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How Hydroponics Could Revolutionize Farming in Africa
Hydroponic farming, which uses minerals instead of soil to grow plants, is starting to take root in Africa. Bloomberg meets one of the Kenya-based pioneers of the technology who believes the technique will revolutionise farming on the continent.

How Hydroponics Could Revolutionize Farming in Africa

Hydroponic farming, which uses minerals instead of soil to grow plants, is starting to take root in Africa. Bloomberg meets one of the Kenya-based pioneers of the technology who believes the technique will revolutionise farming on the continent.

FBI is investigating US companies who fight back against hackers

In another case of the Federal Government running things exactly backwards of how they should be, instead of empowering companies who fall victim to hackers to fight back, the FBI is actually launching criminal investigations into those firms that don’t just roll over and take it.

from Bloomberg:

U.S. officials have shown little appetite to intervene as banks, retailers, casinos, power companies and manufacturers have been targeted by foreign-based hackers. Private-sector companies doing business in the U.S. have few clear options for striking back on their own.

That has led a growing number of companies to push the limits of existing law to consider ways to break into hackers’ networks to retrieve stolen data or even knock computers offline to stop attacks, the cybersecurity professionals said in interviews. Some companies are enlisting cybersecurity firms, many with military or government security ties, to walk them through options for disrupting hacker operations or peering into foreign networks to find out what intellectual property hackers may have stolen.

In one case, the Federal Bureau of Investigation is looking into whether hackers working on behalf of any U.S. financial institutions disabled servers that were being used by Iran to attack the websites of major banks last year, said two people familiar with the investigation. JPMorgan Chase & Co. advocated such a move in a closed meeting in February 2013, these people said. A bank spokeswoman said no action was ever taken. Federal investigators are still trying to determine who was responsible, the people said.

[…]

In the U.S., companies are prohibited by the 30-year-old Computer Fraud and Abuse Act from gaining unauthorized access to computers or overloading them with digital demands, even to stop an ongoing attack.

The act exempts intelligence and law-enforcement activities, allowing the government to respond more aggressively than private-sector firms. There’s little indication, though, that military and intelligence agencies have used their most powerful tools to shut down attacks on businesses, as the U.S. has attempted to address foreign-based hacking through diplomacy and the courts.

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How ridiculous can you get?  Hacking costs the US economy an estimated $575 billion each year, and the Federal government is demanding that US businesses fight with both hands tied behind their backs. 

Wise choice by Michael Bloomberg

Former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg announced on Monday that he will not mount a presidential run this year, saying he doesn’t want to pave the way for Donald Trump or Ted Cruz to win the White House.

“As the race stands now, with Republicans in charge of both Houses, there is a good chance that my candidacy could lead to the election of Donald Trump or Senator Ted Cruz. That is not a risk I can take in good conscience,” Bloomberg said in an editorial written for Bloomberg View.

“We cannot ‘make America great again’ by turning our backs on the values that made us the world’s greatest nation in the first place. I love our country too much to play a role in electing a candidate who would weaken our unity and darken our future – and so I will not enter the race for president of the United States.”