talisman

This is Selenite! It is named after the Greek word “Selene,” which means moon. It has a moonlike glow when polished. This is one of those special few in the crystal realm that doesn’t require charging. 

Selenite has such a cool property in that it can be used to cleanse your other crystals and stones! Awesome! Just lay the crystals in need of cleansing on top or touching a piece of Selenite for about 15-30 minutes and let this gorgeous crystal clear them! It’s able to do this because of its unique ability to clear blockages or pathways of energy.

Selenite vibrates with a rather high energy. This makes is a great stone for the mind! Some of the lore states that if you and your partner are fighting, exchanging a Selenite stone will bring peace to the relationship.

And lastly, this interesting healing stone is a very powerful protection talisman. It is said to protect the wearer from outside dangers and protect the home when placed in a prominent location.

This particular piece is available here.

Mărțișor aesthetic

Mărțișor is a Romanian celebration at the beginning of spring, on March the 1st in Romania, Moldova, and all territories inhabited by Romanians. The word Mărțișor is the diminutive of marț, the old folk name for March (martie, in modern Romanian), and thus literally means “little March”.

Mărțișor, marț and mărțiguș are all names for the red and white string with hanging tassel customarily given on the 1st day of March.

Giving this talisman to people is an old custom, and it is believed that the wearer will be strong and healthy for the year to come. It is also a symbol of the coming spring. Usually, both women and men wear it pinned to their clothes, close to the heart, until the last day of March, when they tie it to a fruit-tree twig. In some regions, a gold or silver coin hangs on the string and is worn around the neck. After wearing it for a certain length of time, they buy red wine and sweet cheese with the coin, according to a belief that their faces would remain beautiful and white as cheese and rubicund as the wine, all year. In modern times, and especially in urban areas, the Mărțișor lost most of its talisman properties and became more a symbol of friendship, love, appreciation and respect.

The Witches Ladder

Witches ladders (also known as witch’s ladders) are a type of knot magic that can be used for a wide variety of purposes. They are commonly made by braiding or knotting cords together while incorporating other materials that represent the intention of the creator. Witches ladders can be easily customized for every practitioner and used for nearly any purpose, making them a very versatile and convenient talisman to create. Witches ladders can be used for purposes like attracting or manifesting things, creating a more positive environment, warding off negative entities or energies, protecting yourself or others, or banishing certain behaviors or individuals, just to name a few.

To make a basic witches ladder, you will need:

- Several cords of equal length in colors of your choice

- Whatever materials you choose to weave into the cords (such as feathers, bones, herbs, hair, flowers, seashells, ribbons, beads, hag stones, sticks, crystals, keys, charms, etc.)

Optional but helpful:

- Tape

- A ruler

Some other ideas: You can incorporate pieces of paper with sigils drawn on them, drawstring bags filled with herbs or crystals, or personal symbolic items that have been made from clay or another material. If you are making a witches ladder for an individual, you may wish to include a taglock (a personal item that is strongly associated with the target) to further bond the person to the talisman. Taglocks may include hair, jewelry, etc. Depending on your practice, you may wish to incorporate numerology into your witches ladder by using a specific number of knots, number of cords, or number of items used.

For my witches ladder, I used thick dark green yarn, twine, seashells, goose feathers, ribbon, a pine cone, and a sand dollar. I chose to arrange my goose feathers with the smallest ones at the top and the largest ones at the bottom. I also decided to make a double witches ladder purely for aesthetic reasons, but you can stick to one or make as many as you want.

Creating the witches ladder

1. Start by gathering your materials and getting your cords ready to knot or braid. It may help to tie the cords together on one end and tape the knotted end to a table or another surface. I found that doing so helps to prevent the cords from getting tangled in the process and it helps maintain a nice tension while braiding.

2. As you braid or knot your cords, begin adding your chosen materials. You may wish to recite something or chant as you are doing this, but it is not necessary. Depending on how many items you are using, you may wish to space them out evenly. For this, a ruler may come in handy. In my own experience, I have found that certain materials such as feathers, herbs, flowers, and certain bones can be difficult to braid around. It may be helpful to braid the cords first and then insert your objects into the braid later on.

3. Continue braiding or knotting until you have made your witches ladder as long as you would like it. To finish your witches ladder, you may choose to simply tie off the cords, or you may choose to add something extra to the end. I chose to add a pine cone and ribbon to one of my witches ladders, and a sand dollar to the other. Finish off your witches ladder however you see fit.

4. Hang your witches ladder. You may wish to hang it near a doorway in your home, near your bed, or even outside. The best location for your talisman will depend on both it’s intended purpose and your personal preference. If you have cats or other mischievous pets, it may be a good idea to hang your witches ladder up high or out of their reach.

-theowloracle

Please do not remove source

Neo-Assyrian Obsidian Lamaštu Demon Magic Amulet, 8th-7th Century BC

See it in 360°

The obverse with an incised image of the demon Lamashtu with head of a bird facing right, striding right, with an elongated body, her arms raised in a threatening posture, a seated dog to lower right in profile with comb above; a piglet in profile to lower left with spindle above; an uncertain ‘sideways-T’ symbol at top left corner and donkey’s ankle to top right; a line of cuneiform text, which translates to “Incantation.” The reverse has seven lines of cuneiform text that translates as: “Incantation, O Lamashtu, daughter of Anu, thou art great among the gods. Be conjured by the heavens and be conjured by the earth.“

In Mesopotamian mythology, Lamashtu was a female demon, monster, malevolent goddess or demigoddess who menaced women during childbirth and, if possible, kidnapped their children while they were breastfeeding. She would gnaw on their bones and suck their blood, as well as being charged with a number of other evil deeds. Lamashtu is depicted as a mythological hybrid, with a hairy body, a lioness’ head with donkey’s teeth and ears, long fingers and fingernails, and the feet of a bird with sharp talons. She is often shown standing or kneeling on a donkey, nursing a pig and a dog, and holding snakes. She thus bears some functions and resemblance to the Mesopotamian demon Lilith.

Lamashtu’s father was the Sky God Anu. Unlike many other usual demonic figures and depictions in Mesopotamian lore, Lamashtu was said to act in malevolence of her own accord, rather than at the gods’ instructions. Along with this her name was written together with the cuneiform determinative indicating deity. This means she was a goddess or a demigoddess in her own right. She bore seven names and was described as seven witches in incantations. Her evil deeds included: slaying children; causing harm to mothers and expectant mothers; eating men and drinking their blood; disturbing sleep; bringing nightmares; destroying crops; infesting rivers and lakes; and being a bringer of disease, sickness, and death.

Pazuzu, a god or demon, was invoked to protect birthing mothers and infants against Lamashtu’s malevolence, usually on amulets, such as this one, and statues. Although Pazuzu was said to be bringer of famine and drought, he was also invoked against evil for protection, and against plague, but he was primarily and popularly invoked against his fierce, malicious rival Lamashtu.

A Spell for Memory and Concentration

Ingredients: 

  • A necklace or other piece of jewelry/object to enchant. I used a hematite necklace, because it enhances memory and intelligence.
  •  Rosemary, for memory and intellect 
  • Peppermint oil, for focus and clarity of mind - A purple candle; purple represents wisdom
  •  A container of some type. I personally use a teacup as my little “cauldron,” but you can use anything from a small bowl to a saucer. 

To cast the spell: 

  •  I prepared by cleansing my necklace with sage. 
  • Put the rosemary in the container and lay the necklace on top. Light the candle. 
  • Drop a few drops of peppermint oil onto the necklace. If you don’t want oil on your necklace/object, you can rub it on your wrists and smell it or anoint the candle with it. 
  • Hold the necklace/object in your hands and say: “this [necklace/name of object] will help me with memory and concentration as I study and take tests in the following week(s). Blessed be." 
  • Blow out the candle and pass the object through the smoke to consecrate it. 
  • I personally seal my spells with a kiss; you can do this, or you can consider it sealed when you pass it through the smoke. 

Wear/carry the necklace/object when studying and taking tests. Since smelling peppermint helps with memory and focus, (it activates the same part of your brain as caffeine does,) I suggest re-anointing or rubbing some on your wrists before tests. 

Charms & Talismans (II)

For Luck

  • Butterfly charms - They are considered to be omens of luck. The gentle fluttering of a butterfly is good fortune. It is a symbol of freedom and perfection in nature. Just as a butterfly is not born, but is metamorphosised into a perfectly symmetrical creature, one’s ill fate can be transformed into good fortune. Butterflies have been associated with wandering, free souls in many different cultures.
  • Acorn - It is said to be an emblem of luck, and is believed to give the gift of youth to the wearer.
  • Astrological talismans - These type of talismans are usually very effective when prescribed according to the specifics of one’s horoscope. It corresponds to a favourably or unfavourably placed planet in the horoscope of the concerned person, and can be acquired to either strengthen or reduce that planet’s effects
  • Feathers - An ancient charm for luck and represents the journey of the soul to the other realm.
  • Keys - Three keys worn together symbolise the unlocking to the doors of health, wealth, and love.
  • Lucky coins - Bring luck to the bearer.

For Protection

  • Corno (horn) - An Italian amulet of ancient origin. It is a gently twisted horn-shaped amulet worn to bring protection against the evil eye, specifically against being cuckolded.
  • Cord charms - Intended to decay, they are put around a child’s wrist or neck, and by the time they wear off, the child is said to be old enough to withstand the “eye”.
  • Rabbit foot - The left hind foot of a rabbit is considered lucky, and the bearer has to rub it to activate the luck. In some sources, it is also said to be good for protection magic, in addition to bringing good fortune.
  • Mano Cornuto - “mano” meaning “hand” and “cornuto” meaning “horn”, the charm represents a hand gesture in which the index and little fingers are extended while the middle and ring fingers are curled into the palm. The reference is to the horned head of an animal. It is used for magical protection against the evil eye. 
  • Abracadabra - Created in biblical times for the benefit and well-being of all humankind by the elite holy men known to history as the Magiits proven ability to compel negative situations to diminish and vanish is legendary.

Crystals & Stones (Various)

For travelling:

  • Carbuncle and chalcedony - Protects sailors from drowning.
  • Quartz - Protects from extreme weather.
  • Banded agate - Protects from surging waves of the ocean.
  • Jet - Provides major protection to the wearer for travelling by river or sea.
  • Amethyst - Can be used as a general protection for travellers.

For courage

  • Aquamarine - Banishes fear.
  • Bloodstone - Provides courage.
  • Carnelian - Provides courage, as well as protection.
  • Agate - Dispels fear.
  • Black tourmaline - A very protective stone which is also excellent for dispelling fears.
  • Blue quartz - Releases fear.

For health:

  • Amazonite - For general health.
  • Green aventurine - Beneficial for blood and circulatory system.
  • Emerald - A very good general healer.
  • Fuschite - Helps mental and physical problems.

Quetzalcoatl Aesthetic ; requested by @margoteve

Quetzalcoatl, the Aztec god of wind and learning, wears around his neck the “wind breastplate” ehecailacocozcatl, “the spirally voluted wind jewel” made of a conch shell. This talisman was a conch shell cut at the cross-section and was likely worn as a necklace by religious rulers, as they have been discovered in burials in archaeological sites throughout Mesoamerica, and potentially symbolized patterns witnessed in hurricanes, dust devils, seashells, and whirlpools, which were elemental forces that had meaning in the Aztec mythology. Among the Aztecs, whose beliefs are the best-documented in the historical sources, Quetzalcoatl was related to gods of the wind, of the planet Venus, of the dawn, of merchants and of arts, crafts and knowledge. He was also the patron god of the Aztec priesthood, of learning and knowledge.

Roman Magic Abraxas Amulet, 2nd-3rd Century AD

Abraxas was an Egyptian Gnostic solar deity.  Amulets and seals bearing the figure of Abraxas were common in the second century AD, and were used as recently as the thirteenth century in the seals of the Knights Templar. By medieval times, Abraxas was relegated to the ranks of demons.

The image most associated with Abraxas is that of a composite creature with the head of a rooster, the body of a man, and legs made of serpents or scorpions. He carries a whip and shield, called wisdom and power, respectively. Abraxas is occasionally depicted driving a chariot drawn by four horses, which represents the four elements.

Amulets such as these (aka Abraxas Stones) bore inscribed formulas or spells and were intended to protect the owner or serve very specific magical purposes to the owner’s benefit. This amulet is made of gold and jasper.

FIRE PROTECTIVE JEWELRY
  • a candle
  • the piece of jewelry you’ve picked out

Cleanse and purify your jewelry, hold it over the flame of the candle, not too close to burn it though or to burn yourself lol. You can kinda swing it around a little bit over the flame and if you’d like you can place some protective crystals around the candle.

While holding it over the flame chant:

“Fire I hold dear in heart

bless this pendant with protection

turn away eyes that seek to harm me

to them make me 

as invisible as I can be

bury any spells casted upon me

in the earth I love dearly

protect me at all times,

protect me at all cost,

turn any harmful energies near me, into dust”