table 166

4

Late Arrival.

This little thing is my contribution to Stolen Feathers, a zine about owls and faeries.. or possibly faery owls, well there are lots of beaks and wings that’s for sure. 

It was made with (and mainly by) the patient and lovely Arachnodenist and Myrntai and available for grabbing at Thought Bubble Festival in Leeds next month.  I’ll also have copies of two newly printed Stutterhug mini comics (gasp) and maybe a very limited supply of my Steven Universe variants. 

We will be at table 166 New Dock Hall, come say hello !

Medieval Feasting

Meals and Courses

The first meal of the day was breakfast, which took place whenever you woke up. Breakfast wasn’t a formal meal and mostly consisted of people eating a few bites before heading out to the fields. Normal breakfast foods were leftovers, sop (bread dipped in milk, ale, wine, or water), and fish (in England).

The first official meal of the day was dinner, which took place from 10 am-12 pm. The second meal of the day was supper, which took place in the evening (Singman and McLean 163). The evening meal was lighter and the time for relaxation; actors, bards, and poets were invited to perform (Bishop 135). Practice varied on which meal was larger. Some laborers had a midday snack of bread and ale and called in noon-shenche or nuncheon, which ultimately gave way to luncheon and lunch. The very rich ate a meal after supper called rear-supper, or, in modern parlance, late night fridge raid.

Ordinary people ate all their food at once. If you were rich, you could afford to have it served in courses. The more courses you had, the wealthier you were. Joffrey’s all-day, seventy-seven course wedding feast in A Storm of Swords is improbable, as most dinners or suppers had four to six courses, not including dishes between courses, which were called entrements or subtleties and more designed for the eye than the mouth (more on them later) (Singman and McLean 163). Most dinners also only lasted about two hours (Mortimer 181). Unlike today, courses went from heaviest to lightest. The first course was the main dish (usually a red meat of some kind) and the dishes following were salads, finger food, or pastries. Sometimes you were only served the main course and the later courses were only for rich or distinguished guests (Singman and McLean 163-4). In 1363, Edward III decreed lords could only have five courses per meal, gentlemen could have three, and grooms could have two (Mortimer 180).

Table Settings & Dining Hall

Most dining halls were actually multipurpose rooms used for all main activities, such as holding court, dancing, etc. Dining tables were long boards set on trestles that could be removed at a moment’s notice (S & M 166). In wealthier households, nobles had contraptions that would raise the tables from a lower level or lower them from a higher level when they were needed (Lacroix 176).

The table was first covered with a tablecloth, then with towels or napkins. In poorer houses they were made of hemp or canvas. Yeomen, merchants, skilled workers, and franklins were likely to use white linen. The richest used silk. People sat on wood stools which sometimes had cushions on them.

The place settings were not elaborate: a napkin, a trencher, a bowl, a cup, and a spoon. Rich houses could afford silver and glass place settings. The poor used wood and ceramics. Pewter served as a middle ground. There were no knives at the place setting because most people had their own eating knife that they brought with them (S & M 166). Knives were single-edged, pointed (they had to spear as well as cut), and smaller than its lethal counterpart the dagger.

Spoons were provided by most households. They were made of wood (boxwood, juniper, popular), bone, horn, pewter, latten (copper and zinc alloy), silver, or gold. They were usually 6-7 in. long. Travelers used a folding spoon, which was hinged in the middle to save space. Forks would not become vogue until the 1600s (S & M 167). During the fourteenth century, the Avignon pope had a few forks made of gold and crystal (Bishop 134).

Keep reading

Thought Bubble Festival!

If you are in the area and would like some real on paper comics from me please come and find me at table 166 New Dock Hall this weekend, I’m tabling with Arachnodenist and myrntai - COME AND ASK US ABOUT OUR OWLS. 

Now here is some slightly fuzzy photographic evidence of Stutterhug minicomics: