tablets of stone

i also have a headcanon that when Hana meets Pharah for the first time she points to her tattoo and is like “oh! the eye of Horus!” and Pharah’s impressed, like “Wow most people I meet don’t know what it’s called” and Hana starts sweatin because she learned it during her Yu-Gi-Oh! phase

anonymous asked:

Do you have a list of town theme ideas?

forest towns -

fairy forest - filled with mushrooms and jacob ladders and even weeds for a overgrown natural look, scatter ores about the town and use pwps like the stone tablet and the statue fountain

woodland forest - filled with mushroom, lots of flowers, stumps and dead trees. use wooden bridges, and picnic blanket qr’s on the ground and use pwps like water wells and streetlights

dark/forbidden forest - harry potter style, you could have your characters based on mythical creatures  centaurs, grawp the giant, or non harry potter themed mythical creatures. 

witch/fairy town - 

each house belonging to a different sort of witch/fairy and themed to relate to them. lots of ores around town and fairy rings. i found purple and black flowers give off a really nice mythical vibe in burrow.

farm town -

using pwps like the scarecrow and the windmill, more open space, red roofs on your houses with matching red flowers, turnips about town and there’s many qr codes with growing crops on (writing this am like woah i wana make tht)

national park town - 

defined paths with bench pwps lining them, garbage can pwps and street lamps. i’d have villagers set off to one side of the town in a village set up, a park area with jungle gym and lots of picnic blanket qr codes laid about. 

horror town -

with dead trees, black flowers and wilted flowers, custom design signs with warning signs on

halloween town - 

orange and black themed town, villagers like kiki, bella, cherry, pietro and stinky would be great for a town like this.

gothic town -

black and wilted flowers, dead trees. again bella and cherry would be good villagers for this style of town.

winter towns -

christmas town - snowy, red flowers, presents scattered around town, santa’s workshop, elfs house with the attic filled with lots of beds .

frozen over town - white and blue flowers, illuminated pwps, everything icy and white. fountains would look really cute in this town set up with blue flowers.

colour themed town -

eg. pink town with pink flowers, pink villagers, pink houses

all one type of villager town -

eg, all frogs and have a pond themed town. (if you can map edit, make sure you have lots of little ponds!)

pastel town -

pick cutesie villagers with pastel house exteriors, some of the new amiibo villagers will be perfect for this. 

seaside/beach town -

houses themed on beach huts, tropical bushes and bright coloured flowers or alternative blue and white nautical theme

holiday resort town - 

if you have hacks you can put palm trees on land, also using the island bushes (i have forgotten their names but the big colourful flowery ones) have the houses set out like cute little holiday villas and the villagers all wearing hawaiian shirts.  

disney town - 

4 different disney princesses with houses that match their stories. e.g. snow white with the 7 dwarfs house and all their little beds. 

future town -

ribbot would be great for this. 

ancient egyptian town - 

with ankha and lucky, using the pyramid pwp.

underwater themed town -

hack the ground to be desert like sand, have lots of shells around. the octopus villagers would word great for this. alternatively a little mermaid themed town with ariel and ursula as characters. 

old fashioned town - 

based on a certain era e.g. tudors or victorian times. 

town based on a movie - 

disney movies, harry potter, grease, the addams family, the wizard of oz. there are infinite ideas with this one. 

sweets/candy themed town -

there are lots of path qr codes about on tumblr for this idea.

regular town -

set out like an actual town, with road qr codes as the path and traffic signal pwps. have your player houses set out like shops, cafes, museums, cinemas. 

A stone tablet in Aneyoshi, Japan, warns residents not to build homes below it. Hundreds of these so-called tsunami stones, some more than six centuries old, dot the coast of Japan. Residents say this injunction from their ancestors kept their tiny village of 11 households safely out of reach of the deadly tsunami last month that wiped out hundreds of miles of Japanese coast and rose to record heights near here. The waves stopped just 300 feet below the stone. (Source)

Random Trinket Table

Have you ever thought to yourself, “Man, I want something useless but mildly interesting that isn’t from the trinket table in the player’s handbook!” Well, you’re in luck. Because I love random, useless trinkets and I’ve created a list for all to use. Even though there are plenty of other random trinket tables out there, you can never really have too many. Am I right or…? Anyways. Table below the cut!

Keep reading

You yourselves are our letter of recommendation, written on our hearts, to be known and read by all. And you show that you are a letter from Christ delivered by us, written not with ink but with the Spirit of the living God, not on tablets of stone but on tablets of human hearts. (2 Corinthians 3:2-3)

You are a letter from Christ, written with the ink of the living Spirit. Indeed, God is the author, but he gives us a pen as well. As believers, each of us joins together with the Lord in writing our letter—telling the story of Christ’s redemptive power.Think of all the lives who are reading your letter.

[…]  Here in my spheres of the Internet, it’s funny how everyone shares this idea that WRITING = fantasy and science fiction, that WRITERS are people who get loads of money to publish their space elf stories. I think we all found each other here and now because we share these roots of being The Bookish Children, who aspired to be Tolkien or Adams when we grew up, and I think that’s great, and I’m so glad we share all this.
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It’s weird, though, how our Writing About Writing then tends to be about fiction. And fiction is such a strange market, a really weird beast. I think that a lot of this post applies to fiction writers in a particularly toxic and demoralizing way but it’s also very true in nonfiction writing.
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As a kid you have all of these… IDEAS about nonfiction writing. That your textbooks and news stories and magazines and adventures and dictionaries and everything are prepared lovingly and truthfully by experts. Edited and approved by some great authority. It isn’t Authors or Writers who create this stuff; you don’t want to grow up to be them; they are oracles, not celebrities. There is still this perception that nonfiction is handed down benevolently, like stone tablets from God.
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And the truth of it is that nonfiction is handed down by whoever met the deadline first. These were generally not The Bookish Children whose Daydreams Finally Took Fruitful Wing. These were the ones who believed Terry Pratchett when he said “If you trust in yourself…and believe in your dreams…and follow your star…you’ll still get beaten by people who spent their time working hard and learning things and weren’t so lazy.”
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The truth is, natural talent attracts a certain magician’s-flair attention, but that the Content Machine is starving, and it gobbles up sparkly cupcakes just as fast as it gobbles up plain bread. The news cycle turns over. Nobody’s reading it carefully, thinking of the children, setting words to flake and texture against each other just so. They’re thinking of Wednesday. They’re afraid they’re about to be found out as Mediocre, and if they miss another deadline they will get the Raised Eyebrow.
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Talent is a pony you can ride for 3000 words, but when your job is 10,000 words a week then you need a fuckin trained warhorse that puts its head down and carries you stolidly through a battlefield of distractions and doesn’t listen when you try to steer it otherwise.
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So you get this dichotomy in Writing about Writing, where in Fiction Writing you’re encouraged to build an elaborate fairy grotto and arrange the correct pencils in pretty Mason jars to attract the attentions of a Muse, and then do a bit of performance art where you try to market yourself while also being very humble and modest - it’s not very evidence-based, is it? And in Nonfiction it’s just THROW WORDS AT THE PAGE UNTIL THEY STICK! THROW WORDS AT THE WALL - THROW WORDS AT YOUR MOTHER. THROW YOUR MOTHER AT THE WALL. FUCK FUCK BALLS THEY’RE SLIDING OFF!! FUCK HAND ME THAT CONCLUSION WE’LL NAIL IT INTO PLACE AND PAINT OVER IT AND IT’LL KIND OF… CRUST OVER. THIS IS CRAP, IT’S THE WORST THING I’VE EVER MADE, SEND THE FUCKER OUT THERE YES GOOD DONE.
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And the Nonfiction gets written, every damn day, thousands of words, filling up the Internet, bringing the news, coming through the radio, teaching the children, adorning the museums, educating the people, telling the truth, selling the product - it gets out there. But don’t think it isn’t creative, powerful, coming from some essential source - its pedigree is just as potent as fiction’s. This post may be terrible, but it has warhorses and cupcakes and all sorts of strange and alarming imagery. And most of nonfiction writing isn’t good. Most of it is workhorse, mediocre, bringing the truth to your mouth - some of it’s terrible. This certainly is.
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And you didn’t notice. You noticed it was there.
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Maybe try writing fiction like you’re writing nonfiction. Maybe it will help.
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-elodieunderglass
—  @elodieunderglass - such a fantastic response to this quote (originally a quote from Megan McArdle in an Atlantic article titled ‘Why Writers Are The Worst Procrastinators’) that i had to give it its own quote.

anonymous asked:

Do you have a favorite guide? something like "Story Plotting for Idiots" type thing? I think I'm pretty well read in terms of lit and movies and such. But I'm at a loss as to where to start to start working on my own. I have TONS of ideas, always have, but the organizing of something longer than say, 500 words always gets bogged down. HALP?

I guess the closest thing to a favourite writing guide that i have is Stephen King’s On Writing, though there’s less ‘this is how to do writing’ and more ‘this is how Stephen King does writing’. Fortunately, or unfortunately, depending on how you think of it, there’s no single way to approach writing that is going to work for everyone, it’s all very subjective and personal.

Even going from one project to another, sometimes the same approach won’t work, it’s a matter of what works for you at that moment, for that project.

You can google ‘how to write’ and you’ll come up with dozens of ‘foolproof’ guides and approaches, ‘save the cat’ or ‘the snowflake method’ or a dozen other things. Some of them will have elements that will be helpful to you, and you should feel free to cherrypick what you need and discard the rest – these approaches are written by people for whom they’ve worked. If it doesn’t work for you don’t agonise over it, just move on, try another approach. Keep on plugging.

That said, the one approach that I’ve consistently been able to use and have work for me, is a very blunt approach. Similar to Stephen King’s ‘write three pages a day every day’, and sort of inspired by the whole NaNoWriMo approach to writing, “BICHAK” (Butt in chair, hands on keyboard).

I call it ‘tippy tappy’.

What I do, is I have my ‘outline’ – which is usually a single sentence describing what will happen in a scene, plus a couple of sentences about the emotional/ conflict outcomes that should come from that scene – and then I sit down, set a fifteen minute timer, and just type until the buzzer goes.

So long as you keep tippy tappying on the keyboard for the whole amount of time, you’ll have something to show for it. One scene at a time, one fifteen minute chunk at a time, and that’s pretty much the only way I get anything substantial done.

Now as to HOW to plot?

I seldom know exactly how my story is going to go, or how exactly it will end. I’ve talked about a Problem based approach to narrative, and I start with that, generally. Here is a Problem that is going to affect the characters, who are these people and how are they going to react to it, what is going to happen in their lives as a result of the problem?

I’ll use my current project as an example, I’m about 4000 words in, it will probably wind up being around 60-80k by the time it’s finished. My outline so far encompasses the first two chapters. At the moment I don’t know exactly what the antagonist is going to do, but I do know how to lead up to it.

My outline looks like this:

[Sorry about the blurring, I just wanted to show how I have it laid out without folks reading my awful notes!]

So I have an A4 notepad, ruled with a line down the middle, just for personal preference. In blue headings and green notes, I have my outline for chapter one. I’ve finished all but the last scene in chapter one, and I’m at 4000 words in the manuscript, so you can see it’s a fairly compact way to outline. 

The black heading and red notes is for chapter two. It also just happens that I’m writing from alternating perspectives between my two protagonists, so the different colours helps keep those two POVs distinct. I may or may not write a chapter or two from the antagonist’s perspective at some point, and when it gets to that I might pick a third colour set to write those in, depending on how complex my notes are to look at.

When outlining, the main thing that needs to happen is that you have to be able to tell at a glance what you’re up to and what you wanted to happen next. I quite often get into trouble because I’ll start writing an outline and then wind up accidentally writing on my outlining page, I get so caught up in details that I forget the longer-term goals that I set out intending to write down.

Using bullet points to keep outlines manageable is something else that I’ve found helps. Keeping things simple ‘Jack wants X but he’s conflicted about Y and that leads to trouble with Z’. These are just the notes to remind yourself of the path you’re going to take. And if you find a path that branches off in a direction you didn’t expect, but it looks more exciting? Take the branching path. Keep your old notes in case it leads to a dead end, but after wandering around you’re going to have more material to work with, and more material is always good.

No writing is wasted.

I have TONS of ideas, always have, but the organizing of something longer than say, 500 words always gets bogged down

Okay, having tons of ideas is a way better problem than having not enough ideas, so we can work with this. 500 words is a great starting point.

  • Pick your favourite ideas that you think will fit together.
  • Decide what you think the big Problem of the story is going to be, what do your characters need to resolve in order to have an ending?
  • In one sentence, write down what will happen in the first scene
  • In 1-3 sentences, write down how the main character will feel about it, what changes for them in the course of that scene, and what they want going forward.
  • Do the same for the next two or three scenes.
  • Sit down at your writing implement of choice (computer, notebook, stone tablet, etc)
  • Set a timer. You can start with ten minutes and work your way up. Sometimes I do 20 minute or 30 minute stretches, but mostly I find that 15 minutes works best for me, personally.
  • Close all windows except for your writing project, pause netflix, turn the tv off. Have your outline beside you.
  • Start the timer and until it goes off you’re either writing, or you’re staring at the blank page. Trust me, writing is a whole lot better than looking at a blank page.
  • Keep writing. Tippy tappy.
  • When the timer goes off, go get a drink, walk around. Look at facebook or scroll tumblr, whatever you want to do.
  • Repeat until you have a novel.

Essentially, whatever system you pick can only take you so far, no matter how you organise it, writing a novel is a whole lot of just sitting down and writing. One letter after another until you have 80k words. Tippy tappy.

I find that not worrying too much about the whole novel helps. I just focus on the next 5000 words. I know what will happen in the next 5k, and I can write 500 words and then 500 words and then 500 words, and it adds up. 

The overarching Problem of the story keeps the gist of the scenes pointing in the right direction, and having the open-endedness of the plot as a whole means that if I suddenly discover a new direction as I’m writing I don’t have a whole bunch of outline work that I suddenly feel like I’m abandoning or losing.

Figuring out what outlining method works for you is going to take trial and effort, but you’ll get there. One scene at a time, one paragraph at a time. Every little bit will help you learn what you’re doing and what you want to do.

hacked town ideas

I have a lot of these;; If you’re hacking your town or starting a fresh town to hack, maybe these ideas will come in useful!

  • A desert town. No grass, no plaza stone and no river (or else a very small one if you want to catch river fish yourself), just a handful of scattered ponds to act as oases! Palm trees, flowers and buildings are clustered around the oases. Out in the barren desert are a few pyramids, a sphinx, maybe some scarce weeds. Might be cool to have a hot spring or a water pump out in the middle of nowhere.
  • A jungle town. LOTS of grass and palms and tropical fruit and hibiscuses and lilies ahHHH!! Like four waterfalls. Huge beaches. COLOR and PLANTS are just everywhere. Geysers and stone tablets and moai statues?? Villagers that used to be islanders YES and baskets of fruit as decoration and cute stepping stone paths!
  • A post-apocolyptic town. Very little water, not much grass, modern everything. Dead trees and lots of weeds. Could use a lot of different PWPs for this… streetlight? Bus stop, pile of pipes, fire pit? Paths that look like cracked highways! Cluster most of the buildings in the center somewhere and have a few villagers living alone in the wastelands.
  • An icy forest town. Always winter and cedar trees EVERYWHERE! Lots of waterfalls and ponds. Small tiny beaches, most only accessible by swimming. Sooo many penguin villagers. Illuminated trees would be really pretty dotted throughout a thick forest. White and blue flowers, water fountains, zen renovations cause they look a little cabin-y if you squint.
  • A farm town?? There’s a way to manually set grass deterioration, I’m not sure how that works but it would be so cool to set up little fields of dirt and decorate with flower seed bags and fruit baskets! Persimmons could be pumpkins and for other growing things make use of patterns. Scarecrow and rice rack PWPs would be super cute, and a water well! Lots of tree orchards. Could use bamboo to make a ‘corn’ maze. A resident’s house could be decked out as a farmer’s market!
  • An enchanted forest. The town tree is in the middle of a big forest and not on any plaza stone. To get to it you follow a little path behind town hall. Town hall, Retail and whatever other important buildings are all clustered together, and the villagers are dotted throughout the forest. Lots of illuminated PWPs. Always summertime so fireflies float around the ponds and rivers! Fairytale renovations and PWPs.

hey you know what’d be fun imagine if zelda was there when they put link into the shrine of resurrection and he was still awake and learned he was going to forget her :)))) ) :)) 

im not sorry

He was dying.

There was no way around it. She could see the blood seeping out of his wounds, warm and then cold all at once, his eyes opening and shutting as they galloped through the fields on horseback. When they finally got to the cave, and down into the shrine, Zelda was hesitant in laying Link down on the stone tablet. He was waking up a little, but her heart was aching all the same.

Goddesses, it hurts.

Zel-” 

“Ssh,” she whispered - her face was red, stained with tears, and she held onto his hand tight.

“What’s-” he coughed. 

“Don’t talk, boy,” another voice interjected. Zelda saw his eyes glance behind her - of course, Purah and Robbie were there, but Robbie had had the foresight to stay outside.

“Please, Purah - I’ll meet you outside.” 

The tall sheikah left with a sigh, casting a lingering look at Link over her shoulder as she went. Once she was out of earshot, Zelda broke down into heavy sobs, clutching Link’s hand close to hers. He coughed more, eyes shut in concentration.

“You’re going to be okay,” Zelda finally said, swallowing. “This is the shrine of resurrection.”

“So why-” he protested, looking up at her helplessly, but the words caught in his mouth. So why am I still crying? It was hard to say. Was she that selfish that even in the midst of a miracle, she’d feel her heartbreaking into pieces? He was about to leave her for a hundred years - and forget everything. But at least… Hyrule would possibly be saved…

“You’re going to - you’re going to forget,” she replied quietly, stifling more tears. “It’s going to be a century at least before we see each other again, if - if everything goes as planned - and you won’t… you won’t remember me, or anyone.” 

“No- please-”  Link was clearly incredulous, blue eyes wide in shock. He struggled a little, but it was clear he had no strength left.

“It’s the price you pay for resurrection, Link,” Zelda replied, trying to smile a little bit as if it was reassuring. “You’re still the chosen hero. We need you.” 

“I need you.”

“I’ll be there. I’m sure you’ll find me, Link. I know you’ll find me again,” she said, her voice breaking. 

You’re just saying that to reassure yourself. Even if that was the case, Zelda couldn’t help it. This had to work. He had to wake up and save Hyrule. It didn’t matter how she felt; she loved him, but there was no use telling him now. What mattered was the kingdom. Sacrificing his memory of her, of his previous life, was the only way they had a fighting chance. She looked back at Link expectantly, wondering how soon it would be before he passed into stasis. Water was filling in the tub around him, a sign that Purah had started the countdown.

Link lifted a hand to touch her cheek. Zelda glanced at him in surprise, and saw tears sitting in his eyes. Was it because he was in pain?

“If I forget,” he whispered,  “I’m sure… I’ll just fall in love with you again.”

Zelda could do nothing but stare at him in disbelief as his hand lowered back down onto the stone tablet. Link’s eyes fell shut, a long breath escaping him as he lost consciousness. Her mouth dropped open. 

…all this time…

love?

Immersing Yourself in Your Target Language

Immersing yourself in a foreign language can be difficult if you don’t live in the country where the language is spoken. But it doesn’t have to be. Here are a few ways that you can surround yourself with your target lang. 


Technology

You’re probably reading this post on a laptop, a phone or on an ancient stone tablet. Change the language of your devices to your target language. I’ve done this for Spanish, French, and Romanian, and it helped me get used to seeing these languages and reading in them. 

Social Media

Do the same thing for your Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and any other site to which you’re hopelessly addicted. You’ll learn internet specific words and your brain will adjust to reading in the language that you’re learning. 

Movies 

Netflix and Youtube offer a wide selection of movies and videos in other langs. Your brain will pick up on the different sounds and internalize them. Before you know it, you’ll understand the spoken language like a pro.
Actively watching foreign films will help you discover new slang, learn key phrases, and become familiar with other aspects of the language like interjections.

Music

Listening to music in other languages will help you adjust to the new sounds you may be encountering in your L2. When I was learning Spanish, bachata was my savior.
On Spotify, you can search for music by country. If you’re learning Portuguese and you pick Brazil, you’ll find popular music in Portuguese that you can use to improve your listening skills. Don’t forget to look up the lyrics and translate them to learn new vocabulary. Find some music that you enjoy, dive into the culture, and learn something new. 

Good luck,
Jeremy