syrian refuges

Syria became home to the refugees who fled the armies of Ibrahim Basha in 1839

Syria became home to the Circassian refugees in 1860

Syria became home to the Armenian refugees in 1914

Syria became home to the Palestinian refugees in 1948

Syria became home once again to Palestinian refugees in 1967

Syria became home to the refugees from Kuwait in 1990

Syria became home to refugees from Lebanon in 1996

Syria became home to the refugees from Iraq in 2003

Syria became home to the refugees from Lebanon in 2006

It will be written in the history books and generations will remember, that Syria never closed it’s borders for those who fled their homes seeking safety and refuge.

Syria has never asked any Arab for a visa to enter it’s lands whether it was a visit or permanent stay.

In Syria not a single tent was put up on the borders to accommodate for refugees across the years, houses were opened, streets were vacated and cities were renamed to allow for refugees to feel at home.

Let it be written in the history books and let the generations remember, that when a Syrian needed help and refuge; borders were closed and the world looked away.

—  Yaman Birawi

Syria became home to the refugees who fled the armies of Ibrahim Basha in 1839
Syria became home to the Circassian refugees in 1860
Syria became home to the Armenian refugees in 1914
Syria became home to the Palestinian refugees in 1948
Syria became home once again to Palestinian refugees in 1967
Syria became home to the refugees from Kuwait in 1990
Syria became home to refugees from Lebanon in 1996
Syria became home to the refugees from Iraq in 2003
Syria became home to the refugees from Lebanon in 2006
It will be written in the history books and generations will remember, that Syria never closed it’s borders for those who fled their homes seeking safety and refuge.
Syria has never asked any Arab for a visa to enter it’s lands whether it was a visit or permanent stay.
In Syria not a single tent was put up on the borders to accommodate for refugees across the years, houses were opened, streets were vacated and cities were renamed to allow for refugees to feel at home.
Let it be written in the history books and let the generations remember, that when a Syrian needed help and refuge; borders were closed and the world looked away.
~ Yaman Birawi

What she says: I’m fine.

What she really means: Two thousand Syrian refugees have died trying to cross the Mediterranean to get into the countries that have destabilized their homeland and allowed radicals to take over. Then the same countries turn these desperate people away. When will people with power recognize the humanity of those without it?

As received:

Syria became home to the refugees who fled the armies of Ibrahim Basha in 1839

Syria became home to the Circassian refugees in 1860

Syria became home to the Armenian refugees in 1914

Syria became home to the Palestinian refugees in 1948

Syria became home once again to Palestinian refugees in 1967

Syria became home to the refugees from Kuwait in 1990

Syria became home to refugees from Lebanon in 1996

Syria became home to the refugees from Iraq in 2003

Syria became home to the refugees from Lebanon in 2006

It will be written in the history books and generations will remember, that Syria never closed it’s borders for those who fled their homes seeking safety and refuge.

Syria has never asked any Arab for a visa to enter it’s lands whether it was a visit or permanent stay.

In Syria not a single tent was put up on the borders to accommodate for refugees across the years, houses were opened, streets were vacated and cities were renamed to allow for refugees to feel at home.

Let it be written in the history books and let the generations remember, that when a Syrian needed help and refuge; borders were closed and the world looked away.

Sakher al-Mohammad, 27, journalist: “I can’t remember how my life really was before 2011.”

In Syria, Sakher worked as a journalist and had been critical of the Syrian government. He knows the impact that initiatives and protests can have on public opinion. Days after the assaults, he organized a protest on Facebook, drawing up to 500 participants, he said.

Sakher said he was lucky to be in the country. But not everything has been perfect, Sakher said.

He criticized the country’s refugee camps, saying the government had failed to properly monitor them. According to him, drug use was prevalent in the camps while he was there.

“Even my German friends have started questioning me about the role of refugees in carrying out recent terror attacks,” Sakher said. “I expressed my condolences, but I still think it is unfair to associate me with those people. I fled to Germany to start a new life.”

We’ve been sharing more profiles of Syrian refugees like Sakher. Read more here: These Syrians found refuge in Germany, but they’re still seeking peace.

anonymous asked:

Do u fink dat some humanitarian crises get more attention than others Not playing the oppressionOlympics but from what Ive seen from the media alone the MiddleEast get more attention than the Congo for example even though 6 million have died since98'

100% yes.

I know what you mean by “oppression olympics” but I feel it is also important to point out the quiet, hushed racism that plays a major part in the media watering down the devastation of a crisis in one part of the world, but highlighting another issue some place else.  

With regards to what is being christened as the “latest” refugee crisis in the media emanating from Syria is interesting because Syrian refugees have been fleeing the country since 2011. For 4 years now Syrians have been seeking refuge in neighbouring countries: 

1.8 million refugees fled to Turkey
1.2 million fled to Lebanon
I believe almost 800k fled to Jordan + Yemen 

Millions of Syrians have been fleeing life threatening, devastating, unlivable circumstances for nearly half a decade but only now, in 2015, as the burden only slightly shifts to Europe does it maintain spotlight eligibility. In comparison to the millions of refugees that’ve fled to countries within the MENA region, the number of refugees that Europe has agreed to resettle is minimal. 

But an even more pressing, heartbreaking and disappointing example is how the ongoing refugee crisis faced by Eritreans, Somalis and other refugees from North East/Central Africa is entirelyyyyyyy overlooked. For YEARS Somali refugees living in Dadaab refugee camps have been faced with the hurdles of infectious disease, lack of freedom of movement and an imminent shortage of food. Generations of Somali refugees have been faced with the unimaginable ultimatum of either leaving the camps due to its hostile environment, struggling to seek asylum in countries that have closed their doors to them, or to return to possibly dangerous circumstances in Somalia itself. Eritreans fleeing the country because of severe state-sponsored violence, torture and capital punishment are being returned to the same country they were seeking refuge from. For years these refugees have been making unimaginably difficult journeys crossing/oceans/borders/hostile territories but the attention from media sources has been abysmal. 

To learn more about the plight of Eritrean/Somali refugees 
For a timeline of events leading to the current Syrian refugee situation 

Syria’s history with refugees:
Syria became home to the refugees who fled the armies of Ibrahim Basha in 1839
Syria became home to the Circassian refugees in 1860
Syria became home to the Armenian refugees in 1914
Syria became home to the Palestinian refugees in 1948
Syria became home once again to Palestinian refugees in 1967
Syria became home to the refugees from Kuwait in 1990
Syria became home to refugees from Lebanon in 1996
Syria became home to the refugees from Iraq in 2003
Syria became home to the refugees from Lebanon in 2006
It will be written in the history books and generations will remember, that Syria never closed it’s borders for those who fled their homes seeking safety and refuge.
Syria has never asked any Arab for a visa to enter it’s lands whether it was a visit or permanent stay.
In Syria not a single tent was put up on the borders to accommodate for refugees across the years, houses were opened, streets were vacated and cities were renamed to allow for refugees to feel at home.
Let it be written in the history books and let the generations remember, that when a Syrian needed help and refuge; borders were closed and the world looked away.
—  Noura Redding

Samir, 20, student: “I am sick of the word ‘Syrian’, being such a bad word.”

Tens of thousands of single male refugees are unemployed in Germany — a situation that politicians say could leave the newcomers particularly susceptible to jihadist propaganda or prone to commit crimes.

Born in Damascus, Samir grew up in Saudi Arabia, then moved back to Syria. “Everything was ideal,” he said of returning to his country of origin at that time. The revolution of 2011 changed everything. “We, as a family, supported those chants,” he recalled, referring to the opposition protests.

Samir was determined to graduate from high school despite the growing conflict, but he had become a vocal critic of the Assad-government. When the secret service became aware of his views, Samir’s family urged him to flee.

We’ll be sharing more profiles of Syrian refugees throughout the coming week. Read more here: These Syrians found refuge in Germany, but they’re still seeking peace.

Watch on polisli.tumblr.com

Syrian Refugee Figure Hits 1 Million, UN Says

 

By BARBARA SURK and DAVID RISING 03/06/13

BEIRUT — The number of Syrians who have fled their war-ravaged country and are seeking assistance has now topped the 1 million mark, the U.N. refugee agency said Wednesday, warning that Syria is heading toward a “full-scale disaster.”

The U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees, Antonio Guterres, said in Geneva that the 1 million figure is based on reports from his agency’s field offices in countries neighboring Syria that have provided safe haven for refugees escaping the civil war.

“With a million people in flight, millions more displaced internally, and thousands of people continuing to cross the border every day, Syria is spiraling toward full-scale disaster,” Guterres said. Syria’s population is about 22 million.

In addition, several hundred thousand Syrians who have fled their country have not yet registered as refugees, suggesting the total number well exceeds 1 million, said Adrian Edwards, a spokesman for the U.N. refugee agency. 

thescene

A Syrian Family Finds Refuge on a Swedish Island

The island of Gotland has become home to more than a thousand refugees. After years of forced separation, a family of seven united in the parish of a local priest.

Watch more New Yorker videos. 

election 2016

donald trump appears to be winning, and the lofty first-world americans are trying to flock to other countries as refugees without knowing their cultures, languages, geographies, histories, and politics. its funny how they denied syrians the right to refuge, and now expect other countries to chose them over the syrians and other true refugees.

Between refusing any Syrian immigrants refuge and insisting Muslims in the US wear “IDs” or badges, it’s alarmingly obvious that the Republicans in the US have become dumbass, crazy, sick, callous, hideous people who are utterly beyond help.

Not only are they an embarrassment to America, they’re an embarrassment to the world and humanity in general.

A post I found trending on Facebook:

“New Rule:

If you’re voting for Trump (or a third party candidate to "punish” the DNC) you have to meet with your Gay, Lesbian, Transgender, Black, Muslim and Hispanic friends and explain why your need for spite is more important than their right to live free and happy lives.

You have to look them in the eyes and tell them why your anger at a 238 year old system, that didn’t dramatically change in a few months, is worth more than their safety or security.

You need to meet with every Mother, Father, Sister, Brother and Parent who has lost a loved one to gun violence and tell them why a lack of Bernie supporters at the polls is enough reason to support the RNC’s love affair with guns and their hatred of common sense gun reform.

You have to tell your female friends that you’re furious about Benghazi and other vague incidents that are somehow Hillary’s fault and that the de-funding of Planned Parenthood is worth enduring as long as she isn’t in the White House.

You’ll need to take time away from Pokemon Go and Netflix to talk with the youngest generation of Americans who will live with the legacy of non existent environmental protection that your vote promised them.

You’ll be expected to go door to door and apologize to all the people who will lose their health insurance when President Trump dismantles Obamacare. Access to medical services may be important, but they’ll need to understand you were expecting free college.

You’ll be requested at several LGBTQ events, where we’ll patiently listen to your reasons why you voted for a President whose party just stated they’d work to reverse marriage equality. I would do this one quickly however, before we get too comfortable being treated as human beings, worthy of equality.

Of course, you’ll also need to offer your time checking genitals at bathrooms around the country, as your vote ensures the Right has the political power to continue punishing and demonizing transgender people who simply want to pee.

Your African American friends will most likely expect a solid reason as to why you supported a party that sees no problem with police brutality or the militarization of their local law enforcement. Black Lives Matter, but not nearly as much as your inflexibility.

I’d also prepare a few remarks for the police officers who are currently being targeted, because of a racially divided country fueled by hatred and fear mongering, all originating from the party your vote placed into power.

You’ll also want to start growing your own food, because once President Trump sends his goons to deport “All dem illegals”, you’ll find a remarkably non existent workforce of Americans willing to pick the nation’s food for pennies a day.

This would also be the best time to pick up a few stuffed animals or toys. It’s the least you can give to the immigrant children whose families you’ve ripped apart out of political spite.

I imagine a few mosques would love to sit down with you and hear you pontificate on the ills of “Crooked Hillary” and all the crimes she’s mysteriously never been convicted of and how those transparent crimes are worth chasing down, even it it means the Muslim community continues to get targeted and blamed for the actions of 0.0001% of their religion. (You won’t need to do this for the white mass shooters, as it’s clear they’re acting alone and simply just “sad and depressed.”)

Skype will be a great tool when you need to video chat with the Syrian refuges who have seen their homes and entire lives destroyed by both American and Russian carpet bombing. Language barriers aside, I imagine they’ll understand that your frustration is a fair trade for their entire lives and continued homelessness.

In the end, you won’t have enough time to meet with all these people and it’s probably for the best. Once you start humanizing the people who will be damned by your tantrum, you risk seeing the bigger picture, which only assures your eventual return to reality. Once that starts to happen you’ll be forced to accept that Bernie Sanders was ONLY able to get the DNC to adopt several of his political ideals, because of the tireless efforts of his supporters. Supporters like myself. Supporters like you. You’ll soon realize that few people love Hillary, but they understand their support of her is necessary to ensure the country survives long enough to give Bernie’s policies time to settle in and take off. Suddenly you’ll be forced to admit that political revolutions don’t happen in a year and that dramatic changes are going to take time, time that can’t be allocated to a country torn apart by an egotistical madman with a penchant for spite and revenge. By the time this all happens, you’ll find yourself looking around at this beautiful country, your friends, families and loved ones and you’ll wonder why you ever even considered risking all of this, just because your hatred of a woman was more powerful than your love of country, freedom, humanity and decency. You’ll question your friends who are cursing the man they just recently considered their savior and you’ll have to look at yourself from the outside in. Then it hits you.

Perspective.

This is bigger than you, or me or Bernie Sanders. This isn’t your typical Left vs. Right political nonsense. This is real, this is happening and you can join your fellow men and women in opposition or you can damn the country to trillions in debt, broken NATO agreements, racial hatred, homophobia, war, isolationism and proud ignorance.

What world will you leave for the next generation? What amount of anger is worth destroying everything and empowering the proud intolerance of the know nothing base?

We all get to choose how to shape the future and your choice will forever define the person you are, in the eyes of those around you.

Don’t burn down the farm, because the crop wasn’t what you had hoped. Enrich the land, ensuring an even better crop next season.“

Syria became home to the refugees who fled the armies of Ibrahim Basha in 1839.

Syria became home to the Circassian refugees in 1860.

Syria became home to the Armenian refugees in 1914.

Syria became home to the Palestinian refugees in 1948.

Syria became home once again to Palestinian refugees in 1967.

Syria became home to the refugees from Kuwait in 1990.

Syria became home to refugees from Lebanon in 1996.

Syria became home to the refugees from Iraq in 2003.

Syria became home to the refugees from Lebanon in 2006.

It will be written in the history books and generations will remember, that Syria never closed it’s borders for those who fled their homes seeking safety and refuge.

Syria has never asked any Arab for a visa to enter it’s lands whether it was a visit or permanent stay.

In Syria not a single tent was put up on the borders to accommodate for refugees across the years, houses were opened, streets were vacated and cities were renamed to allow for refugees to feel at home.

Let it be written in the history books and let the generations remember, that when a Syrian needed help and refuge; borders were closed and the world looked away.

- Osama Zein Al-Abeen

Christians of America, allow me, an Atheist, to quote a book for you which explains why we should welcome Syrians to our country as they flee ISIS. This book is one you all claim to know, so why is it that so many of you deny the core message?

Matthew 25:35-40

“For I was hungry and you gave me something to eat, I was thirsty and you gave me something to drink, I was a stranger and you invited me in, I needed clothes and you clothed me, I was sick and you looked after me, I was in prison and you came to visit me.’

Then the righteous will answer him, ‘Lord, when did we see you hungry and feed you, or thirsty and give you something to drink? When did we see you a stranger and invite you in, or needing clothes and clothe you? When did we see you sick or in prison and go to visit you?’

The King will reply, ‘Truly I tell you, whatever you did for one of the least of these brothers and sisters of mine, you did for me.”

That quote is from your Bible, and is a story Jesus, a Middle Eastern man himself, tells followers to explain how God will one day separate the true believers from the false. You can go to church this Sunday and be the first one in the door, you can be the one praying the loudest, you can be the one everyone looks to as an ideal Christian… But if you dare deny innocent Syrians refuge, you are nothing but a fraud. Your irrational and prejudice fears do not revoke the words you claim to live by.

Tamara Nahar, 26, artist: “Some refugees don’t even get the chance to speak to Germans.”

Tamara Nahar smiled as she stood in front of the painting that decided her fate.

It was of a shirt hanging upside down, with blood appearing to drip toward the lower end of the frame. She painted it in 2013 when she was still living in Syria, after a friend told her that soldiers had hung him upside down and beaten him.

Tamara paid a price for turning those memories into art: She was arrested and briefly detained.

But standing next to that painting this spring in Berlin, Tamara said she had no regrets.

When Syria tumbled into civil war, her work started to become more political — and that brought more risks. Her professors at Damascus University, where she was pursuing a master’s degree, grew hostile toward her. But Tamara continued to organize art exhibitions.

We’ll be sharing more profiles of Syrian refugees throughout the coming week. Read more here: These Syrians found refuge in Germany, but they’re still seeking peace.