tamora pierce books

4

The full set at last! 

These days everyone’s all about sparkly vampires and tyrannical dictatorships trying to make you get with cute boys, and I’m just over here with my 90s YA heroine, who hangs out with marmosets and egg-laying mammals and rides dinosaur skeletons over tyrannical dictatorships before breakfast. 

I really wanted to stick a tubby little duck-billed platypus into the final cover - and I still might. Don’t tempt me!

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What to read after Throne of Glass

If you, like me, are still going through complete Sarah J Maas withdrawal, and can’t really stand to wait for her next books, check out the list below to tide you over! Each book has many of the things I adored about both ToG and ACOMAF: strong and interesting female characters, magic, deeply beautiful writing, love stories to cry about, and an all around sense of adventure. If you have any more recommendations to add, definitely let me know!

Black Jewels: Anne Bishop

I just finished this series, and I am still amazed by how masterfully Anne Bishop weaves her stories. Welcome to the Dark Kingdom, a matriarchal realm ruled by strong queens and the males that support and serve them (Rowan and Aedion anyone?). There is a prophecy fortelling the rise of a Queen with more power than even the High Lord of Hell himself, which gives us a wonderful story full of scheming, war, adventure, and a badass court I would kill to be a part of. Prepare your heart!

Graceling by Kristian Cashore

Graceling is the best series for all you folks who couldn’t get enough of badass assassin Celaena. Katsa is an assassin Celaena would be proud of, due to her rare ability as a Graceling. She is Graced with a killing power, and has spent her life as the king’s tool in doling out his reign of terror. In waltzes Po, Graced with fighting, and here to shake everything Katsa knows about her world. Cashore definitely gives us a twist Sarah would most certainly support!

The Winner’s Curse by Marie Rutkoski

This book aligns more with the romance and court mystique that Sarah presents so wonderfully in ToG and ACOMAF. Kestrel is the daughter of a general who helped the emperor conquer territory after territory. As she is faced with a choice, marry or join the military, Kestrel finds a friend in one of the slaves from the conquered people, and so begins one of the most interesting political schemes I have read in awhile! I haven’t finished the trilogy yet, because I am out of the country and can’t get my hands on the final book, but I would highly recommend it.

Mistborn by Brandon Sanderson

Cue another really cool empire written by an author who isn’t afraid to be inventive or go beyond the normal realms of fantasy. Vin is another Celaena-esque character, as the abandoned street child who turned thief who struggles to stay alive. When a mentor takes her under his wing, she discovers that her luck on the streets might be more than she could ever explain. Magic, mystery, and of course, a few court balls thrown in make for a wonderful mix. Warning: the last book made me cry. Like really cry. But in a good, I’m-still-mad-at-you-but-I-understand-and-respect-your-story-line type of way.

Demon King by Cinda Williams Chima

Raisa is everything that I have ever wanted in a princess. She is intelligent, passionate, feisty, and super compassionate. So when a war arises between the clans and the wizards, you can bet she has goals to achieve and empires to shake up. Throw Han Alister into the mix, a street wise leader, and things get tricky and fireworks explode. One of my favorite love stories in a long time, because it isn’t a story about just romantic love, but also what the love of a princess for her country can do. 

Poison Study by Maria V. Snyder

Yelena is set for execution for murder, but is given the choice to be the next food taster of the Commander of Ixia. As if the threat of having poison in her system wasn’t enough, she is also given a dose of Butterfly’s Dust, which she needs every day to stay alive, and can of course only get from the chief of security. Fighting for her life soon becomes more than just guessing the right poison, but also a game of magic, love, and all out war. Best kind of combo out there!

Legend by Marie Lu

This is the only book in the list to be set in a dystopian universe as opposed to a kingdom, but with a prodigy like June, no one can make any complaints. After a war tore the country apart, the Western United States is under the martial rule of the Republic, and June is their perfectly groomed soldier golden child. Day, on the other hand, is a slums boy who has become the Republic’s most wanted criminal. What happens when their paths cross is enough to make any country tremble, and to keep me hanging on to every word!

And finally:

Literally anything by Tamora Pierce!

Tamora Pierce has been my favorite author since I was a little girl. Each of her series is set in the same universe, based around the story of an interesting and kickass female character, from the first female warrior to a wild-mage. I first found these stories when my mother decided my sister and I didn’t have enough strong women in our literature and Tamora really rose to the occasion. Start with the first series, Song of the Lioness, and work your way from there! I have reread her books at least once every year since I was a little girl and they get better every time. I cannot recommend these books enough!


If you read or have read any of these books, feel free to shoot me a message; I am always ready to geek out over them. 

“I want a YA book with a non-virginal female protagonist who isn’t slut shamed!”

You want Tamora Pierce.

“I want a YA book with girls who actually get their periods and that doesn’t ignore the whole subject!”

Tamora Pierce!

“I want a YA book with a girl protagonist who isn’t skinny and flawlessly beautiful!”

I’ve got good news for you, my friend: Tamora Pierce

“I want a YA book with girls who–”

T A M O R A    P I E R C E

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Community Post: 10 Fantasy Authors Who Fight The Patriarchy, Gender-Stereotypes, And Possibly Dragons
These writers know that being a hero isn't about gender and that gals are just as powerful, smart, flawed, and awesome as guys. So grab a sword, summon your magic, and get ready to fight evil.
By Sede Makonnen
Book Recommendations for Tamora Pierce lovers (pt. 1)

Our followers recommend:

The Farsala Trilogy by Hilari Bell

“One of the POV characters is a woman and she’s really kick ass. Plus there’s war, magic, rebellion, spies, lots of really awesome characters and a mule that thinks he’s a duck.” 

Uprooted by Naomi Novik

“It’s FANTASTIC.”

The Ranger’s Apprentice by John Flanagan

“The main characters are men, but the women are kickass and actually have important functioning roles in the plot!”


We recommend:

Literally Anything by Brandon Mull (Fablehaven or the Beyonders especially)

You might feel weird picking up a 600-page-each-book series written for 5-8th graders but believe me when I say that these books are so damn phenomenal, you’ll be glad you did. Really imaginative stories. Good characters. Patton Burgess.

The Name of the Wind (of The Kingkiller Chronicle series) by Patrick Rothfuss

A more adult fantasy novel that is so unbelievably good I can’t even put it into words. Just do it.

Sabriel by Garth Nix

A classic. No explanation needed.

An Ember in the Ashes by Sabaa Tahir

We love a good two-perspective story. Bonus points for supporting an author who is a WOC!

The Young Elites by Marie Lu

This story is not without its weak moments, but A+ for a non-Medieval England setting and main characters with physical deformities. Also revenge is good.

A Court of Thorns and Roses by Sarah J Maas

Beauty and the Beast retelling. Curses, trials, fairies. If for nothing else, read for the scene where the protag gets mad at the two male characters and paints portraits of their faces on pigs’ bodies for hours.