talk that talk era

It is sad to see the Blurryface era come to an end. An era filled with mystery, strength, mayhem, building new relationships, testing the older ones, connecting us all in new ways, and giving us all another album to scream our hearts out to. But, remember that the end of this amazing era brings a new one right on the horizon. We’ve made it this far kids, just hold on until until the next time.

  • Jesse: So we were training today right? And so he tells me about this new deflect ability he has and I called bullshit and then he reflected a bullet so it shot off my belt buckle and knocked me on my ass! It was incredible!
  • Gabe: Jesse-
  • McCree: And THEN after that he was showing me some hand to hand combat and those leg knives of his? He activated one while going for what looked like a roundhouse kick but nearly sliced the dummies head off!
  • Gabe: Jesse please-
  • McCree: Afterwards we got together and he took his face-plate off in front of my for the first time. God, boss, he's so beautiful, I think I'm in love with-
  • Gabe: JESSE. As nice it is to hear you so happy IT IS THREE IN THE MORNING.
Victorian Slang'

-AFTERNOONIFIED
A society word meaning “smart.” Forrester demonstrates the usage: “The goods are not ‘afternoonified’ enough for me.”

-ARFARFAN’ARF
A figure of speech used to describe drunken men. “He’s very arf’arf’an’arf,” Forrester writes, “meaning he has had many ‘arfs,’” or half-pints of booze.

- BACK SLANG IT
Thieves used this term to indicate that they wanted “to go out the back way.”

-BAGS O’ MYSTERY
An 1850 term for sausages, “because no man but the maker knows what is in them. … The ‘bag’ refers to the gut which contained the chopped meat.”

- BANG UP TO THE ELEPHANT
This phrase originated in London in 1882, and means “perfect, complete, unapproachable.”

- BATTY-FANG
Low London phrase meaning “to thrash thoroughly,” possibly from the French battre a fin.

-BENJO
Nineteenth century sailor slang for “A riotous holiday, a noisy day in the streets.”

- BOW WOW MUTTON
A naval term referring to meat so bad “it might be dog flesh.”

- BRICKY
Brave or fearless. “Adroit after the manner of a brick,” Forrester writes, “said even of the other sex, ‘What a bricky girl she is.’”

- BUBBLE AROUND
A verbal attack, generally made via the press. Forrester cites The Golden Butterfly: “I will back a first-class British subject for bubbling around against all humanity.”

-BUTTER UPON BACON
Extravagance. Too much extravagance. “Are you going to put lace over the feather, isn’t that rather butter upon bacon?”

-CAT-LAP
A London society term for tea and coffee “used scornfully by drinkers of beer and strong waters … in club-life is one of the more ignominious names given to champagne by men who prefer stronger liquors.”

-CHURCH-BELL
A talkative woman.

- CHUCKABOO
A nickname given to a close friend.

- COLLIE SHANGLES
Quarrels. A term from Queen Victoria’s journal, More Leaves, published in 1884: “At five minutes to eleven rode off with Beatrice, good Sharp going with us, and having occasional collie shangles (a Scottish word for quarrels or rows, but taken from fights between dogs) with collies when we came near cottages.”

-COP A MOUSE
To get a black eye. “Cop in this sense is to catch or suffer,” Forrester writers, “while the colour of the obligation at its worst suggests the colour and size of the innocent animal named.”

- DADDLES
A delightful way to refer to your rather boring hands.

-DAMFINO
This creative cuss is a contraction of “damned if I know.”

Air kiss? (ㅂ=ㅂ) ♥ ( ° ♡ ° ) (x)

Someone said ks could say 죽어 (you die lmao). But it doesn’t make sense bcoz ks’s mouth was closed and only his lips were protruded. In the beginning, it seems like kd was talking coz ks was smiling towards ji’s direction. Then, you can see ji turned around and walked ahead. Ks was smiling/talking to someone behind him. Then, ji turned his head towards ks and pouted (?). You can see his lips from the side. Ks’s copied his gesture. Kd air kiss once became one of the related searches for kadi on naver. Mama era kd re young and childish. lel.

10

@pquois​ asked: wiggle wiggle or i’m ill?

Excerpts from interview with Johan “Shellback” Schuster (from 2015)

His artist name Shellback is fittingly from professor Shellback in the Swedish cartoon Bamse - a logical and technical genius that has a solution for everything. And also a person that sleeps a lot at his workplace and may seem a bit absent. 

A more intelligible way to understand how Johan thinks is to listen to his works. “Shake It Off” with Taylor Swift was, together with Megan Trainor’s “All About That Bass”, the song that dominated the year of pop music in 2014. If you haven’t heard “Shake It Off” a hundred times you are obviously allergic to electricity.


Anyone who thinks there is a formula for pop hit records is a sloppy listener. The songwriters and artists that try to sound like the others on the charts can become successful - for a while - but they soon fall into oblivion. On the contrary, the biggest songs are those that break the norm, the ones that do not follow any rules other than gut feeling.

Shake It Off (billboard #1 for 4 weeks) didn’t sound like any other modern hit song at the time of its release. The song starts with a five second long drum intro - old fashioned acoustic drums - something that is unheard of on commercial radio.

It is Johan playing the drums on Shake It Off. It is also Johan playing guitar, bass, keyboard and shouting in the background.

Songwriting on Shake It Off is credited to Shellback, Max Martin (Johan’s discoverer and mentor) and Taylor herself.

Johan further explains:
-  Shake It off was the next to last song we recorded for the album. The other was actually Blank Space (billboard #1 for 7 weeks). With Taylor one can work very quickly, sometimes we wrote a song a day. When we met 6 months after our first session we felt like there was a type of song missing.

How do you know that?
-  Basically it’s a kind of pleasing frustration. How good everything feels. We’re home, we have everything we need. But, at the same time… a feeling of… something missing. Something that breaks from the other stuff. Something more light-hearted. Pharrell had just released Happy and that song was on our minds. When we worked with Taylor on the last album, which was the first time she didn’t write everything herself, we did We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together. It had a different feel than her other songs. It had a more fun and flirty feel to it. We felt that maybe we needed a song like that.

-  Taylor usually has a solid idea when she comes in, but this time we had nothing. It is also uncommon for Martin and me to work that way. We usually come well prepared to a session. So we just sat there. What the hell do we do now? We started playing music to each other to get reference points. Someone that happened to be me said, how about doing something in the same tempo as Hey Ya by Outkast? Something faster and more drum based?

-  In the studio there was a drum kit set up and ready to go. I went in and played something just for fun. We later on used that very recording for the song. What you hear is played live. We really thought of it as a sketch - all right, now we have a tempo to work on - but it often happens that you keep the demo even though it isn’t perfect, since there is more feeling in it. Martin was humming something, Taylor was humming something else. There was a mellotron. I found a brass sound and started playing something really bad on purpose (duh duh duh, exactly what is heard on Shake It Off). Martin instantly said: “That is awesome”. If he had not said that I would have moved on and tried something else. 

-  What we had didn’t really feel like chorus chords, but just as we were packing up for the day Taylor wrote a falling melody that sounded really hooky. We still didn’t know what it was. Is it a chorus? A verse? Me and Martin listened to it in the car on the way home and we were shaking our heads. Is this good? Is it shit? The next day after we had slept on it, which is the best thing you can do, we realized that we had been humming it all morning. The rest of the song wrote itself very naturally. Taylor wrote the lyrics in 30 minutes.

It is an incredibly clever lyric, a comment to her life situation as a tabloid target.
-  She is a hell of a writer, personal and broad at the same time. And the speed of it is unreal. I don’t get how she does it. If I was to write about my life it would be the most boring lyric in the world (starts singing the Shake It Off melody): “I go to the studio every day…”