Hindi ko maintindihan sa mga pinoy kung kailan dapat tayo nagkakaisa dun pa tayo nagkakanya-kanya.

Hindi mo maintindihan ‘yung nga gusto nila sa buhay. Hindi man tumulong o nakarating agad ang presidente masama na ang dating niya sa tao pero once na tumulong siya, masama pa rin. Minsan ‘yung pagtulong mo talaga hindi na nga appreciated ang sama pa ng dating. Haaayy pinas.

Tapos may mga tao pang tweet ng tweet, status ng status,tapos may balita pa na nagrally samanatalang hindi muna nagbabasa ng mga balita.

Minsan gamitin natin ang social sites para magtulong tulong hindi para manira ng kapwa na walang ibang hinangad kundi protektahan tayo.

Ganun talaga

“ganun talaga”

Words ng mga taong wala ng nagawa, ginagawa at magagawa sa isang sitwasyon.

example:

a. Hindi ka na mahal ng partner mo.

Answer: Wala na kong magagawa sa nararamdaman niya. Ganun talaga eh.

b. Against ka at hindi ka masaya sa policy ng company mo.

Answer: Kailangan kong respetuhin ang company at ang clients namin kahit pagod na pagod na ako. Kahit sobrang dedicated na ako. Wala pa din. Ganun talaga eh.

c. Sabi ng Boss mo, you need to improve pa para ma consider ka sa promotion.

Answer: Bes, kuba na ko, sinakop na ng eyebags ang mata ko. Nag iiba na attitude ko dahil sa pagod at expectations na hindi mo maintindihan. Gusto mo bang gawin ko pati trabaho ni Manong sekyu na nag cacandy crush at mobile legends sa lobby? Pero siyempre, GO BACK TO LETTER B. WALA NA KONG MAGAGAWA. GANUN TALAGA EH.

clingy and annoying doesn’t bother me when it’s from the right person, i literally do not mind if my boyfriend sends me a picture of a car he likes at 3am even if I’m not really into cars, his first thought was ‘i know imma send that to my girlfriend’ and yes i love that shit

2

I was gonna make a masterpost for Filipino/Tagalog but there’s not a lot of resources online so I decided to make graphics here instead! I’ll make more in the future but here are just some common words/phrases in the language. Filipino has a lot of borrowed words from Spanish and English due to colonialism and most of the time it’s difficult to say a complete sentence in Filipino alone because English words are deeply mixed into the language, hence Taglish. It’s a norm to switch between English and Filipino midsentence or even midword. There’s no Filipino translation for hi/hello so we just use them instead. We also use English phrases like ‘happy birthday’ and ‘excuse me’ more commonly than their Filipino translations. I lived in the Philippines for 12 years and I’m fluent so if you guys are learning Filipino or have any questions feel free to approach me!

10

The Tagalog Pantheon (Part I/2) 

The Tagalog pantheon consisted of many gods and goddesses adhering to various elements of nature and activities. They believed that the earth, sky, sea, and all living things were created by one god who was referred to by two names, Bathala Maykapal & Molyari/Malyari, “the creator and preserver of all things”. Under him were a number of different deities that served him and were directly prayed to by the ancient Tagalog, each with their own different responsibilities. There was Haik, the god of the sea, who they performed sacrifices of banquets and food asking him to protect voyagers out to sea from storms, granting them good weather and favorable winds. Then there was the goddess Idiyanale, the goddess of agriculture, who overlooked all activities of raising crops and animals. Aman Sinaya was the god who invented the art of fishing and was called upon by fishermen when casting their nets or preparing their fishhooks. The sisters Hanan, the goddess of the morning, and Tala, the goddess of the stars and the bright star, Venus. Laho, the naga deity who devoured the moon and sun, causing solar and lunar eclipses. People would scare Laho away by playing loud music and banging pots and gongs to free the sun and moon from the god. Mankukuktod was the god who protected coconut palms and was given offerings by tuba (a coconut alcoholic drink) tappers who wanted to climb up the tree to get the coconuts or else risk falling from the trunk of the tree. Then there was the god of hunters, Aman Ikabli, who the Tagalogs worshiped to help provide game such as deer and wild boars. Offerings of food were given to the god of the forests and fields, Uwinan Sana, who the Tagalogs prayed to when they passed through his domains, asking his permission to walk through and to not cause them harm as they do. These anito were only a handful of the old gods and goddesses the ancestors of the Tagalogs once worshiped and revered. The second half of the Tagalog pantheon will be in part two.

A guide to pretending you speak Tagalog/Filipino

1. Add “’di ba?” (right?/innit?) to the end of your sentences.

2. Replace “really”/”very” with “talagang” or the question “Really?” with “talaga.”

3. Sprinkle a dash of “kasi” (because, or the “that’s why” that you add to the end of a sentence instead of saying “because.”)

You didn’t ask for directions, that’s why kasi.


4. Use Google Translate to find the most obscure word for what you’re trying to say. Deep Tagalog points.

You’re hair is so marilag and maluwalhati today.

another list of untranslatable words ☕️

fernweh - german: longing for far-off places; feeling homesick for a place you have never been to
siping - filipino: the tender act of lying beside someone
wabi-sabi (侘寂) - japanese: concept in traditional Japanese aesthetics, world view centered on the acceptance of the natural cycle of growth and decay
gökotta - swedish: waking up early in the morning to go out to hear the birds sing
aware (哀れ) - japanese: from the phrase “mono no aware” which translates to “a sensitivity to ephemera”; the impermanence of moments of transcendent beauty
kyōiku mama (教育ママ) - japanese: a stereotyped figure in modern Japanese society portrayed as a mother who pushes her children into academic achievements
muditā - sanskrit: the pleasure that comes from delighting in other people’s well-being and happiness
torschlusspanik - german: literally “gate-closing panic”; refers to the fear of diminishing opportunities as one ages
ichigo ichie (一期一会) - japanese: idiom that describes a cultural concept of treasuring gatherings with people; a reminder to cherish moments and meetings with people because they can never be replicated; each moment is always once in a lifetime
saudade - portuguese: the bittersweet feeling of longing for or missing something or someone that you love and which or who is lost
dapjeongneo (답정너) - korean: when somebody has already decided the answer they want to hear after asking a question and are waiting for you to say that exact answer
aranyhíd - hungarian: literally “golden bridge”; defined as the glistening reflection of the sun on the ocean
kyōka suigetsu (鏡花水月) - chinese: literally means “Mirror Flower, Water Moon”; a visible entity that cannot be touched or grasped, like a flower reflected in a mirror or the moon reflected on the water’s surface
yoko meshi (横飯) - japanese: literal meaning “a meal eaten sideways”; used to describe the stress of speaking a foreign language
uitwaaien - dutch: literally to walk with the wind; the act of walking outside in the fresh air to clear one’s head
sprezzatura - italian: to make whatever one does or says appear to be effortless, studied carelessness; form of defensive irony
(h)onne (本音) - japanese: more common with tatemae (建前); the contrast between a person’s true feelings and desires that are often kept hidden, except with one’s closest friends (本音) and the socially acceptable behavior and opinions one displays in public (建前)
guanxi (关系) - chinese: a central idea in the Chinese business society; the ways of getting things done by doing favours - “once a favour is done, an unspoken obligation exists, [so] people often try to refuse gifts, because, sooner or later, they may have to repay the debt”
meraki (μεράκι) - greek: doing something with passion, absolute devotion and attention, with soul and love; when you put something of yourself into what you’re doing
pena ajena - (mexican) spanish: the embarrassment you feel because of the actions of others or someone else’s humiliation; second-hand embarrassment

list no.1

saetr3noora  asked:

hello! meron ka bang complete/accurate list of all the deities from the tagalog and bisayan pantheon? Also, i'm sorry if this question has been asked before ngayon ko lang nahanap blog mo and i'm only now really getting into ph mythology :)

Hi @saetr3noora​. I made one before though I don’t remember which blog I posted it in, this one, or my blog on reviving our old beliefs, practices, and on our general mythologies and folklore at @diwatahan​. Also its an old list that needed to be updated and corrected so I guess it gives me an opportunity to make another one. :)

But here is my complete list on them based on historical research, not modern takes on it. This list is from my notes for my book I am still currently writing and researching for. Any modern deities from recent stories such as Lidaga, Lihangin, Lisuga, etc. are not included on this list as there is not one mention of them in any of the oldest dictionaries or in any historical record accept in the 1900′s particularly during the U.S. colonial period and after and thus based on historical research, they weren’t traditionally worshiped. However this doesn’t mean they aren’t deities as some may just be but never mentioned in historical texts and only known orally, but for the purpose of listing all the deities that were believed and worshiped prior to the Spaniards I have excluded them from the list. I try to put info on each deity as much as possible based on what was written on them but there are a few who are only briefly mentioned in passing either with just the name of the deity alone or the name and the attribute they were known for.

Also note there are other Bisayan deities not listed here that are known to the Sulod of Panay island with the exception of Laon Sina/Alunsina as she was a prominent goddess known throughout the Bisayas. The deities known by the Sulod may possibly be deities that were known by the other ethnic groups in the West Bisayas and elsewhere in the region under different names locally but I have not looked into that intensively and done enough research on that subject so I have left those deities out of this list.

This is a pretty long list so I have cut it off here for those who don’t want to scroll so much on their dash. To read the entire list just press keep reading. 

Anyway I hope this helps all those who are interested in our mythologies and folklore, whether from mere curiosity, for the sake of creating art, or to actually join the movement of reviving our precolonial beliefs and practices to the modern day.

Keep reading