Stop Motion animation experiment by @treatstudios combines light painting with a tablet with a sliced looping seabed to create a holographic effect:

This short experimental piece of animation was was created using several processes, all of which began off life inside the computer. With the help of simple laser cutting, an iPad, a homemade motion rig and DSLR Danny and Alex created a unique stop-frame animation using long exposure photography to bring all these processes together in perfect synergy.

The film began life as simple animation of a whale swimming. Each frame of the animation was then saved as an individual CGI file, this file was then turned into a movie, where-by the form and position of the whale was record, “CAT scan style” from head to tail. These movies were then played on an iPad which was attached to the motion rig. As the movies played out, the iPad would steadily move along the track, re-drawing the shape of the 3D whale in real space. This process was captured using the DSLR camera via long exposures, the camera would record the light from each movie, as the iPad moved from A to B on the motion rig, turning the movie on the iPad into a single photograph on the camera

The secondary process was creating the environment for the whale to exist in - our “looping seabed’’. This was designed in the computer as a tiling CGI model, which was then divided into 2mm thick slices and laser cut from MDF wood. The slices stack back together in real life creating an infinitely looping seabed for our whale to swim over. 

More Here

Holy butts, so I got this trimmer line for new pen nibs for my tablet and it is AMAZING. I highly recommend this over buying more premade ones, especially the wacom ones.
I have had my tablet for years and have always hated the scratchy plastic to tablet sound so I looked for an alternative on YouTube. Found this video –> ( videooo ) and it shows trimmer line, fine sandpaper and like 5 mins and poof, new nibs for cheap! (Like 10-12$ on Amazon)
Supposedly they last like 3 times as long as the Wacom ones (will see later!) But even if they don’t there is enough trimmer line to last me hundreds of nibs xD
So I tried out the one I made and it is like drawing with butterrrr, the sound as well as the smoothness of the lines are both a million times better than my old nibs. Anyone who has a tablet go buy these noooowww!

P.S. Happy Holidays to all of you lovelies <3

Happy Thanksgiving everyone!

I know it’s been a while since I last posted, but I’m glad I was able to finish something for today. These past few months have been a bit rough but I’m glad you guys continued to support me. I’m really thankful for you all and the friends and family who stuck by. You all mean so much to me. So thank you.

A 3,800-year journey from classroom to classroom

Thirty-eight hundred years ago, on the hot river plains of what is now southern Iraq, a Babylonian student did a bit of schoolwork that changed our understanding of ancient mathematics. The student scooped up a palm-sized clump of wet clay, formed a disc about the size and shape of a hamburger, and let it dry down a bit in the sun. On the surface of the moist clay the student drew a diagram that showed the people of the Old Babylonian Period (1,900–1,700 B.C.E.) fully understood the principles of the “Pythagorean Theorem” 1300 years before Greek geometer Pythagoras was born, and were also capable of calculating the square root of two to six decimal places.

Today, thanks to the Internet and new digital scanning methods being employed at Yale, this ancient geometry lesson continues to be used in modern classrooms around the world.

“This geometry tablet is one of the most-reproduced cultural objects that Yale owns—it’s published in mathematics textbooks the world over,” says Professor Benjamin Foster, curator of the Babylonian Collection, which includes the tablet. Read more.