system built

anonymous asked:

What would happen if Lotor found the Little Lance game? (Would his little lance kidnapped Little Keith? =C )

Oh dear! I’m not sure if the Galra Empire would allow such things into their ranks, since it’s most likely getting spread around through the Voltron alliance planets, but if Lotor were to see it, I’d imagine running a virus on it would be a plan to infiltrate the alliance in a way.

But I hope you don’t mind me keeping this lighthearted. I don’t think my heart can bear hurting the Little Lances and Keith too much ( ;∀;). So let’s just imagine the Little Lances and Keith find that there are little fluffy virus Galras suddenly appearing in their consoles + the ship system (since Pidge built a connection so they’re free to go there when they need to meaning the Little Galras find a way to get in too) and they have their own little adventure battling the Little virus Galras and saving the day! ゚(๑•̀ㅂ•́)و✧ And everyone gets treated to a ton of garlic knots and cheese pizzas as rewards by their owners!

Relationships are scary and complicated ONLY when you start thinking of your partner as some kind of adversary. 

You know how to stop being scared of relationships? Remember that it’s got a goddamn buddy system *built in*. That’s all a relationship IS: “Let’s approach life with the buddy system.”

Check on your buddy. Make sure your buddy doesn’t forget their lunch box on the schoolbus. Hold hands with your buddy so you don’t get lost. If your buddy wants to look at the monkey cage, look at the goddamn monkey cage with them. If you are the one looking at the monkey cage, ask your buddy what they want to do next, and when they want to feed the giraffe, help them find a quarter for the little food dispenser. Be a good buddy, and if your buddy isn’t a good one too, tell the teacher and ask for a new one.

This isn’t fucking rocket science, people. 

  • Do not forget Michael Brown
  • Do not forget how the media dehumanized him and tried to justify his murder
  • Do not forget how peaceful protests were painted as savage riots
  • Do not forget police armed with military grade weapons terrorized and arrested black civilians
  • Do not forget Darren Wilson being awarded over $200,000 in fundraiser donations for murdering an unarmed black child
  • Do not forget that this system was not built to defend us, but to control us
  • Do not forget Ferguson 

STEM fields don’t need to be ultra competitive monocultures that work people to the bone and systematically drive out anyone who is seen as not being able to hack it.

Just because the system is set up in a way that fosters a super high stress lifestyle doesn’t mean that it needs to be that way. There’s nothing inherently competitive about science (except evolution).

Grad school, and STEM in general, should be intellectually difficult but not nearly as emotionally difficult as it is, and yet way too many people just accept it because that’s they way it’s always been.

I’m not saying it should be easy, but we shouldn’t have to sacrifice out mental and emotional well beings, anything resembling a personal life, or just a somewhat normal work/life balance at the altar of Science. 

The pressure cooker environment of grad school and science in general is both unnecessary and bad for science. It self selects for a certain type of scientist and drives out anyone who varies from the norm. 

But the people in charge aren’t incentivized to change it because they’re products of the system. They are the very type of people who the system was built to serve. When people fail they shrug and say it was unfortunate but not everyone was cut out for this life. 

That is bullshit. You do not have to be broken down and built back up to be a good scientist. Science is not war. We are not soldiers. We are curious, creative people who want to understand the universe. 

We need to stop trying to patch the leaky pipeline and rather build a new pipeline. One that isn’t coated with acid and pressurized beyond the point of failure.

8

So if at times I seem overprotective of the system that we’ve built, if I worry that the resentments of others might disrupt it, I have good reason.

#what elementary did with it’s 100th episode was a testament to the kind of show is #to the kind of show #the kind of holmes adaptation - it has tried to be from the start #what they chose to do with their milestone episode is the epitome of all the ways it stands in stark contrast to any other adaptation #any other show not just any other sherlock adaptation but any other crime procedural would have pulled out the big guns #and dealt their lead/s a huge case and packed it full of guest stars or notable minor characters #for sherlock stories specifically no one could begrudge you for assuming moriarty would play a key role #but that has never been what drives elementary #the 100th episode offered all it’s emotional significance to what has always been the core of the show #that sherlock is better because of the people he surrounds himself with #that there is no true reward in playing the lone genius cut off from society/humanity #and his partnership with joan is the finest exemplar of that #yes the bit with marcus in the opening was nice #and gregson’s little speech at the end pulled at my heart strings #both because of it narrative significance and the subtext of it being written for the cast and crew’s dedication to the show bts #but it always comes back to this #one holmes #one watson #the single fact that elementary is fundamentally about sherlock valuing human connections and interpersonal relationships #over solving the puzzle #will forever set it apart from any other sherlock adaptation #and that might be a criticism for some #but it will forever be one of the key reasons that i cherish and adore it

just because it happened at school doesn’t mean it wasnt abuse, doesnt mean it wasnt trauma. teachers, students, administration…all of those can cause legitimate trauma.

it’s incredibly easy for people to get off the hook with abuse at school because the punishment system is he said/she said and the administrator’s word is final. its a system built to wipe records and take advantage of underprivileged students. school can be horribly traumatizing for some kids and their experiences should be validated, not continually swept under the carpet.

Take a Virtual Tour of NASA

Welcome to NASA! Today, we’re taking you behind-the-scenes for a virtual tour looking at our cutting-edge work and humanity’s destiny in deep space!

Starting at 1:30 p.m., we will host a series of Facebook Live events from each of our 10 field centers across the country. Take a look at where we’ll be taking you…

Glenn Research Center
1:30 p.m. EDT

Our Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, OH will host a tour of its Electric Propulsion Lab. This lab is where we test solar propulsion technologies that are critical to powering spacecraft for our deep-space missions. The Electric Propulsion Laboratory houses two huge vacuum chambers that simulate the space environment.

Marshall Space Flight Center
1:50 p.m. EDT

Our Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, AL will host a tour from a Marshall test stand where structural loads testing is performed on parts of our Space Launch System rocket. Once built, this will be the world’s most powerful rocket and will launch humans farther into space than ever before.

Stennis Space Center
2:10 p.m. EDT

Our Stennis Space Center in Bay St. Louis, MS will take viewers on a tour of their test stands to learn about rocket engine testing from their Test Control Center.

Armstrong Flight Research Center
2:30 p.m. EDT 

Our Armstrong Flight Research Center in Edwards, CA will host a tour from their aircraft hangar and Simulator Lab where viewers can learn about our X-Planes program. What’s an X-Plane? They are a variety of flight demonstration vehicles that are used to test advanced technologies and revolutionary designs.

Johnson Space Center
2:50 p.m. EDT

Our Johnson Space Center in Houston, TX will take viewers on a virtual exploration trip through the mockups of the International Space Station and inside our deep-space exploration vehicle, the Orion spacecraft!

Ames Research Center
3:10 p.m. EDT

Our Ames Research Center in California’s Silicon Valley will bring viewers into its Arc Jet Facility, a plasma wind tunnel used to simulate the extreme heat of spacecraft atmospheric entry.

Kennedy Space Center
3:30 p.m. EDT

Our Kennedy Space Center in Florida will bring viewers inside the Vehicle Assembly Building to learn about how we’re preparing for the first launch of America’s next big rocket, the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket.

Langley Research Center
3:50 p.m. EDT

Our Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia will bring viewers inside its 14-by-22-foot wind tunnel, where aerodynamic projects are tested.

Goddard Space Flight Center
4:10 p.m. EDT

Our Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, MD will discuss the upcoming United States total solar eclipse and host its tour from the Space Weather Lab, a large multi-screen room where data from the sun is analyzed and studied.

Jet Propulsion Laboratory
4:30 p.m. EDT

Our Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, CA will bring viewers to the Spacecraft Assembly Facility to learn about robotic exploration of the solar system.

So, make sure to join us for all or part of our virtual tour today, starting at 1:30 p.m. EDT! Discover more about the work we’re doing at NASA and be sure to ask your questions in the comment section of each Facebook Live event! 

Additional details and viewing information available HERE

Make sure to follow us on Tumblr for your regular dose of space: http://nasa.tumblr.com

“The Basics”

The basic structure of the sortinghatchats system is that you aren’t just sorted into one House, but into two tiers of Houses: Primary and Secondary. Your Primary House defines WHY you do things. Your Secondary defines HOW. To build this system, we’ve drawn on the Sorting Hat’s songs, general HP canon, extracanonical data (ex. interviews with JKR)… and then extrapolated.

People are complex– for joy or for utility, due to social pressure or careless recreation, people often use the reasoning or methods of Houses that aren’t their Primary or Secondary. We call this “modelling” or “performing” a house and we will explain it in greater detail later. These additional layers help us capture some complexities in characters that we couldn’t get using Primary and Secondary alone. People can vary hugely in how they embody their Houses; in this system, Aang, the heroic pacifist protagonist from Avatar the Last Airbender, shares most of his Houses with HP’s Lord Voldemort.

The way you decide which Houses are yours is not necessarily by looking at what you do, but at what would make you proudest and most content if you were strong enough to do it. Your sorting is what you want to be and what you believe you should do, whether or not you actually live up to it. That’s how people like Peter Pettigrew can end up in Gryffindor.

PRIMARIES

Your Primary is your why. It’s your motivations, your values, and the way you frame the world around you. It’s how and what you prioritize, and what you weigh most heavily when making your decisions. People often also assume that others share those priorities. A common response to our system is “but you must oversort into Gryffindor/Slytherin/Ravenclaw/Hufflepuff–everyone has that type of morality, deep down!”

Gryffindor Primaries trust their moral intuitions and have a need and a drive to live by them. They feel what’s right in their gut, and that matters and guides them. If they don’t listen to and act on that, it feels immoral.

We call Gryffindor morality “felt” but that doesn’t mean they’re all impetuous, emotional hellions. Gryffindors can still be intelligent, deliberate creatures who weigh their decisions and moralities carefully. Reasoning, intellectualizing and debate can be support for a Gryffindor’s felt morality– but those things can never make a fully satisfying morality in themselves. Some things are just wrong, no matter what pretty words you use to explain them.

Ravenclaw Primaries have a constructed system that they test their decisions against before they feel comfortable calling something right. This system might be constructed by them, or it might have been taught to them as children, or it might have been discovered by them some point later in life. But it gives them a way to frame the world and a confidence in their ability to interact with it morally.

Ravenclaws do not lack an intuitive sense of morality or gut feeling about things, but they distrust those instincts and have a need to ignore or to dig down deep and dissect those internal moral impulses. Living within their built moral system is as important to a Ravenclaw as to a Gryffindor; it’s the source of the morality that differs between them–what they trust.

Hufflepuff Primaries value people–all people. They value community, they bond to groups (rather than solely individuals), and they make their decisions off of who is in the most need and who is the most vulnerable and who they can help. They value fairness because every person is a person and feel best when they give everyone that fair chance. Even directly wronged, a Hufflepuff will often give someone a second (or fifth) chance.

This doesn’t mean all Hufflepuffs are inherently tolerant human beings, any more than all Gryffindors are inherently good, moral creatures. Hufflepuffs tend to believe that all people deserve some type of kindness, decency, or consideration from them–but they can define “person” however they want, excluding individuals or even whole groups.

Slytherin Primaries are fiercely loyal to the people they care for most. Slytherin is the place where “you’ll make your real friends”– they prioritize individual loyalties and find their moral core in protecting and caring for the people they are closest to.

Slytherin’s reputation for ambition comes from the visibility of this promotion of the self and their important people– ambition is something you can find in all four Houses; Slytherin’s is just the one that looks most obviously selfish.

Because their morality system of “me and mine first” is fairly narrow in scope, Slytherins often construct a secondary morality system to deal with situations that are not addressed by their loyalty system.

SECONDARIES

Your Secondary is your how. It’s how you approach the world as a person interacting with it, and how you make your way. It’s how you problem-solve. It’s not necessarily what you’re best at, or even what’s the most useful to you, but about what skills and methods you value as being intrinsic to you. Do you improvise, do you plan? Do you work on something a little bit every day? Do you charge into the fray and tell people exactly what’s on your mind? What do you do? How would you describe the way you meet the world?

Note: the term “Secondary” is not meant to imply that how you do things is any less important than why (the Primary House). It’s simply the way our terminology fell out and we’re too lazy to change it. The importance of motivations v. methods is a personal sliding scale– it’s perfectly valid for a person to identify with their Secondary House over their Primary. (When drawing from canonical sources, we assumed each character likely was in a House that matched to either their Primary or their Secondary. For instance, Harry is in Gryffindor for his heroic Gryffindor Primary, but Ginny Weasley is there for her brash and bold Gryffindor Secondary.)

Gryffindor Secondaries charge. They meet the world head-on and challenge it to do its worst. Gryffindor Secondaries are honest, brash, and bold in pursuit of things they care about. Known for their bravery, it is almost a moral matter to stay true to themselves in any situation that they’re in.

Ravenclaw Secondaries plan. They collect information, they strategize. They have tools. They run hypotheticals and try to plan ahead for things that might come up. They build things (of varying degrees of practicality and actual usefulness) that they can use later– whether that’s an emergency supply pack, a vast knowledge of Renaissance artistic techniques and supplies, or a series of lists and contingency plans. They feel less at home in improvisation and more comfortable planning ahead and taking the time to be prepared.

Hufflepuff Secondaries toil. Their strength comes from their consistency and the integrity of their method. They’re our hard workers. They build habits and systems for themselves and accomplish things by keeping at them. They have a steadiness that can make them the lynchpin (though not usually the leader) of a community. While stereotyped as liking people and being kind (and this version is perhaps a common reality), a Hufflepuff secondary can also easily be a caustic, introverted misanthrope who runs on hard work alone.

Slytherin Secondaries improvise. They are the most adaptive secondary, finding their strength in responding quickly to whatever a situation throws at them. They improvise differently than the Gryffindor Secondary, far more likely to try coming at situations from different angles than to try strong-arming them. They might describe themselves as having different “faces” for different people and different situations, dropping them and being just themselves only when they’re relaxing or feel safe.

But the Journey Continues…

These four basic Primary and Secondary houses are summarized starting places that we use as a basis for further discussion. What are some ways this gets complicated?

Keep reading

8

When you and I first started, I quickly recognized your merits, both as a detective in your own right and in that you facilitated my own process.  I’m better at the work I do because of you.  But over the years, the relative importance of those two values has flipped:  I now value the work that we do, first and foremost, because I do it with you.  So if at times I seem overprotective of the system that we’ve built, if I worry that the resentments of others might disrupt it, I have good reason.

ABOUT ME - 7? FAVE TV SHOWS:  Elementary  (2012- present)

Also, just a reminder that

1) Yes, men do have many gender specific issues. 

2) Those issues are not caused by misandry, or some kind of secret feminist matriarchal conspiracy. 

In a system predominately built by men and run by men, women  are not the source of systematic issues that harm men. 

Yes, we need prison reform. Yes, we need to reevaluate parental roles so that custody is not disproportionately given to women (because the responsibility of parenting is disproportionately expected of women.) Yes, we need to be concerned with genital mutilation for ALL infants, and rape regardless of the victim’s gender. 

Acknowledging that these are problems is not the same thing as asserting Women/Misandrists/Feminists are the cause of these problems. 

Hey so April’s coming up so I thought it’d be good to have some activities to do! I’ve seen other people do these (most notably for me @uniqueaspergirl​ had one that I did a few of last year!) and thought I’d set one up!

Under the cut is a list of the days (also listed in the picture) and descriptions of what each one is because a few words aren’t always the easiest to understand even when you wrote them.

I would like to say first though that - despite me keeping the descriptions of each day mostly positive, negative submissions and additions are absolutely accepted. Everything isn’t sunshine and daisies. Most of the things are general enough that they’ll apply to anyone, but if one doesn’t work for you feel free to treat it as a freebie!

Submit by submitting to the blog directly, tagging us ( in the @ kind of a way) or by tagging it #walkinredinstead (which I checked, it’s empty) and I’ll post and reblog as many as I can!

Keep reading

Humans are Weird

So I’ve been reading a lot of those “Humans are Weird” posts having to do with us and Aliens, and I really love them.

But there’s one thought I’ve had that I haven’t seen other’s talk about before. So here goes.

===============

Humans have developed a comprehensive understanding of the workings of the universe before being able to send themselves to other planets. Now that doesn’t seem strange to humans, because, well, they did it.

But what if an alien race didn’t have the same kind of geniuses humans have? What if there was no equivalent to Einstein, to Reeman, to Gauss, to Newton, even Euclid. 

Humans have explored the universe with just their minds. Imagining first 4 dimensions and then 7, 8, even 10. They’ve developed string theory. quantum mechanics, have scientific theories that are decades, even centuries away from being testable. But they keep exploring, keep thinking, keep imagining, keep yearning to know more. They even developed nuclear fission AND fusion before space flight!

And what if this TOTALLY weirds an alien species out? They’re basically the opposite of humans. Yeah, sure they invented interstellar travel, but for completely different reasons. They were simply hungry for resources. They mined their systems asteroid belt, they built great cities but they didn’t ponder the beginning of the universe, they didn’t figure out it’s age until centuries after they first reached for the stars.

Imagine a human trying to explain their species fascination with the unknown to another species that doesn’t have that same yearning.

For all we know it might be something we might never be able to understand about each other.

We may be the Doc Brown’s of the universe, but it may be only for the sheer fact that we ask, “What’s beyond? How far can we go? Where does the universe start and end? How did we get to here?” And other species aren’t nearly so curious about the universe.

Half of the discoveries made my mathematicians about how geometry works is them going “I wonder if….” or physiciscts going “Hey, what about…?”

And I think that’s really amazing.

“It’s alright to be scared,” the antagonist said. “Fear keeps you alive. It’s an in built warning system.” They prowled closer. “Of course, only so long as you have the right fear response. Some prey freeze because it means a predator won’t see them, and in their heart they know running means they’re dead. Others have to run, when capture means death…” the antagonist moved closer still, gaze fixed on them. “Are you going to run?”

A challenge. The protagonist desperately tried to think what the right answer was - what type of predator they were facing.

The antagonist stepped closer still.

The protagonist bolted, to a pealing laughter behind them.

8

When you and I first started I quickly recognized your merits, both as a detective in your own right and in that you facilitated my own process. I’m better at the work I do because of you. But over the years the relative importance of those two values has flipped. I now value the work that we do, first and foremost, because I do it with you. So if at times I seem overprotective of the system that we’ve built, if I worry that the resentments of others might disrupt it I have good reason.

3

Real life solarpunk: neighborhood microgrid in Brooklyn:

Solar Experiment Lets Neighbors Trade Energy Among Themselves

In a promising experiment in an affluent swath of the borough, dozens of solar-panel arrays spread across rowhouse rooftops are wired into a growing network. Called the Brooklyn Microgrid, the project is signing up residents and businesses to a virtual trading platform that will allow solar-energy producers to sell excess-electricity credits from their systems to buyers in the group, who may live as close as next door.

The project is still in its early stages — it has just 50 participants thus far — but its implications could be far reaching. The idea is to create a kind of virtual, peer-to-peer energy trading system built on blockchain, the database technology that underlies cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin.

(via Solar Experiment Lets Neighbors Trade Energy Among Themselves - The New York Times)

Real life solarpunk: neighborhood microgrid in Brooklyn via @fuckyeahicosahedrons

3

NASA’s Juno Spacecraft Completes Flyby over Jupiter’s Great Red Spot

NASA’s Juno mission completed a close flyby of Jupiter and its Great Red Spot on July 10, during its sixth science orbit.

All of Juno’s science instruments and the spacecraft’s JunoCam were operating during the flyby, collecting data that are now being returned to Earth. Juno’s next close flyby of Jupiter will occur on Sept. 1.

Raw images from the spacecraft’s latest flyby will be posted in coming days.

“For generations people from all over the world and all walks of life have marveled over the Great Red Spot,” said Scott Bolton, principal investigator of Juno from the Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio. “Now we are finally going to see what this storm looks like up close and personal.”

The Great Red Spot is a 10,000-mile-wide (16,000-kilometer-wide) storm that has been monitored since 1830 and has possibly existed for more than 350 years. In modern times, the Great Red Spot has appeared to be shrinking.

Juno reached perijove (the point at which an orbit comes closest to Jupiter’s center) on July 10 at 6:55 p.m. PDT (9:55 p.m. EDT). At the time of perijove, Juno was about 2,200 miles (3,500 kilometers) above the planet’s cloud tops. Eleven minutes and 33 seconds later, Juno had covered another 24,713 miles (39,771 kilometers), and was passing directly above the coiling crimson cloud tops of the Great Red Spot.

The spacecraft passed about 5,600 miles (9,000 kilometers) above the clouds of this iconic feature.

On July 4 at 7:30 p.m. PDT (10:30 p.m. EDT), Juno logged exactly one year in Jupiter orbit, marking 71 million miles (114.5 million kilometers) of travel around the giant planet.

Juno launched on Aug. 5, 2011, from Cape Canaveral, Florida. During its mission of exploration, Juno soars low over the planet’s cloud tops – as close as about 2,100 miles (3,400 kilometers). During these flybys, Juno is probing beneath the obscuring cloud cover of Jupiter and studying its auroras to learn more about the planet’s origins, structure, atmosphere and magnetosphere.

Early science results from NASA’s Juno mission portray the largest planet in our solar system as a turbulent world, with an intriguingly complex interior structure, energetic polar aurora, and huge polar cyclones.

JPL manages the Juno mission for the principal investigator, Scott Bolton, of Southwest Research Institute. The Juno mission is part of the New Frontiers Program managed by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, for the Science Mission Directorate.

Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver, built the spacecraft. JPL is a division of Caltech in Pasadena