tangent atom

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► Accidental Tangent of A Trinity

Adam Thompson, the Atom (III)

         → “It’s time for the lies to end!”

Lia Nelson, the Flash (I)

→  “But if I ever see you again, I’ll make sure that I’m the only thing you see for the rest of your life!”

The Green Lantern

          → “To be honest there are times I’d rather spend my evenings at a nightclub or the movies, but hey, you are what you are. The fool it is who tries to fight his…or her destiny.”

Why Captain Canary Should Be Accepted By Fans (among other topics)

Everyone in the Legends of Tomorrow fandom probably knows about the ship known as ‘Captain Canary’, the pairing between Sara Lance and Leonard Snart. It’s been popular since the beginning, fans assembling in line before the show even started, gaining more and more after each episode. Why? Because they love the possibility of the two getting together, or just simply their interactions.

But, now, for whatever reason, even before the promo for episode 15 (entitled Destiny) was released, people who do not support the ship began to focus their hate on it. Now, don’t get me wrong, I am not a fan of hate in general. I don’t support some ships, but do I publicly announce hate for every ship that I don’t like? No. If I want to display my dislike for it with valid reasons as to why I don’t support it, I’ll correctly label all of my mentions of the ship and give my post the right tags. I don’t want people to take offense! I know what it’s like to live and breathe a ship.

On the topic of valid reasoning. This is something that a lot of Captain Canary antis have trouble gaining. A good number of them use their main protest as the ship lacking ‘bi and pan representation’. Does having bi representation mean Sara only having relations with a female character? In my personal opinion, bi representation means showing relations with both a male and a female. As for the subject of pan representation. Not to be a downer or anything, but have the writers specifically revealed Snart as pan? Sure, Wentworth Miller has said that he pitched him and plays him as pan, but ultimately it’s up to the writers to decide to look down that path. Now, yes, a lot of us want it. I would be interested in seeing that, I won’t deny it. But you can’t complain about having no ‘pan representation’ when it hasn’t been confirmed that Snart is, in fact, pan.

As for hating on Captain Canary in other ways, a lot of people protest against it mainly because they ship Nyssara, Coldwave, Coldflash, Canarrow, you name it. I hope a good number of you realize that most shippers of Captain Canary support more than one ship involving Sara and Snart? I understand that you like your ship more than this one, but why do you feel the need to hate on it? How would you feel if we did the same to your OTP? From what I’ve seen, a lot of Captain Canary shippers are respectful to other ships, even if CC is their only ship involving Sara and Snart.

Why should Captain Canary be accepted by everyone? Or, at the very least, tolerated? Well, for one, we’ve seen our share of bad romance on this show, as most of you would agree. Atomic Hawk is going down the drain, and I’m glad it’s (although probably temporarily) come to an end. Watching those two every week was like a dose of penicillin for me, personally. We know Ray from Arrow as the science geek who served as a barrier for Oliver and Felicity’s eventual love. And now, once Legends starts, he’s immediately given a new love interest? I don’t know about some fans, but I only know Ray for his love stories. And don’t even get me started on Kendra. She was introduced on The Flash as Cisco’s love interest. And then we find out she’s meant to be with Carter? And then Carter dies and she immediately gets together with Ray? It’s exhausting, to say the least. Kendra’s character is known only through her love as well…I want time to meet the real Kendra.

Back to the topic of Captain Canary. We all know Snart and Sara as individual characters very well, they’ve already developed their own unique personalities, and the fact that play off each other in a humorous way makes it even better. But they can also play off each other emotionally, as we saw in episode 7. Both have things in common, and that’s what caused them to connect. I, personally, enjoyed their relationship as a friendship, with maybe the lingering possibility of romance. I thought it was going to be the long, torturous slow burn that would eventually be worth it in the end. And then the promo for episode 15 was released, and as excited as I was, I couldn’t help but be disappointed after the reality of it sunk in.

The question is…why now? See, a lot of us shippers are dissatisfied with how quickly their romance came to fruition. We wanted to see their relationship grow more and more. In my eyes, it was all friendship. But the writers (obviously Guggenheim in the lead) decided to take the leap of faith, and I’m hoping they execute it properly. Yes, I’ve heard rumors about Snart sacrificing himself to become a hero, and I hope it isn’t true. But think about it…he’s undoubtedly popular among fans. It would be a terrible move to make. Unless they decide to pull a Mick Rory on us, making us think they’re dead until they come back miraculously. Maybe it’ll be one of those scenarios where there’s a slim chance of coming out alive, Snart takes it, Sara gives him what she thinks is a goodbye kiss, but he makes it? That would cause some tension and confusion between the two as to what they are to each other, but maybe after that, they’d keep it a friendship and allow their relationship to grow more and more.

But, finally, to close off my point. It needs to be accepted, not hated. We’re possibly being given this romance, and you’re going to have to learn to tolerate it if you continue to watch the show. Don’t quit a show because you hate a relationship, don’t publicly hate on the ship and continue to watch the show. It’s disrespectful for the fans, because even if you tag it and label the name of the ship properly (which I hope you do nonetheless), it may possibly be encountered by the fans unintentionally.

The Legends of Tomorrow fandom still has so much potential to be a fandom with no quarrels or hating, but I suppose it’s inevitable. Accept all ships, especially ones that are happening on the show. There’s nothing you can do to change that.

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Ion #10, page 7. Art by Greg Tocchini + Jay Leisten

You know, Ron Marz was part of the writers who participated in Tangent Comics.

Anytime he had someone talking about Lia, it was always in a negative light. I figured that was because of the “don’t judge by appearances” motif and whatnot. (It had been established she was much smarter than she looked.)

But something tells me he just really dislikes her as a character. So when the time came, he had some characters remark on her negatively and put “her” in this situation because he could.

Maybe I’m just taking it all too personally, which is possible. Any of my followers can attest to the fact I doth protect my baby too much.

In any case HANDS OFF THE BOOBS KID.

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The Atom #1, pgs. 14-16. Art by Dan Jurgens and Paul Ryan.


These images are not explicitly related to Lia herself. However, like many other comics in the Tangent line, they relate how the Tangent universe developed vastly from how the DCU developed. Culturally, historically, and politically – thanks to the first Tangent Atom–, superheroes have played a huge part in society.

Basically, this is here so you can have just one sliver of an idea how Lia’s world works.

The war in Czechoslovakia (TANGENT’s Vietnam) is a violent land battle between the United States and the Soviet Union. The two nations are deadly enemies because of the Cuban missile crisis in 1962, which ended with nuclear weapons wiping out Cuba, Florida, and parts of the southern U.S.

The only bright spot is the ATOM, a nuclear hero who came to America’s defense when the bombs were flying. Naturally, America expects the Atom to fight in Czechoslovakia. When he doesn’t, CAPTAIN COMET, as well as ordinary soldiers like the METAL MEN, must take his place.

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Green Lantern issue #1’s editorial, “Lighting the Green Lantern” section.