paced brogue. As a younger man he disliked watching himself on screen; he struggled with press duties and avoided TV chat shows until a few years ago. “I was very uncomfortable with this,” he continues with a gesture at my tape recorder and notepad. “The reductive nature nowadays of most journalism is very frustrating.” One newspaper report on the most recent series of Peaky Blinders focused on the baring of his bottom. “It is getting absurd with the dumbing down, the level of questions you get asked.”

On moving to Dublin and getting a puppy: Murphy moved away, making his home in London with his wife and children Malachy and Aran, now 11 and nine. After 14 years in the British capital, however, they have just relocated to Dublin… “You want to be with your parents as they get older and you want your children to be aware of their culture… Irish people are brilliant and you have to go away and come back to realise it.” Did his boys rebel when they were told they’d be leaving their schoolfriends behind? “We promised them a dog so that was just fine.” A black Labrador arrived, though, he says, “I am the only one that walks it, of course.” 

On Dunkirk: Though Nolan’s films are usually shrouded in secrecy, as Murphy points out: “Everybody knows what happened at Dunkirk, so it can’t deviate too much from the facts. It is not like Inception or Interstellar, there’s no major reveal.” He describes Nolan as an old-fashioned filmmaker. “And while all of his films have big budgets and involve a lot of setet pieces, they always feel like a little independent film for the actor because you only ever have one camera and Chris watches on a tiny little monitor. He is right there beside you.”

On Peaky Blinders: The show will run for two more seasons. “It is some of the best writing I have come across,” he says, “and I never expected to revisit a character like that over and over. It will be about 30 hours of television when we have finished and to shine a light into all these weird parts of the character’s psyche that you would never ever get in the compressed version of a feature film or even a play, that is an extraordinary gift. I am very lucky that it came along. I have always just been about the work.”

On his interests outside acting: “I have not been interested in anything else,” he says. “I know I am old-fashioned, but I don’t want to bring out a fashion line, I don’t want to bring out an album. I just want to do the work as best as I can and if that effects change for somebody, then that is great.” He smiles. “I don’t want to change the world.”

Took the week off after tour to catch up on sleep and get back to normal life. While on the road I realized just how much my 4 track was on its last leg and now I’m back in the studio testing out a new one. It doesn’t quite sound the same and I’m wondering if part of my sound came from using such a busted ass 4 track… 🤔

It occurs to me that at some point after meeting Greg, or becoming friends with Vidalia, Amethyst probably got her hands on something that played records or tapes or CD’s (or even just regular radio) and started playing music REALLY FUCKING LOUD. All kinds of human music, whatever she could get her hands on (which was probably mostly from Greg and Vidalia), finding out what she liked. 

I’m just imagining Pearl’s face when she’s in her room, like, dancing on one of those fountains or something, and from Amethyst’s room starts booming, “I LIKE BIG BUTTS AND I CANNOT LIE”

10

8-TRACK TAPES

Part One

Ridiculed today as the essence of obsolescence, the clunky, primitive 8-track tape brought about a social change of the same magnitude as the epochal Supreme Court decisions and the counterculture movement of the 1960s.

The 8-track tape, introduced in 1965, consisted of an endless loop of standard ¼-inch magnetic tape, housed in a plastic cartridge. On the tape were eight parallel soundtracks, corresponding to four stereo programs. Although it was developed by Learjet for aviation playback, the technology became an instant success when auto makers began installing tape decks in cars. Prior to the 8-track tape, music playback at home was limited to vinyl records, expensive reel-to-reel decks and the radio,and, in the car, to AM radio only. The easy-to-use, self-activating decks and small, lightweight cartridges for the first time allowed the driver, and not the radio station, to choose the music, thus insuring the format’s success. The popularity of the system encouraged the rapid development of 8-track tape components for home stereos, capable of recording and playback, making it possible for listeners to access their music on a single, portable format, at home and in the car. With its ease of use and flexibility, the 8-track tape quickly overtook the sale of large, heavy, fragile,vinyl records, to become the largest segment of the retail music market in the early 1970s.

To be sure, 8-track tapes had their drawbacks. While the self-playing, endless-loop required no attention while driving, it could not be fast-forwarded, rewound or cued, only played through. To hear a certain song, one had to listen the entire track. Fitting the 10-12 songs of an album into the tape’s four 10-minutes segments meant that the track order of vinyl recordings was not respected (a huge problem for albums without breaks between tracks like Dark Side of the Moon or clear narratives like Tommy). The most egregious offense was the sometimes-unavoidable splitting of longer songs between two tracks, which entailed a fade-out mid-song, a long silence followed by the tape head (loudly) shifting to the next track and then a fade-in to the rest of the song. Serious audiophiles and fans stuck with vinyl.

Inferior in sound quality but capable of rewinding and allowing for a kind of random access, cassette tapes replaced 8-tracks in the early 1980s. While the tapes are now emblems of the past-ness of the 1970s, the 8-track inaugurated the era of portability, multi-platform capability, and, most importantly, personal choice in music–the basic functionalities we expect all devices to provide. Modern consciousness radically differs from that of even 50 years ago because we now have life-long, always available, highly-personalized soundtracks running constantly and shaping our days. We may have different equipment but we still inhabit the 8-track conceptual framework.