systemic problem

"Whoa, What Are Those For?" CF Medications In Public

If you know anything about Cystic Fibrosis, you probably are aware of the insane amount of pills and other therapies that we require in our everyday life. While there are a lot of medications, patients with CF, like me, still have to go on with our lives like a normal person. This includes having to do our medications in public. When I have to take my Cystic Fibrosis medication in public, I am usually pretty discreet about it. Although, sometimes it’s hard to keep them from being seen. When I was in elementary school at lunch, I was asked many times about my enzymes. Being that young, I only understood that I needed them to digest my food. So, that’s what I told my classmates. Nowadays, people are aware I have something going on due to my constant supplemental oxygen. When I go to eat and pull out my 6 horse-sized enzyme pills, I get a “Whoa, what are those for?” or a “What are those for? They are HUGE. I can hardly take one small pill!” I use this time to create awareness for Cystic Fibrosis and explain that while CF affects my lungs, it also affects my digestive system causing a problem absorbing nutrients and breaking down food. 

Another medication that is hard to hide is my breathing nebulizer machine. Sometimes I have to do it in public. When I was younger I was embarrassed, due to all the stares I received. Now, I do it with confidence because there’s nothing to be ashamed of. Some people come up to me and ask me about it. Like the enzymes, I always tell people about Cystic Fibrosis because it’s impossible to get awareness out without talking about. Plus, if the public is not educated about it, then there likely won’t be enough funding for a cure or drug development. When I get asked about my breathing treatment, I explain that I have a genetic illness called CF that causes my lungs to fill with sticky mucus that will eventually grow bacteria and cause my lungs to scar, which is irreversible. This can lead to needing a double lung transplant when the lungs are too scarred up and the lung function drops too low. So, in order to get this junk out of my lungs and to breathe easy, I need nebulized breathing treatments. 

I am never embarrassed when people ask me questions in public about my medication. I find it as a way to open up someone’s eyes and heart to the struggles of a person with Cystic Fibrosis. I always hope that after speaking to the public, I spark an interest in them to go research it and hopefully get involved with their Cystic Fibrosis community to find a cure. Hopefully one day we will have a cure. That’s a world I dream about :) 

-Tiffany Rich 

Liberals, we need you now to join an actual #Resistance to Trump, fascism, and capitalism, the latter of which will perpetually produce the conditions that breed the former. Support us in the battle against oppression, understand that these problems are systemic, and move to the left. Oppression can’t be defeated with centrism.

Oh and stop calling the cops on direct actioneers.

How to make study dates more about studying (and have fun at the same time)

7 useful tips on spicing up and/or sweetening the productive study sessions with your luvah 🔥


  1. If a class includes requires reading, curl up on the couch and read aloud to each other. If you have the time to goof off a bit, read it in funny accents or voices, just for shits and giggles.
  2. It’s a no-brainer that during a study date, you’ll need some snacks. Stay productive and spice up the date by feeding each other *healthy* and romantic food like chocolate covered strawberries or dark chocolate in general.
  3. Use each other as a reward system. For every maths problem you correctly complete, you get a kiss or a hug or a neck massage.
  4. Go somewhere to study together. Have a picnic in the park or visit your local coffee shop and type away while playing footsie under the table. New environments are exciting and refreshing and add a sense of occasion to an otherwise boring cram-marathon.
  5. Make a game out of it. If you two have the same assignment that has numbered questions like maths, see who can correctly answer the most amount of questions in a limited amount of time. This will introduce competitive motivation and help identify where the holes in your understanding or process may be, as well as make it more fun.
  6. Make it a group date. Invite another couple(s) to join you to pool resources in case they can help you with an assignment, and to make it more fun.
  7. Flashcards can be fun with a partner, and bring in the aforementioned reward system. Boom. You’ve got a nice and steamy game show

Request another prompt list/ writing advice post here

9

WHAT KEEPS ME GOING AND PLAYING OVER 200 HOURS  (ノ ;▽ ;)ノ 

my obsession is real AND I CAN KEEP GOING FOR THAT 200 PHOTO ALBUM LIMIT.. Another Prompto appreciation post!

BONUS: 

PERFECT TIMING

  • What people think gaining a lot of fictive headmates at once is like: Oh hooty hoo wowie look at all my favorite fictional characters gosh i love this UwU
  • What it's actually like: WHO THE FUCK ARE YOU WHY ARE YOU HERE WHAT THE FUCK IS GOING ON AAAAAAA GO AWAY WE DONT NEED MORE WHAT THE FUCL
DID problems
  • Me, trying to get on with "adult" life: rapid switching, littles wanting to play at inappropriate times, noisy head, unable to concentrate on anything for long, alters fronting for days at a time etc.
  • Me, when the body is ill: silent head, little or no switching, feeling completely alone in dealing with illness.
MBTI Types’ Shadow

“The shadow is a moral problem that challenges the whole ego-personality, for no one can become conscious of the shadow without considerable moral effort. To become conscious of it involves recognizing the dark aspects of the personality as present and real. This act is the essential condition for any kind of self-knowledge.” ~ Carl Jung

ESTP

Flexible and tolerant, they take a pragmatic approach focused on immediate results. Theories and conceptual explanations bore them – they want to act energetically to solve the problem. Focus on the here-and-now, spontaneous, enjoy each moment that they can be active with others. Enjoy material comforts and style. Learn best through doing.

  • ESTP  Shadow: ISTJ.
    Can become stubborn about their perception of the past and fixated on its relation to the present (Si). Can become critical, disgruntled with disorder, illogical, or inefficiency (Te). Rigidly following a belief system or what they personally think is important, with accompanying childish and/or selfish behaviour (Fi). Over-reading between the lines, often misinterpreting someone’s actions and seeing negative intentions where there are none (Ne).

ISTP

Tolerant and flexible, quiet observers until a problem appears, then act quickly to find workable solutions. Analyze what makes things work and readily get through large amounts of data to isolate the core of practical problems. Interested in cause and effect, organize facts using logical principles, value efficiency.

  • ISTP Shadow: ESTJ
    Can become stubborn about organising things and insist on a systematic approach (Te). Prefer not to focus on the past but can be quite critical of past performances and overuse negative experiences to inform decisions (Si). Interpret situations in a naive way, inferring malice where none exists (Ne). Spend money and time on things that are unimportant and care little about the value of things (Fi).

ESFP

Outgoing, friendly, and accepting. Exuberant lovers of life, people, and material comforts. Enjoy working with others to make things happen. Bring common sense and a realistic approach to their work, and make work fun. Flexible and spontaneous, adapt readily to new people and environments. Learn best by trying a new skill with other people.

  • ESFP Shadow: ISFJ
    Can become stubborn about their perception of the past and fixated on its relation to the present (Si). Can be quite critical and disgruntled about the expectations of the group to the point of rebellion and disengaging (Fe). May make statements or believe in ideas that are contradictory and illogical (Ti). Over-reading between the lines, often misinterpreting someone’s actions and seeing negative intentions where there are none (Ne).

ISFP

Quiet, friendly, sensitive, and kind. Enjoy the present moment, what’s going on around them. Like to have their own space and to work within their own time frame. Loyal and committed to their values and to people who are important to them. Dislike disagreements and conflicts, do not force their opinions or values on others.

  • ISFP Shadow: ESFJ
    Stubborn about how others affect them and resist being pulled into being responsible for others feelings and choices (Fe). Prefer not to focus on the past but can be quite critical of past performances and overuse negative experiences to inform decisions (Si). Interpret situations in a naive way, inferring malice where none exists (Ne). Caught up in pointing out others’ inconsistencies, with a dogmatic tendency to adhere to one principle rather than seeing its distinctions (Ti).

ESTJ

Practical, realistic, matter-of-fact. Decisive, quickly move to implement decisions. Organize projects and people to get things done, focus on getting results in the most efficient way possible. Take care of routine details. Have a clear set of logical standards, systematically follow them and want others to also. Forceful in implementing their plans.

  • ESTJ Shadow: ISTP
    Can be stubborn about the models and principles they’ve adopted, categorising everything simplistically and robotically following the principles (Ti). Go on about “facts,” blocking others’ proposed actions, or get caught up in the moment and engage in impulsive behaviour (Se). Envision how something will play out and ignore signs that it won’t work out, foreseeing disaster or nothing at all (Ni). Convinced others don’t like, appreciate, or need them, and over-accommodate others needs (Fe)

ISTJ

Quiet, serious, earn success by thoroughness and dependability. Practical, matter-of-fact, realistic, and responsible. Decide logically what should be done and work toward it steadily, regardless of distractions. Take pleasure in making everything orderly and organized – their work, their home, their life. Value traditions and loyalty.

  • ISTJ Shadow: ESTP
    Stubborn about going on impulse and insist that they have an accurate read of the situation (Se). Prefer not to articulate operating principles and can get stuck in models and frameworks they have learned or adapted (Ti). Over-address others’ concerns and feel disappointment over a false sense of closeness (Fe). Make dire predictions with certainty and mistake deep symbolism as a guidepost for life (Ni).

ESFJ

Warmhearted, conscientious, and cooperative. Want harmony in their environment, work with determination to establish it. Like to work with others to complete tasks accurately and on time. Loyal, follow through even in small matters. Notice what others need in their day-by-day lives and try to provide it. Want to be appreciated for who they are and for what they contribute.

  • ESFJ Shadow: ISFP
    Be stubborn about values as they crusade for a particular cause, turning off people instead of mobilising them (Fi). Go on about “facts,” blocking others’ proposed actions, or get caught up in the moment and engage in impulsive behaviour (Se). Envision how something will play out and ignore signs that it won’t work out, foreseeing disaster or nothing at all (Ni). analyse, lash out if others criticise their logic with emotional arguments, and make subjective arguments (Te).

ISFJ

Quiet, friendly, responsible, and conscientious. Committed and steady in meeting their obligations. Thorough, painstaking, and accurate. Loyal, considerate, notice and remember specifics about people who are important to them, concerned with how others feel. Strive to create an orderly and harmonious environment at work and at home.

  • ISFJ Shadow: ESFP
    Stubborn about going on impulse and insist that they have an accurate read of the situation (Se). Dwell on conflicts in beliefs, being critical, and locking into their desires by bulldozing others (Fi). Spend unnecessary time establishing order, planning, and misguide themselves and others in the process (Te). Make dire predictions with certainty and mistake deep symbolism as a guidepost for life (Ni)

ENTJ

Frank, decisive, assume leadership readily. Quickly see illogical and inefficient procedures and policies, develop and implement comprehensive systems to solve organizational problems. Enjoy long-term planning and goal setting. Usually well informed, well read, enjoy expanding their knowledge and passing it on to others. Forceful in presenting their ideas.

  • ENTJ Shadow: INTP
    Can be stubborn about the models and principles they’ve adopted, categorising everything simplistically and robotically following the principles (Ti). Oblivious to unspoken potentials and get off track with inferences and interconnections (Ne). Cling to what they are used to; repeat themselves in ritualistic fashion (Si). Convinced others don’t like, appreciate, or need them, and over-accommodate others’ needs (Fe).

INTJ

Have original minds and great drive for implementing their ideas and achieving their goals. Quickly see patterns in external events and develop long-range explanatory perspectives. When committed, organize a job and carry it through. Skeptical and independent, have high standards of competence and performance – for themselves and others.

  • INTJ Shadow: ENTP
    Be stubborn about responding to emerging information and locking on to a hidden meaning (Ne). Prefer not to articulate operating principles and can get stuck in models and frameworks they have learned or adapted (Ti). Over-address others’ concerns and feel disappointment over a false sense of closeness (Fe). Get stuck in impressions of how things were and resist change; waste time reviewing the impact of the past (Si).

ENTP

Quick, ingenious, stimulating, alert, and outspoken. Resourceful in solving new and challenging problems. Adept at generating conceptual possibilities and then analyzing them strategically. Good at reading other people. Bored by routine, will seldom do the same thing the same way, apt to turn to one new interest after another.

  • ENTP Shadow: INTJ
    Be stubborn about perceptions of how the future will be, and lock onto a vision that won’t happen (Ni). Can become critical, disgruntled with disorder, illogic, or inefficiency (Te). Rigidly following a belief system or what they personally think is important, with accompanying childish and/or selfish behaviour (Fi). Excessively seek physical stimulation or following the urge to do nothing; zero in on isolated details, acting impulsively on them (Se).

INTP

Seek to develop logical explanations for everything that interests them. Theoretical and abstract, interested more in ideas than in social interaction. Quiet, contained, flexible, and adaptable. Have unusual ability to focus in depth to solve problems in their area of interest. Skeptical, sometimes critical, always analytical.

  • INTP Shadow: ENTJ
    Can become stubborn about organising things and insist on a systematic approach (Te). Indulge negative thoughts of how events will unfold (Ni). Dwell on the perceived “realities” of a situation; act highly impulsively (Se). Spend money and time on things that are unimportant and care little about the value of things (Fi).

ENFJ

Warm, empathetic, responsive, and responsible. Highly attuned to the emotions, needs, and motivations of others. Find potential in everyone, want to help others fulfill their potential. May act as catalysts for individual and group growth. Loyal, responsive to praise and criticism. Sociable, facilitate others in a group, and provide inspiring leadership.

  • ENFJ Shadow: INFP
    Be stubborn about values as they crusade for a particular cause, turning off people instead of mobilising them (Fi). Oblivious to unspoken potentials and get off track with inferences and interconnections (Ne). Cling to what they are used to; repeat themselves in ritualistic fashion (Si). analyse, lash out if others criticise their logic with emotional arguments, and make subjective arguments (Te).

INFJ

Seek meaning and connection in ideas, relationships, and material possessions. Want to understand what motivates people and are insightful about others. Conscientious and committed to their firm values. Develop a clear vision about how best to serve the common good. Organized and decisive in implementing their vision.

  • INFJ Shadow: ENFP
    Be stubborn about responding to emerging information and locking on to a hidden meaning (Ne). Dwell on conflicts in beliefs, being critical, and locking into their desires by bulldozing others (Fi). Spend unnecessary time establishing order, planning, and misguide themselves and others in the process (Te). Get stuck in impressions of how things were and resist change; waste time reviewing the impact of the past (Si)

ENFP

Warmly enthusiastic and imaginative. See life as full of possibilities. Make connections between events and information very quickly, and confidently proceed based on the patterns they see. Want a lot of affirmation from others, and readily give appreciation and support. Spontaneous and flexible, often rely on their ability to improvise and their verbal fluency.

  • ENFP Shadow: INFJ
    Be stubborn about perceptions of how the future will be, and lock onto a vision that won’t happen (Ni). Can be quite critical and disgruntled about the expectations of the group to the point of rebellion and disengaging (Fe). May make statements or believe in ideas that are contradictory and illogical (Ti). Excessively seek physical stimulation or following the urge to do nothing; zero in on isolated details, acting impulsively on them (Se)

INFP

Idealistic, loyal to their values and to people who are important to them. Want an external life that is congruent with their values. Curious, quick to see possibilities, can be catalysts for implementing ideas. Seek to understand people and to help them fulfill their potential. Adaptable, flexible, and accepting unless a value is threatened.

  • INFP Shadow: ENFJ
    Stubborn about how others affect them and resist being pulled into being responsible for others feelings and choices (Fe). Indulge negative thoughts of how events will unfold (Ni). Dwell on the perceived “realities” of a situation; act highly impulsively (Se). Caught up in pointing out others’ inconsistencies, with a dogmatic tendency to adhere to one principle rather than seeing its distinctions (Ti).

Sylvana Simons, the first ever black female party leader of a European political party.

“Racism, sexism and Islamophobia are widespread, not just in the Netherlands but in most parts of Western Europe. I was tolerated when I was an entertainer. But you can’t be black, female, politically involved and try to shape the society you live in without angering some people.

When I started speaking out one of the first comments was that I didn’t “know my place”. I’ve known my place my whole life! If you are not white, heterosexual and male, this country suggests you have to be treated differently.

When you’ve gained wealth through slavery and colonialism, you will build courts, police and judiciary based on that system. The problem is when you say such things out loud it sounds as if everyone is being racist on purpose all the time. That’s not true, but the way the society is shaped is racist and divisive.

We want to represent all of Dutch society and our list of candidates alone shows we are truly reflecting the Netherlands. We have equal numbers of men and women. We have gay, lesbian, and transgender candidates. We are normalising what is already normal in society.

We are a new and unconventional voice in society. We are emancipating people and politics.”

The challenging decisions of game development, or how good people can end up making bad games

The following scenario is a work of fiction and not based on any specific game I’ve worked on, or any specific experience I’ve had.

______________________________________________________________

You’re sat in a meeting room with a bunch of other game developers; key representatives from every department that might be affected by animation. There are people from the design team, the engine team, gameplay programmers, AI programmers, the tools team, technical animators, animation programming, the animation director, and a producer. The meeting is about the future of your animation technology.

It’s relatively early in your project; the third game in a successful series, and the animation department wants to do a major upgrade to the core animation technology. Their argument is simple: The animation team has been using the same tools and tech for the last two games, and they’re concerned that if the animation technology isn’t improved, the animation will start to look bad compared to your competitors. There have been some minor improvements since the first game in the series, but no real major steps forward. Since the original tech was created, the rest of the industry has made some pretty major breakthroughs in animation technology; breakthroughs that this team would like to try and implement.

The big problem: The new technology is a paradigm shift. There’s no easy way to convert all the old animations and game code over to the new system, so doing this big upgrade to the animation tech, means pushing the reset button on all the gameplay and AI systems that were built for the last two games. Everything will have to be built up again from scratch.

It’s your job to decide whether or not they should do it.

The producer is the first to chime in…

“How long do you think it’s going to take to get the gameplay and AI back into a state where we can start playtesting and building levels?”

“I’m pretty confident that in 6 months we’ll be good to go”, says the animation programmer.

“Well… 6 months to do the tech and tools… it’ll be maybe another 6 months on top of that to rebuild each of the game systems to get things back to where they were”, offers up one of the technical animators. “I still think it’s worth it though. Once we have the new tech, it’s going to make producing new features way faster than before.”

“You have to bear in mind”, says the Animation Director, “What we did on the last game is pretty much hitting the ceiling of our current technology. It was a real strain on the team. I really don’t want to go through that again on this one.”

“I’ll be honest, I have some concerns”.

Everyone looks towards the lead engine programmer.

“I thought the whole point of this next game was to try and push the cooperative experience. That’s what the directors said was their number one priority”, he nods towards the game director, “And I thought the publisher had already signed off on that. Weren’t they saying that’s what they were most excited about?”

“We can’t do both?”, says the game director.

“We’re probably going to have to rework a whole lot of the systems anyway if we’re going to make them replicate properly over the network,” says the lead gameplay programmer. “The first two games weren’t really built with that in mind. It could be a good time to do this as well since we’ll be rewriting a bunch of the systems anyway. That said, it does add to our workload.”

“And for you guys?”, the producer asks the lead AI programmer.

“It’s pretty much the same situation as gameplay”, she replies, “It’s a lot to take on. I have to say, I think 12 months is optimistic. Things always come up that we don’t expect. I’d say closer to 18 months. I mean… remind me, when are we supposed to be shipping again?”

“We’re aiming for 2 years from now”, says the producer.

“Well if it ends up being 18 months, there’s no way my team can work with that”, adds the lead level designer. “We can rough some things out, but gameplay needs to be solidified a lot earlier than that.”

“Well we could build the new system in parallel with the old system, and let people switch between the two”, says the animation programmer. “That way you can start building levels with the old systems, and we’ll switch it over further down the line when the new systems are in a better shape. It’s a bit more challenging to do it that way, but it’s doable. Honestly though, when I say 6 months for my stuff, I mean 6 months. I can get most of it up and running in 3, but I’m saying 6 to give us a buffer.”

“And how confident are you about the extra 6 months for building out the game systems”, the producer asks the technical animator.

“Reasonably… I mean it’s tough to say… it’s new technology. I’ve got nothing to refer to cause we’ve never done this approach before”, they reply, “6 months is my ballpark estimate, it could be 4, it could be 12. We’ll have a much better idea once the core tech is done and we start working on the first systems. Bear in mind, it’s not like we’d have nothing until that 12 months is up. Systems will be gradually coming online as we go. We’ll get core movement done in the first few weeks.”

“I’d feel much more confident about it if we had another technical animator on the team”, says the animation director.

“I’ll ask if that’s possible but we’re close to our headcount limit, and tech animators aren’t the easiest to hire, so I wouldn’t count on it”, says the producer. “Remind me again, what we’ll be gaining for all this work?”

“It’ll be much faster for us to put animations into the game, and then easier for us to tweak and bug fix them”, says the technical animator. “In general, faster iteration time should also mean the quality of the animation will go up. Basically, it’ll be easier for everyone to do their best work.”

“I think we all want that, but it’s a lot of risk to take on with only a 2 year timeline”, says the lead engine programmer, “there are other teams besides animation who are also proposing some pretty ambitious tech goals as well. We’d maybe have to make some concessions there if we want to go with this”.

“Does anyone really think that it’s going to be 2 years though?” says the animation programmer. “Looking at the scope of this game, it’s probably going to end up closer to 3, with or without the animation system”.

“I can only tell you what I’m being told now, but the publisher seems pretty adamant about it being a 2 year project”, says the producer.

“So what are we going to do about this? Are we going to push ahead with this or not? What’s the call?”

______________________________________________________________

This is what game development is like.

Should the team go with the new animation system? Everyone makes good points. It’s a tough call. You have to think about the people in the room: How confident are you in the projections of each person? Are some people known for being overly ambitious? Are others known for being too conservative? How much is the value of the new animation system versus the cost of building it? How many extra-people will you be able to get to work on it? Will other departments suffer if you put development effort here? Will the game really come out in two years, or is it more?

In one potential future, you decide to go ahead with the new animation system. Things are rocky at the beginning, but with a some hard work and late nights, the animation programmer and technical animators manage to hit their estimates without too much disruption to other teams. The game scores highly, and is praised in particular for it’s strong animation.

In another potential future, you go ahead with the new animation system and it’s a train wreck. The animation programmer was low-balling their estimates because they were excited about working on the new system, and expected the release date to be knocked back a year (it wasn’t). The technical animators were genuine when they gave their estimates but didn’t account for the complexity of making the same systems work in an online cooperative game; something they’d never done before. The difficulties with the animation system caused problems for other teams, especially for the designers, who had a tough time making fun systems and levels, as bugs in the animation system made it difficult for them to play the game throughout development.

Another potential future has the team saying no to the new animation system. It ends up that even without the new animation system, the scope really was too big in other areas, and the game ends up being released after 3 years instead of 2. By the time the game is released, the animation does look horribly outdated, despite the best efforts of the animation team. The issue is specifically called out in reviews.

Then there’s the future where the team says no to the new system, making it much easier for the team to hit the 2 year deadline. It’s a struggle, but the animation team is still able to produce some decent results, and it turns out gamers were more interested in the new cooperative features anyway, leading to great reviews and great sales.

On any game there are a thousand calls like this. Some are big, some are small, and many can lead to the success or failure of your game.

The process of making a game has so many moving parts it’s incredibly difficult to to account for every eventuality. It’s about the technology you’re working with, it’s about your ideas and your ability to execute on them, it’s about what the rest of the market is doing, and most of all it’s about the people on your team: Who they are, how they work, and what else might be going on in their lives.

The point here, and stop me if you’ve heard this one before, is that making games is really fucking hard. You’re faced with so many of these kinds of decisions, the answers to which are highly subjective. It’s likely not every person in the meeting room comes to a consensus, and when a game comes out with some aspect that players don’t enjoy, more often than not there were a whole lot of people on the dev team that argued for the exact same thing that the players are arguing for.

It’s been said many a time before, but it’s true nonetheless: No-one sets out to make a bad game. In the cases where someone on your team was faced with one of these difficult subjective decisions, and made a bad call, they agonize over it. If you have empathy, you look at that decision and say, “That’s not necessarily a bad developer. It was a tough call. It could have gone either way, and it could have just as easily have been me”.

Of course, this doesn’t mean that gamers shouldn’t still be free to critique the games they spent their hard-earned money on. At the end of the day, it’s our job to entertain. Just please, remember that games are made by real people who are running a gauntlet of very challenging problems. 

The answer to “why did this game suck?” isn’t always as simple as “because the developer sucks”, or the even more cringe-worthy “they were just lazy”: It’s because making games is really fucking hard.