tactical rope

Januwormy Entry #1

#???, Peripod | Greasy | Slime Rope Pokémon
#???, Velvigon | Greasy/Dragon | Slime Rope Pokémon

Okay so I’m a bit late on this challenge from @aviculor, which is unfortunate because now the punny name is lost (I guess this is Febuwormy now???), but hey! I finally made a Fakemon after a 2 month hiatus!

Period and Velvigon are my first members of the Greasy type (created by @seizurecube​, of @seizurecubes-fakemon​), a very much needed addition to the lore of the region. True to their species name, their signature hunting tactics involve firing ropes of thick slime from their antennae, capable of immobilizing even the fastest of prey (usually small mammals).

Now to introduce the real life basis of these two ‘mon, the Velvet Worm! Much like their Fakemon counterparts, they hunt with slime, and just LOOK HOW CUTE THEY ARE. 

(((A new type, AND another unconventional dragon? This is the most manticr0n-style return I could possibly make)))

-T

Six Things Freelance Writing Taught Me

For cash-strapped writers – which, let’s be honest, is most of us – freelancing is a means of making ends meet while doing what we love most: writing. But more than that, working as a gun for hire also serves as an awesome tactic to learn the ropes and pick up things like:

1. How to sell a pitch. Landing a freelance writing gig is like submitting a novel. You have to stand out from the rabble – which means crafting a clever cover letter. Something tight and professional (but not boring, boredom is the Black Plague of queries) which showcases your writing savvy. After hundreds of hours trawling through online classifieds and shooting off queries, I’ve got the CV thing down to a freaking science. That said, the tweaking and tuning never ends.

2. How to research. Since freelancers write across fields and professions, research skills are a stamped, signed and sealed must. It can also be kind of fun. For instance, a while back, I landed a gig writing targeted Tweets for a floating real estate honcho. I ended up submerged in a crap ton of did-you-knows about aquatic living, and to this day, I know more about float homes than most people are ever exposed to.

3. How to keep it sharp. Most writing projects have a word limit. For instance, I shoot for 1000 words when it comes to newsletters, and about 500 for articles. For Tweets, it’s even less: 140 characters. That means making each sentence count. The flip side of this is that I’ve been kind of stunted. I can crank out short stories and novellas fine, but I struggle with length. So just be careful about that. Believe me. Nothing more frustrating than plotting out a 50k novel just to top out at 20k.

4. How to self-edit. Kind of obvious, but freelancers have to polish their own stuff. Sometimes, clients will make little changes, but the writer must know their way about the grammar-go-round. No one’s going to hire a freelancer if their writing sample is chock-full of more holes than a slice of Swiss cheese.

5. How to stick to a deadline. Deadlines are super important. Ever finished an assignment the night before it’s due? When there’s an immediate cut-off, there’s no time to wait for inspiration to beam down from the heavens. We don’t have a choice but to take matters into our own hands – and that’s when the magic happens.

6. How to treat writing like the serious profession it is. Like accountants, freelancers exist in the frame of mind where writing is our livelihood. Once that mental shift occurs, writing becomes a hell of a lot easier. It’s not just a catharsis. It’s a career. And that’s what it’s all about.

Combat controllers from the 21st Special Tactics Squadron fast-rope from a CV-22 Osprey during Emerald Warrior near Hurlburt Field, Fla., April 21, 2015. Emerald Warrior is the Department of Defense’s only irregular warfare exercise, allowing joint and combined partners to train together and prepare for real-world contingency operations. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Jonathan Snyder)