talk southern

erynn-lafae  asked:

Can you talk a bit about Southern folk magic? What's that like? How'd you learn it? What makes it distinctly Southern?

@erynn-lafae​ First, I’m so sorry it’s taken me so long to get back to you! I was so excited for this ask, but life just got in the way. I’m also gonna tag @winebrightruby​ cause I know she asked me a long time ago and I never really got to discuss it. 

So, I’ll start with a little background on the term “Southern Folk Magic.” Obviously, hopefully anyway, the term is to denote regional variations of folk magic practiced in the US South. That said, I use it as an umbrella term for the practices that happen Down South because there are TONS. We tend to talk about the South as a whole, but what many folks from outside the region don’t seem to realize is just how much diversity there is down here. Like I mentioned here, there are tons of subregions in the South and just as our food, accents, and dialects are different, so can our magical practices be. My personal experiences have been in Memphis/Mississippi Delta/North Mississippi and Knoxville/East Tennessee/Southern Appalachia. I’ll be addin Atlanta and hopefully North Georgia to that list soon, but not quite yet. 

For those not from the Delta region, Memphis is often jokingly referred to as “the capitol of Mississippi.” This is largely cultural and demographic and I’ve long said “Memphis will always be more Mississippi than it’s ever been Tennessee.” And the older I get, the more true that seems to be. According to the 2010 census, Mississippi has a 37% Black population. It has also seen the largest increase in people reporting to be of “mixed race.” Memphis has a 61% Black population, with many of these folks bein the direct descendants of freed slaves who moved out of the rural South and into a city. And in West Tennessee, which runs from the Western border of the state to the western bifurcation of the Tennessee river and represented by the far left star on our state flag, even small towns often have 30%+ Black populations whereas Knoxville, the largest city in East Tennessee, only has a 13% Black population. So the folk magic I grew up around in Memphis is largely influenced by Black folks whereas East Tennessee Appalachian folk magic is much more influenced by Cherokee and Scots-Irish practices. 

So, when I moved to Knoxville for college, it was absolute culture shock. I wasn’t actively or knowingly practicing magic at that point, but the foundations had been laid. I got a blue doormat for the front door because that’s what you do. Now I realize this comes from a West African idea that harmful spirits can’t cross water and the blue doormat (or painting the underside of your porch roof) will hopefully confuse em. I’ve since learned this is common in Carolina Lowcountry from the Gullah-Geechee people, so I’m not sure the exact lineage of me learnin it, but it’s somethin I still do. Little things like this abound and I honestly only think about it when I find myself doin one of em.

Another tradition I grew up around is water-witchin water dowsing. The first time I heard the term as a kid, I was confused, but both of my grandparents on my daddy’s side could do it and it basically involves balancin a forked stick and when it drops, that’s where you dig your well. Other people use 2 sticks or metal rods and wait for em to cross. Either way, it seems to work.

I also wear a dime on a red string on my right ankle for good luck and to avert “the evil eye.” This is somethin a childhood friend’s grandmother made for me the first time sayin, “honey, you just need it.” And I think she was right. This is a practice that, from what I’ve read, also comes from African tradition, but specifically what or where has been all over West Africa. But the red string also carries over into Irish lore on good luck and as a Gaelic Polytheist, it makes a perfect blend of practices for me.

There’s also what I feel like is a broder American tradition that comes to us likely from the Irish of hangin a horseshoe above the door. Modern folklore says to hang it points up so that the “luck doesn’t run out,” but it also seems to do have to do with the idea that horseshoes are traditionally iron and the fae don’t like iron.

In East Tennessee, it’s not unheard of to see a tree with ribbons or scraps tied to it. The type of tree varies, but the idea is similar to Buddhist prayer flags (for a more recognized practice) and seems to come from the Gaels that settled in the area. But over heard people say it has Indigenous ties, too. How much of that is true and how much is “Cherokee Princess Syndrome” as I like to call it, I just don’t know. That’s one thing about bein down here; we’ve created a string cultural identity that, regardless of how it happened, mashed cultural practices together that there’s just no tellin where some of em exactly come from. And that’s honestly part of what makes it “Southern.” Our culture is an amalgamation of various African cultures, Irish and German immigrants, Acadians, French and Spanish historical colonization and influence, and countless indigenous cultures. If the stories of how that happened weren’t so absolutely mortifying, it could be beautiful, but we’ll always carry the wounds and scars of the past, imo.

As for how I learned, it’s been a wild ride. A lot of things I just learned culturally growin up. When you’re “born in the South, given to a town raised on hand to mouth,” a lot of things I’d now qualify as folk Magic are just a part of life. But as I’ve grown and begun intentionally practicing, I’ve read everything I can. Lots of times, this means pickin through charlatans and pseudo-intellectual horseshit. It means often bein VERY wary of other white folks claimin to know anything about anything. I’ve talked to older folks who practice and try to learn what they’re willin to teach. But it’s been a tough road. And that, along with other historical factors, are why I don’t use terms like hoodoo for my practice. I think hoodoo is a form of Southern Folk Magic, but it also has its own specific history and practices ties to the Christianization and slavery of African peoples. I’ve found a lot of similarities in my practices and Hoodoo™, but I also have a much more heavy and specific Irish influence because of bein a Gaelic Polytheist than a lot of other folks.

So, as with most topics, it’s incredibly nuanced and I’m sure I’ve left somethin out or even said somethin that wasn’t super clear, so if there are any questions, shoot! And if there are any other folks that practice Southern Folk Magic or Southern-influenced Magic, hit me up! I’d love to hear from y'all cause lord does it feel lonely sometimes. We can pm here, send me asks, hit me up on twitter, or shoot me an email at TheModernSouthernPolytheist@gmail.com.  

d&d setting where all the elves use too many apostrophes because they talk with a southern accent, featuring the magical sword y’all’d’ve

Voltron:
  • <p> <b>Lance:</b> hi Keith your mullet is gross but you're good looking~<p/><b>Keith:</b> what in tarnation<p/><b>Lance:</b> ...<p/><b>Shiro:</b> don't worry I speak my lil bro's weird Texan he meant to say "what the hell"<p/><b>Lance:</b> that makes a lot more sense now...<p/></p>

why does no one ever talk about the southern dalish clans of thedas? the ones from origins?

and by that i mean their weird, horrible pronunciation of elvhen.

in dragon age 2 and inquisition, you’ve got your graceful, correct way of saying things like “lethallin.” “andaran atishan.” “ma serannas!” 

and then there’s just…the southern clan. you know the one.

“UhnDAYruhn aTEEshun!”

“Dayreth Sheeral!”

the northern clans don’t talk to them. don’t talk about them. they hear the gentle whisper of “mah seerenus” on the wind and shudder.

Signs as I've known them:

Aries: driving fast late at night, running from the cops, listening to the neighborhood, swimming with just a big tee shirt on, jealousy and fighting, working out.

Taurus: listening to loud music, saving animals, walking through the forest barefoot, eating at Waffle House late at night, bonfires, candles and fairy lights.

Gemini: dorky laughs, a love of Las Vegas, winged eye makeup, dressing up for Halloween even when you’re a little too old, sarcasm, goodie bags.

Cancer: looking at the stars, sweaters, heavy eyes, aesthetically pleasing Instagram feeds, funny voice impressions, playing video games.

Leo: running together, a slight southern twang, talking about tv shows, fighting over a boy, yoga, sharing food, talking in a warm room, “you’re better than that”

Virgo: hula hooping, eating fruit, stick and poke tattoos, running through the night, dying our hair crazy colors, a deep voice, writing together, flying to California, ballet.

Libra: cuddling, drinking lots of caffeine, buying expensive gifts, rambling together and cracking each other up, smoking on the porch under the stars, freckles, warm showers.

Scorpio: Holding cats, watching people at the restaurant, dying your hair different colors, vintage cartoons, eating chocolate cake late at night, lace.

Sagittarius: playing guitar, strong opinions, a love of dogs, auburn hair, yelling at the cops, a dark sense of humor, laying in a hammock

Capricorn: simplistic art in black ink, mood swings, love of daisies, tea and honey, a relationship with a large age gap, Mac and cheese, flannels, driving around in an old truck.

Aquarius: helps me with my hair, sarcastic sense of humor, cat eyed glasses, bright lipstick, seeming permanently young, watching gameshows in the morning, drinking tea, dressing up in costumes.

Pisces: swimming late at night, scratching each other’s backs, watching scary movies, crying on the bed, coloring together, pushing around in grocery carts, dancing as we clean, shopping for lingerie.

6

Now, don’t you worry about my strength. I have plenty.

Southern Talk™
  • Lance: Keith, did you see that? It was amazing.
  • Keith: Y'all did if I did.
  • Lance: Oh God.
  • Keith: What? It's my normal talk. Have you not heard it yet? It ain't something special.
  • Lance: OH GOD...
  • Keith: You're overeacting to my normal talk, Lance. Y'ain't gotta make such a big deal.
  • Lance: I need to go.
  • Keith: .... okay bye....

au where everything’s the same except Remus talks like an old southern woman.

“Y'all please”

“Harry, Harry… Bless your heart”

“Severus, I swear to the Lord, if you don’t shut your trap this instant, I’ll stick a sock in in for you”

*puts hands over Harry’s ears* “Little ears, you silly fucking asshat”

“Well, Harry, back when I was a boy”

*something happens* “Well, I never”

And who could forget:

“Sirius Black… Well, butter my butt and call me a biscuit”

i have had the unfortunate opportunity to grow up in a part of the south, and i heard pretty much all of these things at some point in my life. i’m not exaggerating. feel free to add.

i don’t know how to put this into words very well, but we need to talk about christianized abuse of women
i am from the south. my extended family lives in the deep rural south, and they are very religious. we need to talk about how christian girls are taught that they need a man to guide them because they are like children who can’t think clearly. we need to talk about how christian men are encouraged and instructed to “discipline” their wives by scolding them as if they are stupid naughty kids. we need to talk about how christian girls are taught that they are valuable only in relation to a man and how she can take care of him and support him.
we need to talk about how southern women are born as property of their father and then are “given away” to their husbands who then fill the role of their father, treating them as things to be controlled and dressed up and trained because women are too sinful and foolish and selfish to be let alone.

Black Paladin Shiro VS. Black Paladin Keith
  • Black Paladin Shiro: Is everyone all right?
  • Team Voltron: Yeah, we're all okay!
  • ~
  • Black Paladin Keith: Are y'all okay?
  • Pidge: ...
  • Hunk: ...
  • Lance: ... Does anyone understand what the quiznak Keith just said?

ok there have been a ton of “DUI stops” in the area but the rumors going around socal is that they are immigration checkpoints. i can barely find any news coverage but according to the new york times police are calling it “fake news” and claim that they are just setting up DUI stops for the superbowl. i live in a rundown primarily latinx neighborhood and the day those rumors started there was a “DUI stop” just down the street.. on thursday. 4 days from the superbowl? starting at like noon ending at around 7 pm? ive lived here for 11 years and theres never been a checkpoint bc this isnt a particularly busy street.. idk you guys

sugar--pie  asked:

Hans is sick and Elsa taking care of him? (The helsa request box thing)

HMHMHMHMHMHM YESS YESYSYEY

Hans hates being sick I would think so he’s a big pouty baby while Elsa just loves on the big child

let him curse