swahili tanzania

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You know what I love? 
Names. 
You know what I love more than just names? 
Geographically accurate names.

(Current popular names all over the world)

The following information was found here

Names From The Ancient World

  • Eastern
  • Egypt
  • Greece
  • Rome
  • Africa

Medieval European Names
Medieval English Names

Anglo-Saxon/Old English Names

  • Dithematic Names (Name with two elements)
  • Monothematic Names (Single element names & bynames)
  • Religion (Gods; Goddesses; Calendar)
  • Rulers

CELTIC

  • Ireland 
    [Celtic-Male Origin | Celtic-Female Origin | More]
  • Scotland 
    [Naming Patterns | Celtic Origin | Biblical Origin | More]
  • Wales 
    [Naming Practices | Biblical Origin | Welsh Surnames | More]
  • Brittany 
    [Male | Female | Surnames | More]
  • Old Celtic 
    [Male | Female | Religion | Cornwall | Isle of Man | More]

Modern English First Names

  • The Central Stock of English First Names
  • Linknames (feminine forms of Biblical, Celtic, germanic, Greek, Latin and Modern male names)
  • Saints (calendar of saints, patron saints)
  • Modern Coinages
    Placenames | Blended | Combined | Borrowed Words | Unisex
  • Surname Adaptations (English, Scottish, Irish, Welsh and Foreign surnames used as first names)
  • Themed Names (twins, mulit-births, colors, creatures dates, etc)
  • More

Western European Names

  • France | Naming Practices | Medieval | More
  • Italy | Latin | Medieval | More
  • Germany | Naming Practices | Medieval | More
  • Austria | First Names | Surnames | Rulers
  • Switzerland | First Names | Surnames
  • Netherlands | Naming Practices | Friesland | More
  • Belgium | Naming Practices | Walloon | More
  • Spain | Catalonia | Aragon | Asturias | Galicia | More
  • Portugal | Biblical Origin | Latin Origin | More
  • Basque | Male | Female | Surnames

Eastern European Names

  • Poland | Slavonic Origin | Various | More
  • Hungary | Pronunciation etc | Names | More
  • Czech-Slovak | Czech | Slovak | Czechoslovakia | More
  • Albania | Male | Female | Surnames
  • Bulgaria | First Names | Surnames | More
  • Romania | Male | Female | Surnames
  • Former Yugoslavia
    Former Yugoslavia | Bosnia-Hercegovina | Croatia | Macedonia | Montenegro | Serbia | Slovenia
  • Greece | Greek Origin | Latin Origin | Surnames | More

Scandinavian Names

  • Old Norse | Male | Female | Name Elements | More
  • Norway | Norse Origin | Germanic Origin | Surnames | More
  • Sweden | Norse Origin | Germanic Origin | Surnames | More
  • Denmark | Norse Origin | Various Origin | Surnames | More
  • Iceland | Norse Origin | Various Origin | Surnames | More
  • Faroe Islands | Norse Origin | Foreign Origin | Surnames
  • Finland | Pronunciation | Religion | Finnish | Compounds | More

Former Soviet Union Names

  • Russia | Naming Practices | Slavic Origin | Surnames | More
  • Europe and the Caucasus 
    Ukraine | Belarus | Moldavia | Georgia | Armenia | Azerbaijan | Caucasus
  • Baltic States
    Estonia | Latvia | Lithuania | Finland
  • Asian Republics
    Kazakhstan | Tajikistan | Turkmenistan | Uzbekistan | Kirghizistan 

African Names

  • Northern Africa | Gen. Names
    Morocco | Algeria | Tunisia | Libya | Egypt | Western Sahara 
  • Eastern Africa | Gen. Names
    Sudan | Ethiopia | Eritrea | Somalia | Djibouti | Uganda | Burundi | Rwanda | Kenya | Tanzania | Swahili 
  • Central Africa | Gen. Names
    Chad | Central African Republic | Cameroon | Equatorial Guinea | Gabon | Congo | Democratic Republic of Congo 
  • Western Africa | Gen. Names
    Mauritania | Mali | Burkina Fasu | Senegal | Gambia | Guinea-Bissau | Guinea | Sierra Leone | Liberia | Ivory Coast | Ghana | Togo | Benin | Niger | Nigeria 
  • Southern Africa | Gen. Names
    Angola | Zambia | Zimbabwe | Malawi | Mozambique | Namibia | Botswana | South Africa | Lesotho | Swaziland
  • African Islands
    Madagascar | Comoro Islands | Mauritius | Cape Verde Islands | Seychelles | Sao Tome and Principe 

Northern Native American Names

  • Native names used in modern America
  • Various Native American Nations
  • Algonquin [Cheyenne, Shawnee, Mohican/Mahican]
  • Apache [Mimbreno, Warm Springs, White Mountain, Bedonkohe, Chiricahua]
  • Iroquois [Cayuga, Mohawk, Oneida, Onundagas, Seneca, Tuscaroa]
  • Ojibwa [Ojibway, Potawatomi, Chippewa]
  • Cherokee | Choctaw | Creek | Crow | Hopi | Kiowa | Miwok | Navajo | Nez Perce | Omaha | Osage | Seminole | Sioux | Yakima
  • Inuit

Southern and Central Native American Names

  • Aztec [History, Male, Female, Religion, Calendars, Rulers]
  • Inca [Male, Female, Religion, Calendars]
  • Maya [History, Male, Female, Religion, Calendars]
  • Amazonian [Names from tribes living in the rain forests]

India

  • Hindu Names
    Male Names [A | B | C - K | L- Z] | Female | More
  • Hindu Gods
  • Sikh
  • Others

Middle and Near Eastern 

  • Arab/Muslim
    Male | Female | More
  • East
    Iran | Turkey | Kurds | Pakistan | Bangladesh | Afghanistan
  • Jewish Names
    Biblical | Yiddish | Modern | Various | Surnames

  • China 
    Info | Male | Female  
  • Japan 
    Info | Male | Female
  • Korea 
    Info | Male | Female
  • Mongolia
  • Himalayan 
    Nepal | Bhutan | Tibet
  • Indochina 
    Burma | Thailand | Vietnam | Cambodia | Laos
  • South East Asia 
    Indonesia | Malaysia | Brunei | The Philippines

Pacific 

  • Polynesia
    Maori | Samoa | Tonga | French Polynesia | Fiji | Cook Islands | Easter Island | Hawai'i | Australia
  • Micronesia
    Federated States of Micronesia | Kirbati | Marashall Islands | Marianas Islands and Guam | Nauru | Belau
  • Melanesia
    Soloman Islands | Papua New Guinea | Vanuatu | Tuvalu
Stone Town, Zanzibar - Tanzania


Stone Town is a city rich in East African history, culture, and the arts. Its architecture, mostly dating back to the 19th century, reflects the diverse influences underlying the Swahili culture, with the East African culture being preeminent, there is a unique mixture of Arab, Persian, Indian and European elements. The name Stone Town comes from the ubiquitous use of coral stone to construct many of the buildings.

anonymous asked:

Do you have any images of the henna designs used and how they vary across different ethnic groups? I'm familiar with henna and my Indian neighbour taught me her traditions around it and applied some designs to me when I was a curious child and she was getting ready for a wedding, but I would assume designs very considerably between cultures as well as the context in which they are used. Would you be able to direct me to info on this? Thanks :)

You’re absolutely right — henna designs vary considerably from region to region… I often post pictures about it if you look through my henna tag. Here are some examples of different styles:

This is the style traditionally done in much of Morocco, known today simply as “bildi” (’rustic’ or ‘old-fashioned’)… Commonly associated with the “Imperial Cities” of Fes, Meknes, and Marrakech, it shares many similarities with the traditional embroidery (terz) of that region — note the division of space into diamonds and triangles, the use of parallel lines, and the toothed edging. Photo taken by me in Fes, 2014:

This is another style seen in Morocco, in the southern regions and Sahara. This “Sahrawi” style shares some elements with the henna of central and northern Morocco, but is similar in layout to the henna done in Mauritania. Photo from Flickr:

The henna of Mauritania is breathtakingly unique and immediately recognizable. In my opinion the henna artists of Mauritania are among the most talented and technically accomplished in the world; designs were traditionally done in reverse with a tape resist, and today they are also drawn (there’s actually a whole book about it!). Photo from Flickr:

And West Africa has its own style as well, commonly seen in Mali, Nigeria, Senegal, and other places in the region — done in reverse with tape, like in Mauritania, but with longer lines and different layouts. Photo by Casey McMenemy, from my article on henna in West Africa:

There is also a unique and recognizable style in East Africa, on the Swahili Coast (Kenya, Tanzania, etc.). Unfortunately today they often use the dangerous “black henna” chemical dye, but as you can see it can be easily replicated with natural henna (from this article on henna on the Swahili Coast):

The countries of the Arabian Peninsula have their own set of styles too, known as khaleeji (“Gulf”), which are today immensely popular around the world (even in places like Morocco and India which have their own longstanding traditions of henna design). In the Khaleej itself there are many henna salons with local and international artists, and so the designs are constantly evolving; the constant, for me, is the open layout and the contrast between thick and thin. Here’s an example of some contemporary khaleeji-style work (from Instagram):

Of course, Persia was once the heartland of henna, and in the Safavid period we have many depictions of beautiful, elaborate henna patterns in illustrated manuscripts. While the tradition died out during the Qajar period under the influence of Western fashion, it is clear that there was once a “Persian style” of henna, which some artists have attempted to continue or revive. This is a (very zoomed-in) detail from Mir Sayyid Ali’s 1540 masterpiece “A Nomadic Encampment” (and for more on Persian henna, see this article):

And while India came rather late to the henna-pattern game, developing traditions of henna art only in the 18th-19th century, by the 20th century South Asia had become one of the centres of henna art worldwide, and the henna styles from the region are probably the most common and recognizable today. That’s not to say that they were always what we think of today as “Indian-style” henna — here’s an example of Rajasthani designs from the 1950s recorded by Jogendra Saksena, which are quite different than the style of henna common in India today:

Not to mention the fact that within the Indian subcontinent, there are (or have been, historically) distinct regional styles: Pakistani, Marwari, Rajasthani, and more… And of course, henna designs are constantly changing! What was popular and stylish twenty years ago is not the same as what was popular ten years ago, or what is popular now. Especially with the interconnectedness of the internet, artists around the world are able to learn from each other, spread innovations, and merge styles in new and exciting ways.

Compare this old-fashioned, recognizably Pakistani-style design (from Flickr):

To the contemporary work of Pakistani-American artist (and dear friend of mine) Sabreena Haque, who combines motifs and layouts from Indian, Pakistani, Gulf, and Moroccan patterns, along with inspiration from many other areas of art and nature (from her Instagram):

And there’s so much more to explore! There seems to be a unique style of henna patterns in the Balkans, similar to their tattooing and embroidery. What were henna designs like in medieval Spain? Yemenite Jews had their own unique patterns and techniques as well, which still need more research. And there’s more to say about the evolution of henna designs in Morocco too!

I could go on and on, but perhaps that’s enough for now. Let me know if I can answer any other questions!

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Cafe Africa (Regal Plaza, Cross Roads, Jamaica) :: Jamaica’s only place for Authentic African Cuisine. This restaurant is the brain child of Steven Golding and his wife, Emprezz.

5 things about me

I was tagged by @thorinarkenstoned​ to do this, Thank you :)

five thing you will find in my bag

  • wallet
  • a book to read
  • Waterbottle
  • pens
  • receipts

five things in my bedroom

  • clothes
  • non functional TV
  • Frames
  • a basketball
  • Bed!

five things i have always wanted to do in my life

  • travel even more
  • being able to graduate school (this time I will)
  • Volunteer more
  • Having Enough money to be able to live debt free forever, travel, help my family and friends when they need and also spoil them
  • learn at least 7 other languages (and I will)

five things that make me happy

  • Music
  • books
  • Family
  • friends
  • LIFE
  • extra one: TRAVEL

five things on my to-do list

  • travel
  • meet strangers
  • learn languages
  • Travel
  • TRAVEL

five things people may not know about me

  • I speak a tiny little bit of swahili
  • I lived in Tanzania for 3 months, volunteering
  • lived in London UK for a year
  • Never been to the USA though I live in Canada, but I plan on changing that
  •  French is my first language? (though I think this one is super obvious)

i’ll tag people and disregard if you’ve already done this : @minhyriath @freaky-ghost @blodbranddod @theweirdgirlthatlikesmetal @mirror-sword-and-shield @ebbandflow again, only if you feel like it :)

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Kangas, top to bottom:

1. Inscription reads ‘Welcome stranger’. Kenya, early 21st century

2. Inscription reads 'We young people declare war against HIV and AIDs because we have the capacity and the will to do it’. Tanzania, early 21st century

3. 'A wedding is a joyous occasion to be enjoyed by all’. Tanzania, early 21st century.

4.  'You left the door open, so the cat ate the doughnut; what are you going to do about it, tenant?’. Zanzibar, Tanzania, 1960s.

Towns and ports involved in the Arab slave trade

The 1st wave of the Arab Slave trade involved the following towns and ports

North Africa

  1. Tangier (Morocco)
  2. Marrakesh (Morocco)
  3. Algiers (Algeria)
  4. Tripoli (Libya)
  5. Cairo (Egypt)
  6. Aswan (Egypt

West Africa:

  1. Aoudaghost (Mauritania)
  2. Timbuktu (Mali)
  3. Gao (Mali)
  4. Bilma (Niger)
  5. Kano (Nigeria)

Central Africa

  1. Democratic Republic of Congo
  2. Burundi

East Africa and Swahili Coast:

  1. Bagamoyo (Tanzania)
  2. Zanzibar (Tanzania)
  3. Kilwa (Tanzania)
  4. Sofala (Beira, Mozambique)
  5. Mombasa (Kenya)
  6. Rwanda

Horn of Africa:

  1. Assab (Eritrea)
  2. Massawa (Eritrea)
  3. Nefasit (Eritrea)
  4. Zeila (Somalia)
  5. Mogadishu (Somalia)
  6. Kismayo (Somalia)

Arabian Peninsula:

  1. Zabīd (Yemen)
  2. Muscat (Oman)
  3. Aden (Yemen)
  4. Socotra (Indian Ocean)

Indian Ocean:

  1. Debal (Sindh, Pakistan)
  2. Karachi (Sindh, Pakistan)
  3. Janjira (India)
  4. Surat (India)
vimeo

Focus Features - Samaki Mchangani

“Samaki Mchangani” (Fish of the Land) is short film in post-production about the “Africa rising” phenomenon. On the auspicious day when Godfrey launches the first Tanzanian cellular company, he is involved in a fatal accident. Haunted by his series of choices, our young ambitious entrepreneur reveals more than one face of ‘Africa rising’.

youtube

Coastal music; music from my people

This musician is called “AT” and he is probably my favourite Tanzanian singer. I do listen to Diamond sometimes though. 

I dedicate this song to my brothers/sisters from Tanzania and my Muslim brothers/sisters from Northern Mozambique!….Ke saudade imensa!!!!