tamama cosplay

wonder-mechanic  asked:

How did you make your tamama cosplay sweatshirt? o: I really want to make one.

ohmigosh. ohmigosh. someone messaged me.

Okay man.

So the real magic to the sweatshirt is the pattern used to make it. Everything else is just simple sewing.


The pattern set for this project are constructed of four pieces: front body, back body, hood, and sleeve. You can make your own pattern out of a sweater you already own. (Make sure its a sweater that fits you really well and comfortably).


(I’m sorry I don’t have pictures man. I know it might be confusing man but the cameras broken and shit)


So start with your paper. Nice big paper that can fit the sweater onto it. (I used old architecture my dad gets me from his work).


Take your sweater. Lay it down nice and flat on the paper, so that the front and back are flat and straight against each other (don’t forget the arms and shoulders). Make sure you make the hood flat too! Put it’s center seam in the middle so that the hood front is facing the shirt front.


Trace the sweater down it’s sides, from the end of the arm hole to the end of the sweatshirt (not that elastic strip on the bottom). The sweatshirt. Now trace from the top of the arm hole to the start of the hood (A.K.A the shoulders).
Okay so now that you’ve done that to all open sides, take off the sweatshirt and adjust your lines that way they’re straight (USE A RULER). For the curve of your shirt, where the hood would be, examine the shape of the curve on the sweatshirt. Free hand that for the neckhole/ hood place.


For the arm holes you want to take both of the sweatshirt sleeves and bring then to the inside (turn them inside out). Flatten it to the best of your ability and put the sweatshirt back on the pattern. You should have something that looks like a sleeveless shirt. Trace the curve from the top of your arm hole to the bottom. Adjust accordingly.


Now that your sure you have a perfect pattern, add seam allowance. I put ½ seam on everything. You now have the front part. Cut it out, you’ll need it to make the back.


For the back, it is the same as the front save for the neck curve. If you’ll notice on most shirts, the back of the top has a straighter edge on neck curve. If you notice on your sweatshirt, it should be the same. So just add a straighter edge or free hand the seam you see on the sweatshirt. Add Seam Allowance.


The hood is simple. It’s broken down into two parts, both identical to eachother. There is a seam in the middle of the hood, the center seam. Take your sweatshirt and crease the hood so that the edge of the hood and the center seam are flat (like you’re cutting the hood in half). The drawing should have one straight edge, the curve of the hood, and a nech curve that fits into your front and back patterns like a puzzle piece (you may have to play around with this for a little. Make sure your hood neck curve and your shirt neck curve fit into one another, otherwise everything will be blown out of place) Add seam allowance.
If you want the ability to pull your hood in like a drawstring, add an extra 1 inch or 1 ½ inch to the edges.


For the sleeves I did the same thing as before, lay it on it’s seams and trace the shape. Add seam allowance. If you want a short sleeve then take a short sleeve shirt with the lenght you want and measure it. Measure off that lenght on the pattern and add seam allowance.


NOW YOUR PATTERNS ARE DONE.
TIME TO SEW BABY SEW.


Sewing it real basic. All it takes is sewing a straight seam then surging the edges.
All I’m gonna tell you is how much fabric you’ll need.


Preferabley 2 ½- 3 yards of blue jersey. I used the blue for the outside and the lining. WHICH YOU NEED. You need lining in order for the hood to work (because the drawstring runs through the gap between lining and outerfabric) . Suck it up and buy the fabric.


1 yard of white jersey. The belly of the shirt was free handed so just look at tamama and cut something.


You’ll need fabric paint. Green. Black. Yellow. For the symbol.

Dude I apologize if stuff is vauge and shit. I’m not that good at explaining how I sew stuff. I wasn’t properly taught or anything so the stuff I learn works for me in my head, which can be confusing and all.

-Mooie