tacoma narrows

7

Science Busts The Biggest Myth Ever About Why Bridges Collapse

“Just four months later, under the right wind conditions, the bridge was driven at its resonant frequency, causing it to oscillate and twist uncontrollably. After undulating for over an hour, the middle section collapsed, and the bridge was destroyed. It was a testimony to the power of resonance, and has been used as a classic example in physics and engineering classes across the country ever since. Unfortunately, the story is a complete myth.”

If you’ve only ever seen one bridge collapse ever, it was probably the Tacoma Narrows Bridge. On November 7th, 1940, high, sustained winds sent the bridge from an up-and-down undulation into a twisting, rocking pattern that led to the eventual collapse of the structure. It’s been used as a classic example of resonance at work, similar to how a wine glass will shatter when exposed to the right frequency pitch. While the shattering of glass is due to resonance, and it is a real phenomenon, the numbers just don’t add up for the bridge. Instead, it’s a much more intricate phenomenon that caused that infamous bridge collapse, known as flutter. If you’ve heard the resonance explanation, you’re not alone: it’s probably the most common misconception in all of physics and engineering!

Don’t be fooled any longer. Come get the full – and correct – story today!

flickr

Orca 12/20/14 by Mike Charest
Via Flickr:
Tacoma, Washington, Tacoma Narrows Under the Narrows Bridge, Nine total on the Tacoma Christmas Bird Count

engineering school gothic
  • you are in three classes that use bernoulli’s equation. none of the equations are the same. your teachers do not know who bernoulli is. did bernoulli even exist?
  • there is a problem set. it is not on the syllabus. the first question is a blank page. you look through the whole set. it is all blank, except for the last page. you think it says “run”. you do not know. it is not written in binary.
  • this is an ethics class. you are not sure why you are here. you do not need ethics. you have never needed ethics. “it’s a joke class,” whispers an upperclassman. you do not understand why it is funny.
  • abet. the name echoes through the halls of the mechanical engineering building. no one knows what it means.
  • you are studying the tacoma narrows bridge for the fifth time. your differential equations professor tells you it is not an example of resonance. your engineering professor tells you it is. you are not sure who to trust.
  • there are six bernoullis. only four of them are related. they all look the same.
  • the environmental science majors have to take a class to learn excel. you do not understand. you have always known excel, haven’t you? you do not remember learning it.
  • you solve a triple integral and stop, confused. it has become a ricotti equation. you have forgotten ohm’s law.
  • euler has done everything. there is a portrait of euler in the english building. when you look into its eyes, something disturbs you on a visceral level.
  • you know so many languages: java, javascript, doubt, python, c++, R, matlab, uncertainty, ruby, html, confusion, terror,
  • your professor cancels class. you suspect a trick. when you arrive to the classroom, your entire class is there, watching the empty space where the professor should be. no one speaks. no one leaves.
  • the problem set is optional. the problem set is not optional. the problem set is about schrodinger’s law.
  • three different people have explained mechatronics to you. nobody knows what it is.
  • your friend says they have essays to write. essays? you cannot remember what a word document looks like. you have not written a paragraph in two years. words are abstract concepts without meaning.
  • “you’re an engineer?” someone asks. “you must be smart.” you begin to laugh. you have them all fooled. you cannot stop laughing.
  • no one is sure what systems engineering is. the lights in the systems building are always on. you have never seen someone come out.
  • your professors all do research. there are bloodstains on their lecture notes. you do not ask what they research. the last person to ask vanished at the start of the semester. your computer science professor hasn’t stopped smiling since.
  • when you attend career fairs, you are surrounded by students you have never seen and companies you have never heard of. “we’re an innovative start-up,” someone says. “we’re an innovative start-up,” you hear echoed down the hall three weeks later. the words have not stopped. you cannot sleep. you are an innovative start-up. 

cauldronofmorning  asked:

For the art request meme, can I have Rebecca/Tacoma kissing? They were going to be a couple in later seasons and I still feel cheated.

They were? I didn’t know that. (Yet another reason why the fact that later seasons aren’t actually going to be a thing kinda sucks.)

Anyway, you absolutley can! Tacoma’s face looks kind of… not like Tacoma’s face, sorry. >_< But, I hope you like it!

(I don’t know how anatomy works - a novel by tumblr user zewhomustnotbenamed.)

Took this driving home tonight.
Tacoma Narrows Bridge, Washington.

The air was warm, folk music was playing through my speakers and escaping out my windows, and I was completely mesmerized at the state that I have called my own for so many years. This moment was poetry in motion.

4

On 7 November, 1940 at around 11am, only a few months after it was first opened, the Tacoma Narrows Bridge in Washington collapsed in a rather spectacular way. At around 10am, winds at 40mph (~65km/h) caused the bridge, which was built out of cement and steel, to sway up and down. This was due to the special design of the bridge, which didn’t let winds simply pass through, but diverted them above and below the structure at different pressures, similar to an airplane wing. The torsional oscillation strained the suspender cables to the point that they failed, which led to the collapse of the center part of the bridge. In the past, the bridge had swayed even at much milder winds, just not that violently.

People abandoned the bridge quickly, however there was a dog in a parked car left behind. As you can see in the second gif (if you look closely), a man tried to reach the car to save the animal, but by that time, it was nearly impossible to walk on the bridge, so he returned. The dog, a Cocker Spaniel called Tubby, was the only fatality.

250 THINGS AN ARCHITECT SHOULD KNOW - MICHAEL SORKIN

1.    The feel of cool marble under bare feet.
2.    How to live in a small room with five strangers for six months.
3.    With the same strangers in a lifeboat for one week.
4.    The modulus of rupture.
5.    The distance a shout carries in the city.
6.    The distance of a whisper.
7.    Everything possible about Hatshepsut’s temple (try not to see it as ‘modernist’ avant la lettre).
8.    The number of people with rent subsidies in New York City.
9.    In your town (include the rich).
10.    The flowering season for azaleas.
11.    The insulating properties of glass.
12.    The history of its production and use.
13.    And of its meaning.
14.    How to lay bricks.
15.    What Victor Hugo really meant by ‘this will kill that.’
16.    The rate at which the seas are rising.
17.    Building information modeling (BIM).
18.    How to unclog a rapidograph.
19.    The Gini coefficient.
20.    A comfortable tread-to-riser ratio for a six-year-old.
21.    In a wheelchair.
22.    The energy embodied in aluminum.
23.    How to turn a corner.
24.    How to design a corner.
25.    How to sit in a corner.
26.    How Antoni Gaudí modeled the Sagrada Família and calculated its structure.
27.    The proportioning system for the Villa Rotonda.
28.    The rate at which that carpet you specified off-gasses.
29.    The relevant sections of the Code of Hammurabi.
30.    The migratory patterns of warblers and other seasonal travellers.
31.    The basics of mud construction.
32.    The direction of prevailing winds.
33.    Hydrology is destiny.
34.    Jane Jacobs in and out.
35.    Something about feng shui.
36.    Something about Vastu Shilpa.
37.    Elementary ergonomics.
38.    The color wheel.
39.    What the client wants.
40.    What the client thinks it wants.
41.    What the client needs.
42.    What the client can afford.
43.    What the planet can afford.
44.    The theoretical bases for modernity and a great deal about its factions and inflections.
45.    What post-Fordism means for the mode of production of building.
46.    Another language.
47.    What the brick really wants.
48.    The difference between Winchester Cathedral and a bicycle shed.
49.    What went wrong in Fatehpur Sikri.
50.    What went wrong in Pruitt-Igoe.
51.    What went wrong with the Tacoma Narrows Bridge.
52.    Where the CCTV cameras are.
53.    Why Mies really left Germany.
54.    How people lived in Çatal Hüyük.
55.    The structural properties of tufa.
56.    How to calculate the dimensions of brise-soleil.
57.    The kilowatt costs of photovoltaic cells.
58.    Vitruvius.
59.    Walter Benjamin.
60.    Marshall Berman.
61.    The secrets of the success of Robert Moses.
62.    How the dome on the Duomo in Florence was built.
63.    The reciprocal influences of Chinese and Japanese building.
64.    The cycle of the Ise Shrine.
65.    Entasis.
66.    The history of Soweto.
67.    What it’s like to walk down the Ramblas.
68.    Back-up.
69.    The proper proportions of a gin martini.
70.    Shear and moment.
71.    Shakespeare, etc.
72.    How the crow flies.
73.    The difference between a ghetto and a neighborhood.
74.    How the pyramids were built.
75.    Why.
76.    The pleasures of the suburbs.
77.    The horrors.
78.    The quality of light passing through ice.
79.    The meaninglessness of borders.
80.    The reasons for their tenacity.
81.    The creativity of the ecotone.
82.    The need for freaks.
83.    Accidents must happen.
84.    It is possible to begin designing anywhere.
85.    The smell of concrete after rain.
86.    The angle of the sun at the equinox.
87.    How to ride a bicycle.
88.    The depth of the aquifer beneath you.
89.    The slope of a handicapped ramp.
90.    The wages of construction workers.
91.    Perspective by hand.
92.    Sentence structure.
93.    The pleasure of a spritz at sunset at a table by the Grand Canal.
94.    The thrill of the ride.
95.    Where materials come from.
96.    How to get lost.
97.    The pattern of artificial light at night, seen from space.
98.    What human differences are defensible in practice.
99.    Creation is a patient search.
100.    The debate between Otto Wagner and Camillo Sitte.
101.    The reasons for the split between architecture and engineering.
102.    Many ideas about what constitutes utopia.
103.    The social and formal organization of the villages of the Dogon.
104.    Brutalism, Bowellism, and the Baroque.
105.    How to derive.
106.    Woodshop safety.
107.    A great deal about the Gothic.
108.    The architectural impact of colonialism on the cities of North Africa.
109.    A distaste for imperialism.
110.    The history of Beijing.
111.    Dutch domestic architecture in the 17th century.
112.    Aristotle’s Politics.
113.    His Poetics.
114.    The basics of wattle and daub.
115.    The origins of the balloon frame.
116.    The rate at which copper acquires its patina.
117.    The levels of particulates in the air of Tianjin.
118.    The capacity of white pine trees to sequester carbon.
119.    Where else to sink it.
120.    The fire code.
121.    The seismic code.
122.    The health code.
123.    The Romantics, throughout the arts and philosophy.
124.    How to listen closely.
125.    That there is a big danger in working in a single medium. The logjam you don’t even know you’re stuck in will be broken by a shift in representation.
126.    The exquisite corpse.
127.    Scissors, stone, paper.
128.    Good Bordeaux.
129.    Good beer.
130.    How to escape a maze.
131.    QWERTY.
132.    Fear.
133.    Finding your way around Prague, Fez, Shanghai, Johannesburg, Kyoto, Rio, Mexico, Solo, Benares, Bangkok, Leningrad, Isfahan.
134.    The proper way to behave with interns.
135.    Maya, Revit, Catia, whatever.
136.    The history of big machines, including those that can fly.
137.    How to calculate ecological footprints.
138.    Three good lunch spots within walking distance.
139.    The value of human life.
140.    Who pays.
141.    Who profits.
142.    The Venturi effect.
143.    How people pee.
144.    What to refuse to do, even for the money.
145.    The fine print in the contract.
146.    A smattering of naval architecture.
147.    The idea of too far.
148.    The idea of too close.
149.    Burial practices in a wide range of cultures.
150.    The density needed to support a pharmacy.
151.    The density needed to support a subway.
152.    The effect of the design of your city on food miles for fresh produce.
153.    Lewis Mumford and Patrick Geddes.
154.    Capability Brown, André Le Nôtre, Frederick Law Olmsted, Muso Soseki, Ji Cheng, and Roberto Burle Marx.
155.    Constructivism, in and out.
156.    Sinan.
157.    Squatter settlements via visits and conversations with residents.
158.    The history and techniques of architectural representation across cultures.
159.    Several other artistic media.
160.    A bit of chemistry and physics.
161.    Geodesics.
162.    Geodetics.
163.    Geomorphology.
164.    Geography.
165.    The Law of the Andes.
166.    Cappadocia first-hand.
167.    The importance of the Amazon.
168.    How to patch leaks.
169.    What makes you happy.
170.    The components of a comfortable environment for sleep.
171.    The view from the Acropolis.
172.    The way to Santa Fe.
173.    The Seven Wonders of the Ancient World.
174.    Where to eat in Brooklyn.
175.    Half as much as a London cabbie.
176.    The Nolli Plan.
177.    The Cerdà Plan.
178.    The Haussmann Plan.
179.    Slope analysis.
180.    Darkroom procedures and Photoshop.
181.    Dawn breaking after a bender.
182.    Styles of genealogy and taxonomy.
183.    Betty Friedan.
184.    Guy Debord.
185.    Ant Farm.
186.    Archigram.
187.    Club Med.
188.    Crepuscule in Dharamshala.
189.    Solid geometry.
190.    Strengths of materials (if only intuitively).
191.    Ha Long Bay.
192.    What’s been accomplished in Medellín.
193.    In Rio.
194.    In Calcutta.
195.    In Curitiba.
196.    In Mumbai.
197.    Who practices? (It is your duty to secure this space for all who want to.)
198.    Why you think architecture does any good.
199.    The depreciation cycle.
200.    What rusts.
201.    Good model-making techniques in wood and cardboard.
202.    How to play a musical instrument.
203.    Which way the wind blows.
204.    The acoustical properties of trees and shrubs.
205.    How to guard a house from floods.
206.    The connection between the Suprematists and Zaha.
207.    The connection between Oscar Niemeyer and Zaha.
208.    Where north (or south) is.
209.    How to give directions, efficiently and courteously.
210.    Stadtluft macht frei.
211.    Underneath the pavement the beach.
212.    Underneath the beach the pavement.
213.    The germ theory of disease.
214.    The importance of vitamin D.
215.    How close is too close.
216.    The capacity of a bioswale to recharge the aquifer.
217.    The draught of ferries.
218.    Bicycle safety and etiquette.
219.    The difference between gabions and riprap.
220.    The acoustic performance of Boston Symphony Hall.
221.    How to open the window.
222.    The diameter of the earth.
223.    The number of gallons of water used in a shower.
224.    The distance at which you can recognize faces.
225.    How and when to bribe public officials (for the greater good).
226.    Concrete finishes.
227.    Brick bonds.
228.    The Housing Question by Friedrich Engels.
229.    The prismatic charms of Greek island towns.
230.    The energy potential of the wind.
231.    The cooling potential of the wind, including the use of chimneys and the stack effect.
232.    Paestum.
233.    Straw-bale building technology.
234.    Rachel Carson.
235.    Freud.
236.    The excellence of Michel de Klerk.
237.    Of Alvar Aalto.
238.    Of Lina Bo Bardi.
239.    The non-pharmacological components of a good club.
240.    Mesa Verde National Park.
241.    Chichen Itza.
242.    Your neighbors.
243.    The dimensions and proper orientation of sports fields.
244.    The remediation capacity of wetlands.
245.    The capacity of wetlands to attenuate storm surges.
246.    How to cut a truly elegant section.
247.    The depths of desire.
248.    The heights of folly.
249.    Low tide.
250.    The Golden and other ratios.

(Let Me Be Your Last) First

I’ve mentioned in fic before that Satya & Mei seem like a perfect couple to Angela so… lmao here I am putting my money where my mouth is and writing them.  Seriously though I love them as a pairing & they need more attention.

Crossposted to AO3.

They have met, time and again, by name and by reputation, as coworkers, as people, and as friends, and now, they find themselves meeting in a way which is entirely new.

Or,

Through a series of introductions, Satya and Mei find themselves, and one another.

Rating: G

Warnings: N/A

Words: 3k+

Categories: Mei/Satya

Series: Plighted Hands verse

Keep reading

2

Gray skies, mist in the air, and dripping leaves made this a typical PNW spring run. I spent this 4 miles pondering training runs to come. I’ve used a plan before that I liked that I’ve decided to use again for the fall half. I’ll pare it down a bit as it’s meant for intermediate runners, and while I’m not a beginner, I’m not in running condition to be at this level. I wasn’t the first time I used it either. I didn’t know that the plan was more advanced than I was until I spoke to someone at a local running store, who is a competitive runner, and she enlightened me to the fact that I was doing more advanced training runs. Oops, worked for me anyway.

I love the challenge, and anxiety, of doing tempo and interval runs. Going out to run with the uncertainty of being able to hold a faster pace for x long keeps me interested in the run. The difficulty makes it fun….. just a little sick to enjoy doing intervals at a 5k pace. For me, tempo runs are all about building confidence that my body can actually do what I want it, or will it, to do. Powerful feeling.

This mornings run included 6x30 second fartleks. I had to convince myself mid-run to do them, sometimes I forget that I actually like them until I’m done. Maybe that’s the fun part…. being done and knowing you accomplished what you set out to. Maybe just being done is the fun part.

I’m thinking that instead of only doing the half in September, I’ll register for the Tacoma Narrows half in August. Otherwise I wouldn’t start my 12 week training plan for a month and that feels too far away. I also want to do the Lake Powell half out of Page, AZ, in October but my running buddy can’t travel then.😔

Is anyone else going to do the Lake Powell half? Vacation running is the best! I could go to the Grand Canyon while I’m there!

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I still can’t believe they actually let people drive on that.