t shirt on minimalism

Come Around More Often

Request:  hey! could you do a smut where you and arzaylea hook up regularly and she’s going down on you and then Luke walks in and catches you and you say that you’ve never really don’t much With a guy so arzaylea suggests that she teaches you and you shows you how to like fuck/suck him off?

A/n: So with enough persuasion from some lovely followers, I deiced to accept this request. I’m sorry if any of this is inaccurate, I don’t really know the mannerisms and vocabulary of  Arzaylea (I just watched some of her sc’s and vines on youtube). Anyways, thanks to the anon who requested this, hopefully you like it. I might end up doing more 5sos in the future…  PS: sorry it’s so long lol

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[image description: 1-  a red and white polka dot marble maze, a white with pink-themed dessert-print marble maze, and a paper maze pattern. Both mazes, while having different patterns, bear chain stitching maze outlines and one blanket-stitched edge. 2 - the red-polka dot marble maze shown front face up, displaying the red chain stitching, beside the dessert-print marble maze shown back face up, displaying the pale pink minky fleece backing, unmarked by the stitching.]

Handsewn Marble Maze Tutorial

Components

  • A paper pattern the size of your maze. (Most tutorials don’t give sizes! I’ve been using rectangles 18.5 x 11.5 cm wide, which works for me and my hands; you might like it bigger or smaller. This includes a .5 cm seam allowance; if you need a 1 cm seam allowance, add .5 cm all the way around.)
  • Three pieces of fabric the size of your maze (cut using said pattern). I’ve been using one piece patterned flannelette for the front, one piece minky fleece (but it could also be flannelette) for the back and one piece whatever scrap fabric I’ve got, as you won’t see this, for the middle. (Fabric with minimal fray, like ribbing or T-shirt fabric or knit, is easiest to handle. Quilting cottons are a pain.)
  • A ruler and pencil.
  • A tracing wheel or sewing chalk or one of those fade-away pens/pencils.
  • Sewing thread and needle (I use plain white for the inside as nobody sees it, matching or contrasting colour for the outside).
  • Scissors.
  • A marble.

Instructions

  • Draw your maze on your paper. I’ve been leaving columns and gaps of 3.5 cm (not including the seam allowance at the edge) for the marble to pass through.
  • Take your front fabric and your scrap fabric piece and pin them together so the front side (the pretty side) of the front fabric faces out.
  • Draw or trace (I use a tracer wheel over the paper pattern; others might find copying the lines with a ruler via a pencil, chalk or pen easier to use) your marble design on the front side (the pretty side) of the front fabric. Using a ruler with your tracer wheel helps keep lines straight.
  • Sew along the maze lines. I’ve been using a chain stitch because I can, but a back stitch will also work. Don’t use a running stitch, because you don’t want gaps in the stitching; you need a full line of stitching. I’d double-thread this, because the stitching is meant to be slightly decorative.
  • Take your finished maze design (the front and the scrap fabric sewn together) and the back fabric and place them front sides facing in. (You should have the wrong side of the fleece and the scrap fabric, marked by the less-neat lines of stitching, facing towards you.) Pin together.
  • Sew around three edges (two long, one short if a rectangle) of your maze, sewing through the three layers of fabric. Because the materials I’ve been using don’t fray badly, I’ve been using a back stitch (I back stitch everything) with small stitches and leaving the edges raw. If you’re concerned about fraying, back stitch, and then go over the edges with a blanket or mattress stitch.
  • Turn your maze right-way out. You’ll have the maze at the top and a pocket at the back. Slide a marble between the front and middle layers and push it down to the bottom of your maze (testing your maze at the same time). Tuck the raw edges (the two maze edges together, the back edge separately) inside the pocket and blanket/mattress stitch or whip stitch it shut.

Your maze will look like the mazes in the second image: stitching in the front, neat and smooth expanse of minky fleece (great for stroking) in the back!