tales of terror (1962)

In celebration of Halloween, I’ve compiled a list of horror films from several different sub-genres along with links to their respective IMDB pages. Please note that the films listed below may contain scenes that some find triggering, disturbing, or upsetting; if you have any concerns over a film’s content, I highly encourage you to research it prior to watching in order to make as informed a choice as possible. 

PSYCHOLOGICAL HORROR: films that inspire fear and tension by creating an unsettling atmosphere.

FEMALE-CENTRIC FILMS: horror movies featuring women in starring roles outside of the “final girl” trope.

GRAPHIC HORROR: films containing depictions of extreme acts, like heavy violence, body horror, and gore. Not recommended for those offended or disturbed by explicit, potentially-upsetting media.

HORROR ANTHOLOGIES: also known as “portmanteau films”, these movies contain multiple short segments that are sometimes connected by a main plot.

THRILLERS: scary stories with a suspenseful plot.

MOVIE MONSTERS: horror films starring a variety of creatures, from vampires and werewolves to Lovecraft monsters and evil clowns.

HORROR CLASSICS: definitive movies from the pre-1970’s horror era.

SUPERNATURAL HORROR: all things paranormal, ghosts and ghouls.

OCCULT AND POSSESSION: movies with rituals, demons, and possessed souls.

ZOMBIES: a category encompassing everything from Romero’s undead to the living infected.

FOUND FOOTAGE: movies comprised of camera footage filmed by hapless characters.

HAVE FUN WATCHING, AND HAPPY HALLOWEEN!

5

This Is What It Looks Like When 152 Black Cats Audition for a Movie

“As far as anyone could remember, it was the biggest invitation to bad luck ever seen in one place.” LIFE wrote.

When it comes to four-legged thespians, canines have generally achieved a greater level of fame than their feline rivals. We fondly remember Lassie, Benji and Toto, but cats seem to face a steeper path to Hollywood stardom. Blame it on the lack of good roles. One role, however—the title character in Edgar Allen Poe’s 1843 short story The Black Cat—offered theatrically inclined kitties a chance to break through. In the story, the cat’s owner plasters him into a wall, along with his murdered wife. Eventually, the animal’s mewing from beyond the grave leads investigators to the woman’s body. The film adaptation, which would appear in the 1962 horror compilation Tales of Terror, adjusted the storyline by weaving in elements of another Poe tale.

Exactly 152 cats showed up for the audition, all of them “considerably less nervous than their owners.” Several were disqualified thanks to white paws or noses, but even for those left in the running, the day left dreams largely dashed. The lead role, it turned out, had already been filled by “a well-known professional cat.” Seven lucky extras, selected on account of having the meanest looking faces, were chosen as understudies.

The audition took place in Hollywood, 1961. All photos were taken by Ralph Crane. (via)