tableaux vivant

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Sergei Parajanov and David Abashidze, “Ashik Kerib” (1988)

In a period of the undefined past, Ashik Kerib is a wandering minstrel, a lute player and singer, who falls for a rich merchant’s daughter, is spurned by the father (minstrels are poor functionaries), and is despatched, to wander for 1001 nights, but not before he’s made the girl promise not to marry till his return. True to Paradjanov’s unique method, the ensuing episodic tale of his meetings, experiences, difficulties and growth are told in a blaze of visually splendid ‘tableaux vivants’ and miraculous images and symbols (doves, swans, pomegranates), intercut with religious iconic works and artefacts, and overlaid with song and poetry. The source is a story by poet Mikhail Lermontov, but the interpretation, though grounded in the world of ethnic cultural references of the Azerbaijani peoples, is free, open, sensual and personal. There are coded messages of the tribulations of the artist here, and also a playful, mischievous comedic tone that allays any feeling of self-absorbtion on the director’s part. 

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 Windsor Castle, 10 february 1854  |Tableaux of the Seasons

Apart from acting in plays, the children also created tableaux vivants. On such occasion the Queen always remarked that her husband was “much pleased” with the entertainment, which consisted of thematic stage pictures, scenerey, musical accompaniment, and, sometimes, poetic recitation. The tableau vivant - a peculiarly nineteenth-century form of drawing room entertainment - was based on the popular theatrical convention of concluding scenes with a stage picture that, by temporarily suspending speech and action, effectively turned the performance into a living painting. Tableaux performed in private were not generally scenes from plays, but were more likely to recreate historical events, represent mythological and literaru figures. 

Queen Victoria and the Theatre of Her Age by R. Schoch.

This Tableaux was performed at Windsor Castle in the Rubens Room in 1854 by the seven eldest children of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert to mark their parent’s 14th wedding anniversary. The scenes were based on The Seasons by the 18th century poet James Thomson and were photographed by Roger Fenton.

 Queen Victoria recorded in her journal that: “5 tableaux were performed, 4, representing the seasons. Alice, as spring, recited some very pretty verses from Thompson’s Season - Vicky as summer, with dear little Arthur asleep amongst corn sheaves, also recited verses, - Affie, as Bacchus, representing Autumn, also saying some verses, - & Bertie, with a long white beard & cloak covered with snow, Louise, in a sort of Russian costume, sitting before a fire, represented Winter. He also recited some verses taken and adapted from Thompson’s Seasons. This was almost the prettiest tableau. The 5th & last one combined the 4 others, which had each been separately represent d. In the clouds, at the back, stood dear little Lenchen, reciting very pretty verses specially written for the purpose by Mr Martin Tupper, as the Spirit of the Empress Helena.The scenery was admirably adapted to each Tableau & appropriate music was played between each. They all looked and did their parts so well…We were all delighted, & the whole, was such a pretty idea’.

Princess Victoria as Summer | Prince Albert Edward as Winter | Princess Alice as Spring | Prince Alfred as Autumn | Prince Arthur as Summer | Princess Helena as the Spirit Empress | Princess Louise as Winter

Oscar Gustave Rejlander :: ‘The Two Ways of Life’, a moralistic photomontage of Rejlander’s own work, 1857 (the first photomontage in history)

In 1857 Rejlander made his best-known allegorical work: The Two Ways of Life. This was a seamlessly montaged combination print made of thirty-two images in about six weeks. First exhibited at the Manchester Art Treasures Exhibition of 1857, the work shows two youths being offered guidance by a patriarch. Each youth looks toward a section of a stage-like tableaux vivant - one youth is shown the virtuous pleasures and the other the sinful pleasures. / source: Wikipedia

more [+] by this photographer

18/09/2017

❣️Amos,*[sic] Amas, Amat❣️


*Amo=I love, Amas=you love, Amat!=s/he/it loves! Latin verb conjugation.


Amos, once again looking fabulous in this rustic tableaux vivant!


Amos the miniature donkey lives at Soul Space Animal Farm Sanctuary, New Richmond, Wisconsin. He is very popular with visitors due to the very virtue of being a donkey, in addition to his small stature, cuteness and charm.

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Tableaux Vivant Deux (Living Picture 2) @ Tom of Finland Foundation.

A live art showcase of well known Tom of Finland Art.

Opening Scene
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Tableaux Vivant Deux (Living Picture 2) @ Tom of Finland Foundation.

A live art showcase of well known Tom of Finland Art.

The Motorcycle Thief

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Tableaux Vivant Deux (Living Picture 2) @ Tom of Finland Foundation.

A live art showcase of well known Tom of Finland Art.

The Motorcycle Thief