taoist masters

6

Collecting Tree Energy.

Taoist Masters observed that trees are tremendously powerful plants. Not only can they absorb carbon dioxide and transform it into oxygen, but they can also absorb negative forces and transform them into good Energy. Trees strongly root with the Earth, and the more rooted the tree, the higher it can extend to Heaven. Trees stand very still, absorbing the Earth’s Energy and the Universal Force from the Heavens. Trees and all plants have the ability to absorb the Light of the Energies and transform it into food; in fact, they depend on light for most of their nourishment, while water and earth minerals make up about 30% of their nutritional intake. Trees are able to live very long lives.

The Tree as Healer and Friend
Trees are the largest and most Spiritually advanced plants on Earth. They are constantly in Meditation, and Subtle Energy is their Natural Language. As your understanding of this language grows, you can begin to develop a relationship with them. They can help you open your Energy Channels and cultivate calm, presence, and vitality. You can reciprocate by helping them with their own blockages and devitalized areas. It is a mutually beneficial relationship that needs cultivation.

Choosing a Tree to Work With
Throughout history human beings have used all parts of the tree for Healing and Medicine. The best trees for Healing are big trees, especially pines. Pine trees radiate Chi, nourish blood, strengthen nervous systems, and contribute to long lives. They also nurture Souls and Spirits. Pines are the “Immortal Tree.” Early Chinese poetry and painting is full of admiration for pines. Although pine trees are often the best choice, many other trees or plants can be used. The larger trees contain the most Energy. Among the most powerful are trees growing near running water. Some trees feel warmer or hotter than others; some feel cooler or colder than others. Practice distinguishing the varying properties of different trees. You do not need to go far out into the forest to find an appropriate tree to work with. Trees that are used to having people around understand our Energy and are actually more accessible and friendly than those far out in the wilderness. There is a certain size range within which trees are most accessible to human beings. When a tree is too small, it does not have enough Energy to make much of an impression on you. When the tree is too big, you have the opposite problem, so it takes more persistence to get large trees to take an interest in you. As a source of Healing Energy, it is best to choose a large, robust tree from within the accessible size range.

Establishing Communion with a Tree
There are certain methods to approaching, interacting with, retreating from and taking leave of a tree. By following specific steps you create a Ritual of Silent Communion that both you and the tree can understand, and so increase the potential for Harmonious Interaction. The steps were derived from observation of the Natural course of events in Subtle Energy Communion, and apply to communion with just about anything: tree, rock, human, or animal, although the following is concerned specifically with trees. First of all, each tree, like each person, has a personality, desires, and a Life of its own. Trees differ widely in their taste for human contact. Some are very generous and want to give you all the Energy you can take. Others are weak or ill and need your comforting and Healing Energy. Some are just friendly Souls who enjoy human company. You can learn and grow by working with all of them. Trees operate on a longer time scale than do human beings. You can help to bridge this gap by returning again and again to the same tree, so that a relationship develops. Visit regularly so that the tree knows when to expect you and can look forward to seeing you. Spiritual communion with trees resembles love more than any other human activity. Let the tree lead you into the wonders of its own inner life. 

Flow

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by Saṃsāran

“Those who flow as life flows know they need no other force.”

– Lao Tzu, 2500 BCE, Taoist Master

When people write to me telling me that they are afraid, worried or under pressure I often say “flow always flow”. However, it dawns on me that I have never really explained what I mean by this. We need to understand one primary truth and that is that outside circumstances do not make our reality. Rather it is our thoughts about our outside circumstances which make up our reality. 

The Taoist masters teach us that there are “lines of force” which like currents in a stream flow all around us. If all this “force” talk sounds familiar I note that George Lucas borrowed it from Lao Tzu.Sometimes we go against them and feel the current holding us back and even pushing us under. Other times we flow with the current and we feel the current push us along effortlessly. We must learn to find these lines of force. We do so by paying attention to our feelings and thoughts. When we are going against the flow we will feel obstructed. We will feel disharmony with our surroundings.

So we pay attention to our thinking and alter it to fit the flow. So we pay attention to our thinking and alter it to fit the flow. If we think “things have never been worse” then this is true. If we think “this is impossible” then it is. It is true to us. There is no objective reality at least not one perceptible to human beings. All reality is subjective for us. ;

So, what does this mean? It means that we can learn, with practice, not to engage our external circumstances in a negative way. We can observe but do so in a detached way. You see all things pass. Our difficult circumstances pass. Most of our fears are of imagined frightening futures which rarely ever come to pass and even when they do we find that just as we have dealt with our past troubles we can deal with those which do arise. The key to learning to do this is in the dual techniques of one pointed concentration and self observation.

So, we flow. We detach. We let things flow around us like we are a stone in a river. We stand detached. We remain calm. We train ourselves not to engage. Then when the worst happens we can deal with it with determined calm. Our minds are clear. Fear does not turn our bowels to water and our knees to brittle twigs. We stand like the stone. We deal with the problem and then, having done so, we let it go again.

We must let it go. It’s like swimming against the current. It exhausts you. After a while, whoever you are, you just have to let go, and the river brings you home.

– Buddhist Proverb     

What Does it mean to Flow?

`

By Samsaran

When people write to me telling me that they are afraid, worried or under pressure I often say “flow always flow”. However, it dawns on me that I have never really explained what I mean by this. We need to understand one primary truth and that is that outside circumstances do not make our reality. Rather it is our thoughts about our outside circumstances which make up our reality. 

The Taoist masters teach us that there are “lines of force” which like currents in a stream flow all around us. If all this “force” talk sounds familiar I note that George Lucas borrowed it from Lao Tzu. Sometimes we go against them and feel the current holding us back and even pushing us under. Other times we flow with the current and we feel the current push us along effortlessly. We must learn to find these lines of force. We do so by paying attention to our feelings and thoughts. When we are going against the flow we will feel obstructed. We will feel disharmony with our surroundings.

So we pay attention to our thinking and alter it to fit the flow. So we pay attention to our thinking and alter it to fit the flow. If we think “things have never been worse” then this is true. If we think “this is impossible” then it is. It is true to us. There is no objective reality at least not one perceptible to human beings. All reality is subjective for us. 

So, what does this mean? It means that we can learn, with practice, not to engage our external circumstances in a negative way. We can observe but do so in a detached way. You see all things pass. Our difficult circumstances pass. Most of our fears are of imagined frightening futures which rarely ever come to pass and even when they do we find that just as we have dealt with our past troubles we can deal with those which do arise. The key to learning to do this is in the dual techniques of one pointed concentration and self observation.

So, we flow. We detach. We let things flow around us like we are a stone in a river. We stand detached. We remain calm. We train ourselves not to engage. Then when the worst happens we can deal with it with determined calm. Our minds are clear. Fear does not turn our bowels to water and our knees to brittle twigs. We stand like the stone. We deal with the problem and then, having done so, we let it go again.

Flow, always flow.

Be careful what you water your dreams with. Water them with worry and fear and you will produce weeds that choke the life from your dream. Water them with optimism and solutions and you will cultivate success. Always be on the lookout for ways to turn a problem into an opportunity for success. Always be on the lookout for ways to nurture your dream.
—  atrib. Laozi, (Fifth Century BCE) Chinese Taoist Master
What Does it mean to Flow?

`

When people write to me telling me that they are afraid, worried or under pressure I often say “flow always flow”. However, it dawns on me that I have never really explained what I mean by this. We need to understand one primary truth and that is that outside circumstances do not make our reality. Rather it is our thoughts about our outside circumstances which make up our reality. 

The Taoist masters teach us that there are “lines of force” which like currents in a stream flow all around us. If all this “force” talk sounds familiar I note that George Lucas borrowed it from Lao Tzu. Sometimes we go against them and feel the current holding us back and even pushing us under. Other times we flow with the current and we feel the current push us along effortlessly. We must learn to find these lines of force. We do so by paying attention to our feelings and thoughts. When we are going against the flow we will feel obstructed. We will feel disharmony with our surroundings.

So we pay attention to our thinking and alter it to fit the flow. If we think “things have never been worse” then this is true. If we think “this is impossible” then it is. It is true to us. There is no objective reality at least not one perceptible to human beings. All reality is subjective for us. 

So, what does this mean? It means that we can learn, with practice, not to engage our external circumstances in a negative way. We can observe but do so in a detached way. You see all things pass. Our difficult circumstances pass. Most of our fears are of imagined frightening futures which rarely ever come to pass and even when they do we find that just as we have dealt with our past troubles we can deal with those which do arise. The key to learning to do this is in the dual techniques of one pointed concentration and self observation.

So, we flow. We detach. We let things flow around us like we are a stone in a river. We stand detached. We remain calm. We train ourselves not to engage. Then when the worst happens we can deal with it with determined calm. Our minds are clear. Fear does not turn our bowels to water and our knees to brittle twigs. We stand like the stone. We deal with the problem and then, having done so, we let it go again.

Requested by beherenowandzen. Here ya go Mark,

By: ๑ Samsaran ๑