taolu*

Annual church fundraiser at the free church of tonga || masters of crowd sourcing, each family puts forward a child to dance then fakapali - a shower of cash - || this lil girl was so focused even after the traditional music gave way “gangam style” her subtle gestures of ta'olunga continued || the event raised 4600 pa'anga towards building a new church next year || #kingdomoftonga #tonga #tongan #money #taolunga #dancer #polynesia #pacific #paradise #cash #crowdsourcing #ofakitonga @proudtongans @mustbetongans @kingdomoftonga @tongaholiday #culture #love #beauty #cute (at Kanokupolu, Tongatapu, Tonga)

vimeo

WUSHU 武术 from Wushu Shaolin on Vimeo.

Wushu (simplified Chinese: 武术; traditional Chinese: 武術) is both an exhibition and a full-contact sport derived from traditional Chinese martial arts. It was developed in China after 1949, in an effort to standardize the practice of traditional Chinese martial arts, although attempts to structure the various decentralized martial arts traditions date back earlier, when the Central Guoshu Institute was established at Nanking in 1928. The term wushu is Chinese for “martial arts” (武 “Wu” = military or martial, 术 “Shu” = art). In contemporary times, wushu has become an international sport through the International Wushu Federation (IWUF), which holds the World Wushu Championships every two years; the first World Championships were held in 1991 in Beijing and won by Yuan Wen Qing.

Competitive wushu is composed of two disciplines: taolu (套路; forms) and sanda (散打; sparring).

Taolu involves martial art patterns and maneuvers for which competitors are judged and given points according to specific rules. The forms comprise basic movements (stances, kicks, punches, balances, jumps, sweeps and throws) based on aggregate categories of traditional Chinese martial art styles and can be changed for competitions to highlight one’s strengths. Competitive forms have time limits that can range from 1 minute, 20 seconds for some external styles to over five minutes for internal styles. Modern wushu competitors are increasingly training in aerial techniques such as 540-, 720-, and even 900-degree jumps and kicks to add more difficulty and style to their forms.

Sanda (sometimes called sanshou or Lei tai) is a modern fighting method and sport influenced by traditional Chinese boxing, Chinese wrestling methods called Shuai jiao and other Chinese grappling techniques such as Chin Na. It has all the combat aspects of wushu. Sanda appears much like Kickboxing or Muay Thai, but includes many more grappling techniques. Sanda fighting competitions are often held alongside taolu or form competitions.

youtube

Cang Hua, “la fleur cachée” : Taolu de Liu He Tang Lang Quan.
Executé par Jérôme Ravenet, élève de Maître Liu Jing Ru (www.liujingru.com)

(via https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N8NfL9Zfm6M)

10

happy birthday to the most precious child on the planet♥ i will love and support you no matter what path you decide on in life. hope this birthday and everyday will be blessed. 生日快乐,黄子韬♥
weibo||devart

3

this is how i felt when i saw the ridiculous comeback concept photos tbh,,,,

(luhan and tao are probably relieved right now to not have to be in those outfits…)

vimeo

Wushu Inspiration 2015 from Wushu Shaolin on Vimeo.

Wushu (simplified Chinese: 武术; traditional Chinese: 武術) is both an exhibition and a full-contact sport derived from traditional Chinese martial arts. It was developed in China after 1949, in an effort to standardize the practice of traditional Chinese martial arts, although attempts to structure the various decentralized martial arts traditions date back earlier, when the Central Guoshu Institute was established at Nanking in 1928. The term wushu is Chinese for “martial arts” (武 “Wu” = military or martial, 术 “Shu” = art). In contemporary times, wushu has become an international sport through the International Wushu Federation (IWUF), which holds the World Wushu Championships every two years; the first World Championships were held in 1991 in Beijing and won by Yuan Wen Qing.

Competitive wushu is composed of two disciplines: taolu (套路; forms) and sanda (散打; sparring).

Taolu involves martial art patterns and maneuvers for which competitors are judged and given points according to specific rules. Sanda (sometimes called sanshou or Lei tai) is a modern fighting method and sport influenced by traditional Chinese boxing, Chinese wrestling methods called Shuai jiao and other Chinese grappling techniques such as Chin Na. It has all the combat aspects of wushu. Sanda fighting competitions are often held alongside taolu or form competitions.

In 1958, the government established the All-China Wushu Association as an umbrella organization to regulate martial arts training. The Chinese State Commission for Physical Culture and Sports took the lead in creating standardized forms for most of the major arts. During this period, a national Wushu system that included standard forms, teaching curriculum, and instructor grading was established. Wushu was introduced at both the high school and university level. Stylistic concepts such as hard, soft, internal, external, as well as classifications based on schools such as Shaolin, Taiji, Wudang and others were all integrated into one system.

vimeo

International Wushu Federation from Wushu Shaolin on Vimeo.

Wushu (simplified Chinese: 武术; traditional Chinese: 武術) is both an exhibition and a full-contact sport derived from traditional Chinese martial arts. It was developed in China after 1949, in an effort to standardize the practice of traditional Chinese martial arts, although attempts to structure the various decentralized martial arts traditions date back earlier, when the Central Guoshu Institute was established at Nanking in 1928. The term wushu is Chinese for “martial arts” (武 “Wu” = military or martial, 术 “Shu” = art). In contemporary times, wushu has become an international sport through the International Wushu Federation (IWUF), which holds the World Wushu Championships every two years; the first World Championships were held in 1991 in Beijing and won by Yuan Wen Qing.

Competitive wushu is composed of two disciplines: taolu (套路; forms) and sanda (散打; sparring).

Taolu involves martial art patterns and maneuvers for which competitors are judged and given points according to specific rules. Sanda (sometimes called sanshou or Lei tai) is a modern fighting method and sport influenced by traditional Chinese boxing, Chinese wrestling methods called Shuai jiao and other Chinese grappling techniques such as Chin Na. It has all the combat aspects of wushu. Sanda fighting competitions are often held alongside taolu or form competitions.

In 1958, the government established the All-China Wushu Association as an umbrella organization to regulate martial arts training. The Chinese State Commission for Physical Culture and Sports took the lead in creating standardized forms for most of the major arts. During this period, a national Wushu system that included standard forms, teaching curriculum, and instructor grading was established. Wushu was introduced at both the high school and university level. Stylistic concepts such as hard, soft, internal, external, as well as classifications based on schools such as Shaolin, Taiji, Wudang and others were all integrated into one system.