tales of cities

A Tale of Costuming Two Cities

Many of my friends in these here parts know that I am a costume designer for a local theater. My most recent production was a Tale of Two Cities, and its about halfway through it’s month long run. Some have asked for pics and I finally have access to the production photos that they take during early dress rehearsals. I wish I had pics of everything with all the completed details, but these are close enough. 

Dr. Manette is rescued from the Bastille and reunited with his long lost daughter, Lucie at Defarges’ wine shop

The party meets Charles Darnay when they land in Dover.

Sidney Carton, drunkard and part time attorney, tasked with the job of saving Darnay. His boss, Stryver thinks he’ll get the girl. Oh, Stryvie, you adorable creep.

Sydney Carton prods Barsad for information in the Darnay case.

Darnay is accused of spying and put on trial. Witness for the prosecution, John Barsad.

Dr. Manette and Lucie at her marriage to Charles Darnay

Sydney Carton, drunken scoundrel, didn’t get the girl. 

Darnay’s friend in Paris, Gabelle, is in danger as the revolution heats up.

The Marquis St. Everemond is an aristocratic ass, causes most of the troubles in our tale. Sadly, Darnay is his nephew.

Little Gaspard, a Parisian peasant, is killed by the Marquis’ coach. That little nugget of dead sunshine is my own SuperSon3. His death sparks the rage that brings the peasants to violent revolt - and me to tears, every time I see this scene.

You guys, it’s a really sad scene. The song is DEVASTATING.

uh-oh, they woke the sleeping giant. Y’all are gonna get it now.

Paris is in full revolution mode.

The revolution is leveling up, and people have got their gear on. They kill the king and queen in effigy. 

It looks like they are gonna fight West Side Story style. Be cool boy.

Where else would two scallawags such as Jerry Cruncher and John Barsad find themselves than in the midst of revolution. There’s money to be made, folks.

Darnay at the French Tribunal, is sentenced to death. 

Bad decision, Charles. You knew you shouldn’t have gone back to Paris.

Lucie sings her sorrow. Way to go, Charles.

Bardad and Carton cook up a drunken plan - the best kind.

Darnay is saved!!

Mme Defarge is not.

Sydney meets and them comforts the seamstress while he waits to die in Charles’ place. You do you, Carton. It’s a tough choice.

It is a far, far better thing that I do, than I have ever done; it is a far, far better rest that I go to than I have ever known. Cue tears.

Fini

How many have you read?

The BBC estimates that most people will only read 6 books out of the 100 listed below. Reblog this and bold the titles you’ve read.

1 Pride and Prejudice - Jane Austen
2 Lord of the Rings - J. R. R. Tolkein
3 Jane Eyre – Charlotte Bronte
4 Harry Potter series
5 To Kill a Mockingbird - Harper Lee
6 The Bible
7 Wuthering Heights – Emily Bronte
8 Nineteen Eighty Four – George Orwell
9 His Dark Materials – Philip Pullman
10 Great Expectations – Charles Dickens
11 Little Women – Louisa M Alcott
12 Tess of the D’Urbervilles – Thomas Hardy
13 Catch 22 – Joseph Heller
14 Complete Works of Shakespeare
15 Rebecca – Daphne Du Maurier
16 The Hobbit – JRR Tolkien
17 Birdsong – Sebastian Faulks
18 Catcher in the Rye
19 The Time Traveller’s Wife - Audrey Niffeneger
20 Middlemarch – George Eliot
21 Gone With The Wind – Margaret Mitchell
22 The Great Gatsby – F Scott Fitzgerald
23 Bleak House – Charles Dickens
24 War and Peace – Leo Tolstoy
25 The Hitch Hiker’s Guide to the Galaxy – Douglas Adams
26 Brideshead Revisited – Evelyn Waugh
27 Crime and Punishment – Fyodor Dostoyevsky
28 Grapes of Wrath – John Steinbeck
29 Alice in Wonderland – Lewis Carroll
30 The Wind in the Willows – Kenneth Grahame
31 Anna Karenina – Leo Tolstoy
32 David Copperfield – Charles Dickens
33 Chronicles of Narnia – CS Lewis
34 Emma – Jane Austen
35 Persuasion – Jane Austen
36 The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe – CS Lewis
37 The Kite Runner - Khaled Hosseini
38 Captain Corelli’s Mandolin - Louis De Bernieres
39 Memoirs of a Geisha – Arthur Golden
40 Winnie the Pooh – AA Milne
41 Animal Farm – George Orwell
42 The Da Vinci Code – Dan Brown
43 One Hundred Years of Solitude – Gabriel Garcia Marquez
44 A Prayer for Owen Meaney – John Irving
45 The Woman in White – Wilkie Collins
46 Anne of Green Gables – LM Montgomery
47 Far From The Madding Crowd – Thomas Hardy
48 The Handmaid’s Tale – Margaret Atwood
49 Lord of the Flies – William Golding
50 Atonement – Ian McEwan

51 Life of Pi – Yann Martel
52 Dune – Frank Herbert
53 Cold Comfort Farm – Stella Gibbons
54 Sense and Sensibility – Jane Austen
55 A Suitable Boy – Vikram Seth
56 The Shadow of the Wind – Carlos Ruiz Zafon
57 A Tale Of Two Cities – Charles Dickens
58 Brave New World – Aldous Huxley
59 The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time – Mark Haddon
60 Love In The Time Of Cholera – Gabriel Garcia Marquez
61 Of Mice and Men – John Steinbeck
62 Lolita – Vladimir Nabokov
63 The Secret History – Donna Tartt
64 The Lovely Bones - Alice Sebold
65 Count of Monte Cristo – Alexandre Dumas
66 On The Road – Jack Kerouac
67 Jude the Obscure – Thomas Hardy
68 Bridget Jones’s Diary – Helen Fielding
69 Midnight’s Children – Salman Rushdie
70 Moby Dick – Herman Melville
71 Oliver Twist – Charles Dickens
72 Dracula – Bram Stoker
73 The Secret Garden – Frances Hodgson Burnett
74 Notes From A Small Island – Bill Bryson
75 Ulysses – James Joyce
76 The Bell Jar – Sylvia Plath
77 Swallows and Amazons - Arthur Ransome
78 Germinal – Emile Zola
79 Vanity Fair – William Makepeace Thackeray
80 Possession – AS Byatt
81 A Christmas Carol – Charles Dickens
82 Cloud Atlas – David Mitchel
83 The Color Purple – Alice Walker
84 The Remains of the Day – Kazuo Ishiguro
85 Madame Bovary – Gustave Flaubert
86 A Fine Balance – Rohinton Mistry
87 Charlotte’s Web – EB White
88 The Five People You Meet In Heaven – Mitch Albom
89 Adventures of Sherlock Holmes – Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
90 The Faraway Tree Collection – Enid Blyton
91 Heart of Darkness – Joseph Conrad
92 The Little Prince – Antoine De Saint-Exupery
93 The Wasp Factory – Iain Banks
94 Watership Down – Richard Adams
95 A Confederacy of Dunces – John Kennedy Toole
96 A Town Like Alice – Nevil Shute
97 The Three Musketeers – Alexandre Dumas
98 Hamlet – William Shakespeare
99 Charlie and the Chocolate Factory – Roald Dahl
100 Les Miserables – Victor Hugo

  1. “To Kill a Mockingbird” by Harper Lee
  2. “Pride and Prejudice” by Jane Austen
  3. “The Diary of Anne Frank” by Anne Frank
  4. “1984” by George Orwell
  5. Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone" by J.K. Rowling
  6. “The Lord of the Rings” (1-3) by J.R.R. Tolkien
  7. “The Great Gatsby” by F. Scott Fitzgerald
  8. “Charlotte’s Web” by E.B. White
  9. “The Hobbit” by J.R.R. Tolkien
  10. “Little Women” by Louisa May Alcott
  11. “Fahrenheit 451” by Ray Bradbury
  12. “Jane Eyre” by Charlotte Bronte
  13. “Animal Farm” by George Orwell
  14. “Gone with the Wind” by Margaret Mitchell
  15. “The Catcher in the Rye” by J.D. Salinger
  16. “The Book Thief” by Markus Zusak
  17. “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn” by Mark Twain
  18. “The Hunger Games” by Suzanne Collins
  19. “The Help” by Kathryn Stockett
  20. “The Lion, the Witch, and the Wadrobe” by C.S. Lewis
  21. The Grapes of Wrath” by John Steinbeck
  22. “The Lord of the Flies” by William Golding
  23. “The Kite Runner” by Khaled Hosseini
  24. “Night” by Elie Wiesel
  25. “Hamlet” by William Shakespeare
  26. “A Wrinkle in Time” by Madeleine L'Engle
  27. “Of Mice and Men” by John Steinbeck
  28. “A Tale of Two Cities” by Charles Dickens
  29. “Romeo and Juliet” by William Shakespeare
  30. “The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy” by Douglas Adams
  31. “The Secret Garden” by Frances Hodgson Burnett
  32. “A Christmas Carol” by Charles Dickens
  33. “The Little Prince” by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry
  34. “Brave New World” by Aldous Huxley
  35. “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows” by J.K. Rowling
  36. “The Giver” by Lois Lowry
  37. “The Handmaid’s Tale” by Margaret Atwood
  38. “Where the Sidewalk Ends” by Shel Silverstein
  39. “Wuthering Heights” Emily Bronte
  40. “The Fault in Our Stars” by John Green
  41. “Anne of Green Gables” by L.M. Montgomery
  42. “The Adventures of Tom Sawyer” by Mark Twain
  43. “Macbeth” by William Shakespeare
  44. “The Girl with a Dragon Tattoo” by Stieg Larrson  
  45. “Frankenstein” by Mary Shelley
  46. “The Holy Bible: King James Version”
  47. “The Color Purple” by Alice Walker
  48. “The Count of Monte Cristo” by Alexandre Dumas
  49. “A Tree Grows in Brooklyn” by Betty Smith
  50. “East of Eden” by John Steinbeck
  51. “Alice in Wonderland” by Lewis Carroll
  52. “In Cold Blood” by Truman Capote
  53. “Catch-22” by Joseph Heller
  54. “The Stand” by Stephen King
  55. “Outlander” by Diana Gabaldon
  56. “Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban” by J.K. Rowling
  57. “Enders Game” by Orson Scott Card
  58. “Anna Karenina” by Leo Tolstoy
  59. “Watership Down” by Richard Adams
  60. “Memoirs of a Geisha” by Arthur Golden
  61. “Rebecca” by Daphne du Maurier
  62. “A Game of Thrones” by George R.R. Martin
  63. “Great Expectations” by Charles Dickens
  64. “The Old Man and the Sea” by Ernest Hemingway
  65. “The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes” (#3) by Arthur Conan Doyle
  66. “Les Misérables” by Victor Hugo
  67. “Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince” by J.K. Rowling
  68. “Life of Pi” by Yann Martel
  69. “The Scarlet Letter” by Nathaniel Hawthorne
  70. “Celebrating Silence: Excerpts from Five Years of Weekly Knowledge” by Sri Sri Ravi Shankar
  71. “The Chronicles of Narnia” by C.S. Lewis
  72. “The Pillars of the Earth” by Ken Follett
  73. “Catching Fire” by Suzanne Collins
  74. “Charlie and the Chocolate Factory” by Roald Dahl
  75. “Dracula” by Bram Stoker
  76. “The Princess Bride” by William Goldman
  77. “Water for Elephants” by Sara Gruen
  78. “The Raven” by Edgar Allan Poe
  79. “The Secret Life of Bees” by Sue Monk Kidd
  80. “The Poisonwood Bible: A Novel” by Barbara Kingsolver
  81. “One Hundred Years of Solitude” by Gabriel Garcí­a Márquez
  82. “The Time Traveler’s Wife” by Audrey Niffenegger
  83. “The Odyssey” by Homer
  84. “The Good Earth (House of Earth #1)” by Pearl S. Buck
  85. “Mockingjay (Hunger Games #3)” by Suzanne Collins
  86. “And Then There Were None” by Agatha Christie
  87. “The Thorn Birds” by Colleen McCullough
  88. “A Prayer for Owen Meany” by John Irving
  89. “The Glass Castle” by Jeannette Walls
  90. “The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks” by Rebecca Skloot
  91. “Crime and Punishment” by Fyodor Dostoyevsky
  92. “The Road” by Cormac McCarthy
  93. “The Things They Carried” by Tim O'Brien
  94. “Siddhartha” by Hermann Hesse
  95. “Beloved” by Toni Morrison
  96. “Slaughterhouse-Five” by Kurt Vonnegut
  97. “Cutting For Stone” by Abraham Verghese
  98. “The Phantom Tollbooth” by Norton Juster
  99. “The Brothers Karamazov” by Fyodor Dostoyevsky
  100. “The Story of My Life” by Helen Keller
6

“Did he have enemies?”
“Pick a number.”

Hey Everyone! When I was younger, I used to read a ton. As a direct result of that, my writing and reading were on point. Recently, however, I haven’t been reading as much, and as a result, my writing isn’t as good as I want it to be (albeit, still pretty good). I’ve decided to read all the books on this list over the next 1 and a half years to get back into reading and to improve my writing. Enjoy! :)

1. To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee

2. The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

3. Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen

4. Animal Farm by George Orwell

5. Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë

6. The Catcher in the Rye by JD Salinger

7. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain

8. Macbeth by William Shakespeare

9. Lord of the Flies by William Golding

10. Hamlet by William Shakespeare

11. Brave New World by Aldous Huxley

12. The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne

13. Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare

14. A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens

15. The Ecological Rift by John Bellamy Foster, Brett Clark, Richard York

16. This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs The Climate by Naomi Klein

17. Catch-22 by Joseph Heller

18. The Crucible by Arthur Miller

19. The Odyssey by Homer

20. The Red Badge of Courage by Stephen Crane

21. Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë

22. Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut

23. Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe

24. The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer 

25. The Stranger by Albert Camus

26. Frankenstein by Mary Shelly

27. The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck

28. Beowulf by Unknown

29. The Systems View of Life: A Unifying Vision by Fritjof Capra, Luigi Luisi

30. All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque

31. A Midsummer Night’s Dream by William Shakespeare

32. Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad

33. Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson

34. The Glass Menagerie by Tennessee Williams 

35. Faust: First Part by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

36. Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoyevsky

37. The Awakening by Kate Chopin

38. Candide by Voltaire

39. The Color Purple by Alice Walker

40. The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka

41. Oedipus Rex by Sophocles

42. Uncle Tom’s Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe

43. Steppenwolf by Hermann Hesse

44. One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn

45. The Bell Jar by Slyvia Plath

46. The Call of the Wild by Jack London

47. Walden by Henry David Thoreau

48. Antigone by Sophocles

49. Things Fall Apart (The African Trilogy, #1) by Chinua Achebe

50. Gulliver’s Travels by Jonathan Swift

51. The Last of the Mohicans (The Leatherstocking Tales #2) by James Fenimore Cooper

52. Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert

53. Beloved by Toni Morrison

54. Vanity Fair by William Makepeace Thackeray

55. Selected Tales by Edgar Allen Poe

56. Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury

57. 1984 by George Orwell

58. Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes 

59. The Sound and the Fury by William Faulkner

60. One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel García Márquez

61. The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde

62. A Good Man is Hard to Find and Other Stories by Flannery O’Connor

63. Pygmalion by George Bernard Shaw

64. As I Lay Dying by William Faulkner

65. Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison

66. The Three Musketeers by Alexandre Dumas

67. A Doll’s House by Henrik Ibsen

68. Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass by Frederick Douglass

69. Tess of the D’Urbervilles by Thomas Hardy

70. A Farewell to Arms by Ernest Hemingway

71. A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man by James Joyce

72. Waiting for Godot by Samuel Beckett

73. Moby-Dick; or, The Whale by Herman Melville

74. The Iliad by Homer

75. Inferno (The Divine Comedy #1) by Dante Alighieri

76. Babbitt by Sinclair Lewis

77. An American Tragedy by Theodore Dreiser 

78. The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling by Henry Fielding

79. Long Day’s Journey into Night by Eugene O’Neill

80. War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy

81. Cyrano de Bergac by Edmond Rostand

82. The Hunchback of Notre-Dame by Victor Hugo

83. The Mill on the Floss by George Elliot

84. The Cherry Orchard by Anton Chekhov

85. Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston

86. Bartleby the Scrivener by Herman Melville

87. Doctor Zhivago by Boris Pasternak

88. The House of Mirth by Edith Wharton

89. Selected Essays by Ralph Waldo Emerson

90. Leaves of Grass by Walt Whitman

91. The Good Soldier by Ford Madox Ford

92. Call it Sleep by Henry Roth

93. Fathers and Sons by Ivan Turgenev

94. The Portrait of a Lady by Henry James

95. The Adventures of Augie March by Saul Bellow

96. A Death in the Family by James Agee

97. The Turn of the Screw by Henry James

98. The Magic Mountain by Thomas Mann

99. Go Tell It on the Mountain by James Baldwin

100. Death Comes for the Archbishop by Willa Carther

101. To the Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf

Nerdy Fact #1875: In a few scenes of The Dark Knight Rises, Bane can be seen quietly knitting in the background. This is a reference to the main antagonist of Charles Dickens’ novel A Tale of Two Cities, who would knit as she watched public guillotine executions. Screenwriter Jonathan Nolan said the novel had a major influence on the film.

(Source.)

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2

On Princess Carolyn’s bookshelf:

A Tale of Two Kittens

Me Meow Pretty One Day

Romeow and Juliet

Purrity - Johnathan Franzen

Purrmese Days

Consider The Lobster - David Foster Wallace

The Big Book of Pajamas

The Color Purrple

Purrsepolis

https://www.reddit.com/r/BoJackHorseman/comments/4ud74q/the_books_on_princess_carolines_bookshelf/

Reddit link explaining the books

The Reader and the Writer (Part 4)

Originally posted by jugheadly

Part one here    Part two here    Part three here

Anon requests: Please tell me there’s going to be a part 4 to The Reader and the Writer. Its amazing!!

WHAT’S MY REAL NAME??? PART 4 4 4 4 4

THEY CALL ME Y/N, THEY CALL ME L/N THATS NOT MY NAME THATS NOT MY NAME PART FOURRRRRR PLSSSS 💜

Can you do a part four to reader and the writer?

PART 4 to reader and the writer omh it’s amazing

Pairing: Jughead x Reader

Description: A part in which we get to read what the writer has written, and we learn what happens to both the reader and the writer.

Warnings: none

Word count: 1,206

A/N: ok so this is gonna be a bit choppy at first because we’re just taking glimpses of Jughead’s writing, but bear with me here. I hope you guys like this part, enjoy!


Jason’s death had been announced a week ago.  Our small town was buzzing with the news, and right when things couldn’t get any more puzzling, a new girl arrived in Riverdale.  A new mystery to be solved.

She entered Pop’s for only a minute, and I heard an unfamiliar last name.  Is she involved in Jason’s murder?  Probably not, but strangers are always a good plot twist.

Three days later, I found this mystery in my booth reading Wuthering Heights.  Normally, I would kick her out, but because of my undying curiosity, I let her stay.  Maybe with her sitting across from me, I could learn where she fits in the story of Riverdale.  I had an enigma sitting right across from me and I didn’t even know it yet.

(Y/N).  Her name is (Y/N).


It’s difficult to notice because of her constant reading, but her eyes are like stained glass, tinting the morning light in a church.

She has a new book almost every day.  Today it was Emma

We haven’t spoken in three days.  She’s here, I’m here, but we haven’t spoken.  Although I crave to hear her voice, somehow I’m satisfied by this comforting silence.


Today it was To Kill a Mockingbird.  She asked if I read it, to which I replied yes.  I thought she’d begin a discussion, talk about the ghosts that occupied the small southern town, or the unjust prejudice people carry.  Instead, she smiled, nodded, and turned back to her book.

“Good,” she muttered under her breath.  I smiled.


What makes a person do foolish things?  Is it because of the flawed spontaneity of humans?  Or is it because maybe they were trying to impress someone?  I read A Tale of Two Cities last night.  As I read through the dull writing, I asked myself why I was reading literature that did not interest me.  I could not answer my own questions; all I know is that the next night in Pop’s, I subtly quoted the book during a conversation with (Y/N).  She was smiling for the rest of the night, and so was I.


I tried to tell her about my book.  She started talking about The English Patient.


When two worlds collide, do you praise the workers of fate for taking two dearly loved universes and combining them into one, or do you curse the forces of nature for creating such an impact?  Betty and Veronica met (Y/N), and a week later, so did Archie.


She was reading Macbeth that night. Our silence was comforting, but I wanted to talk to her more. I offered for her to help me with my book.  I wanted her to be a part of something that was important to me.  She refused and stormed out of the diner.  I didn’t know it then, but that would be the last time I saw (Y/N) (Y/L/N) in that light ever again.

After extensive research, I came to a shocking conclusion: (Y/N) (Y/L/N) is not a girl living in Riverdale in the 21st century. She is a writer from the 1700s, with four published works.  She is not the girl who has been sitting across from me in my booth for months.


One day after the truth: she isn’t here.  I called her, but she didn’t pick up.

Two days after our argument: I am in this booth alone.  I called her again.

Three days after she was reading Macbeth: she probably finished the book by now, but I wouldn’t know.  She isn’t here, and she still isn’t answering her phone.

It’s been a week.  She hasn’t returned, and my calls always go to voicemail.

Two weeks: Archie asked what’s wrong with me.  I said nothing, but my eyes didn’t leave the entrance of the diner. She didn’t come.

Three weeks later and Veronica and Betty checked on me.  They blabbered about what could be wrong, why I was brooding more than usual.  I didn’t reply, but my head perked up when they mentioned (Y/N).  They noticed.


She’s here.

She was born in Riverdale.

And so, a little light shined on the dark mystery of Riverdale’s (Y/N) (Y/L/N) like the calm before the storm.  The writer becomes the reader, the reader becomes the read. I found myself hooked on her just from a little information, like a drug addict craving his fix.  New girls can never hide in a small town like Riverdale, but God, I knew (Y/N), in all her enigmatic splendor, would lurk in the shadows of this town for as long as she possibly could.

As soon as she walked out of Pop’s that night, I told myself she would never return.  I told myself that she would probably leave Riverdale for good, and it’d be all because of me.  But lo and behold, 24 hours later, a familiar face entered my booth.

What is her name?

We haven’t spoken in two weeks; she’s still here, but we don’t talk.  Her real name remains a mystery to me.


A name. Everything is given a name, but a name does not define anything.  We call the number two so that we can define a value, but we could call two a horse and it would still have the same value.  I refer to (Y/N) as (Y/N), because that is the girl who sat across my booth.  That is the girl who I spent months developing a relationship with, and that is the girl I grew to love.

She told me her real name.  She said it with tears blurring her vision and a trembling lip, and when she choked it out I moved next to her and held her as she cried.  I enveloped her in a hug and I held her as all the sadness that she carried with her spilled out, and once it was all out of her system I wiped away her tears.  I kept holding her.  With a shaky voice she asked me why I was still there, why hadn’t I left?  I replied that I could never leave her. After all, I called her every night she was gone.

Then I told her I love her.

And she smiled, because I think deep down she knew.  She kissed me so softly, it felt like my lips were brushing up against flower petals.  I knew that was her way of telling me she loves me too.  We broke apart and I stared into her stained-glass eyes, and I remembered how it felt looking into them for the first time.  But this time was different.  Because now I knew the story behind those eyes, now I knew what those eyes have seen, and now I knew what emotions those eyes hid.

Now I know.

I whispered in her ear, my lips barely brushing against her skin, and told her I would call her by the name I knew her by.  I would call her (Y/N) (Y/L/N) because that is the girl I fell in love with, and that is the girl I want to continue to love.  She was no longer the enigma sitting across from me, nor was she the strange new girl in Riverdale.

Her name is (Y/N), and she is the girl I love.