taoist master

What Does it mean to Flow?

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By Samsaran

When people write to me telling me that they are afraid, worried or under pressure I often say “flow always flow”. However, it dawns on me that I have never really explained what I mean by this. We need to understand one primary truth and that is that outside circumstances do not make our reality. Rather it is our thoughts about our outside circumstances which make up our reality. 

The Taoist masters teach us that there are “lines of force” which like currents in a stream flow all around us. If all this “force” talk sounds familiar I note that George Lucas borrowed it from Lao Tzu. Sometimes we go against them and feel the current holding us back and even pushing us under. Other times we flow with the current and we feel the current push us along effortlessly. We must learn to find these lines of force. We do so by paying attention to our feelings and thoughts. When we are going against the flow we will feel obstructed. We will feel disharmony with our surroundings.

So we pay attention to our thinking and alter it to fit the flow. So we pay attention to our thinking and alter it to fit the flow. If we think “things have never been worse” then this is true. If we think “this is impossible” then it is. It is true to us. There is no objective reality at least not one perceptible to human beings. All reality is subjective for us. 

So, what does this mean? It means that we can learn, with practice, not to engage our external circumstances in a negative way. We can observe but do so in a detached way. You see all things pass. Our difficult circumstances pass. Most of our fears are of imagined frightening futures which rarely ever come to pass and even when they do we find that just as we have dealt with our past troubles we can deal with those which do arise. The key to learning to do this is in the dual techniques of one pointed concentration and self observation.

So, we flow. We detach. We let things flow around us like we are a stone in a river. We stand detached. We remain calm. We train ourselves not to engage. Then when the worst happens we can deal with it with determined calm. Our minds are clear. Fear does not turn our bowels to water and our knees to brittle twigs. We stand like the stone. We deal with the problem and then, having done so, we let it go again.

Flow, always flow.

You Will Never Unsee This

I noticed something in an old post containing Chinese characters, and then everything hit me like an industrial compactor.  Below I have confirmation of characters who have not yet had elements revealed.  The simplicity of everything will liquefy your brain, so be warned.

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Because one believes in oneself, one doesn’t try to convince others. Because one is content with oneself, one doesn’t need others’ approval. Because one accepts oneself, the whole world accepts him or her.
—  Laozi, (Fifth Century BCE) Chinese Taoist Master
Flow

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by Saṃsāran

“Those who flow as life flows know they need no other force.”

– Lao Tzu, 2500 BCE, Taoist Master

When people write to me telling me that they are afraid, worried or under pressure I often say “flow always flow”. However, it dawns on me that I have never really explained what I mean by this. We need to understand one primary truth and that is that outside circumstances do not make our reality. Rather it is our thoughts about our outside circumstances which make up our reality. 

The Taoist masters teach us that there are “lines of force” which like currents in a stream flow all around us. If all this “force” talk sounds familiar I note that George Lucas borrowed it from Lao Tzu.Sometimes we go against them and feel the current holding us back and even pushing us under. Other times we flow with the current and we feel the current push us along effortlessly. We must learn to find these lines of force. We do so by paying attention to our feelings and thoughts. When we are going against the flow we will feel obstructed. We will feel disharmony with our surroundings.

So we pay attention to our thinking and alter it to fit the flow. So we pay attention to our thinking and alter it to fit the flow. If we think “things have never been worse” then this is true. If we think “this is impossible” then it is. It is true to us. There is no objective reality at least not one perceptible to human beings. All reality is subjective for us. ;

So, what does this mean? It means that we can learn, with practice, not to engage our external circumstances in a negative way. We can observe but do so in a detached way. You see all things pass. Our difficult circumstances pass. Most of our fears are of imagined frightening futures which rarely ever come to pass and even when they do we find that just as we have dealt with our past troubles we can deal with those which do arise. The key to learning to do this is in the dual techniques of one pointed concentration and self observation.

So, we flow. We detach. We let things flow around us like we are a stone in a river. We stand detached. We remain calm. We train ourselves not to engage. Then when the worst happens we can deal with it with determined calm. Our minds are clear. Fear does not turn our bowels to water and our knees to brittle twigs. We stand like the stone. We deal with the problem and then, having done so, we let it go again.

We must let it go. It’s like swimming against the current. It exhausts you. After a while, whoever you are, you just have to let go, and the river brings you home.

– Buddhist Proverb     

Fill your bowl to the brim- and it will spill.
Keep sharpening your knife
and it will blunt.
Chase after money and security
and your heart will never unclench.
Care about people’s approval
and you will be their prisoner.
Do your work, then step back.
The only path to serenity.
—  Laozi, (Fifth Century BCE) Chinese Taoist Master

anonymous asked:

How do u go with the flow?

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by Saṃsāran

“Those who flow as life flows know they need no other force.”

– Lao Tzu, 2500 BCE, Taoist Master

When people write to me telling me that they are afraid, worried or under pressure I often say “flow always flow”. However, it dawns on me that I have never really explained what I mean by this. We need to understand one primary truth and that is that outside circumstances do not make our reality. Rather it is our thoughts about our outside circumstances which make up our reality. 

The Taoist masters teach us that there are “lines of force” which like currents in a stream flow all around us. If all this “force” talk sounds familiar I note that George Lucas borrowed it from Lao Tzu.Sometimes we go against them and feel the current holding us back and even pushing us under. Other times we flow with the current and we feel the current push us along effortlessly. We must learn to find these lines of force. We do so by paying attention to our feelings and thoughts. When we are going against the flow we will feel obstructed. We will feel disharmony with our surroundings.

So we pay attention to our thinking and alter it to fit the flow. So we pay attention to our thinking and alter it to fit the flow. If we think “things have never been worse” then this is true. If we think “this is impossible” then it is. It is true to us. There is no objective reality at least not one perceptible to human beings. All reality is subjective for us. ;

So, what does this mean? It means that we can learn, with practice, not to engage our external circumstances in a negative way. We can observe but do so in a detached way. You see all things pass. Our difficult circumstances pass. Most of our fears are of imagined frightening futures which rarely ever come to pass and even when they do we find that just as we have dealt with our past troubles we can deal with those which do arise. The key to learning to do this is in the dual techniques of one pointed concentration and self observation.

So, we flow. We detach. We let things flow around us like we are a stone in a river. We stand detached. We remain calm. We train ourselves not to engage. Then when the worst happens we can deal with it with determined calm. Our minds are clear. Fear does not turn our bowels to water and our knees to brittle twigs. We stand like the stone. We deal with the problem and then, having done so, we let it go again.

We must let it go. It’s like swimming against the current. It exhausts you. After a while, whoever you are, you just have to let go, and the river brings you home.

– Buddhist Proverb     

The Knowing and the Doing

by  Saṃsāran

When we first undertake to live the spiritual life we are seekers after knowledge.  We soak up the sacred books, the sayings of the wise and the words of our teacher. After awhile, we sense something is missing. We are bursting with knowledge but our lives have not changed. 

Then one morning, after having read the words many times, we wake up and something is different. We realize that all the knowledge of all the wise men through the ages means nothing without doing.  On that morning of the soul, we become doers instead of listeners. Then the doors of wisdom open to us and our life changes forever. This is the “awakening”.

If this sounds like something that Yoda would say to Luke Skywalker it is no coincidence. Yoda was modeled on a Taoist Master. The “force” is the eternal Tao. When Luke was struggling to “understand” his master’s words and failing Yoda snaps:  ”Do or do not.  There is no try”. This is the way of the Tao. Action. Not thought. The Tao can only be experienced not “understood”.

“Knowing is not enough; we must apply. It is good to be willing to try but being willing is not enough; we must do.”

Leonardo da Vinci, (1542 - 1519) Italian Renaissance Polymath

The Master views the parts with compassion, because he understands the whole. His constant practice is humility. He doesn’t glitter like a jewel- but lets himself be shaped by the Tao, as rugged and common as a stone.
—  Laozi, (Fifth Century BCE) Chinese Taoist Master