sutter's

strictlyfromdullville  asked:

I was at a few panels at Gencon where you presented, and I want to say, you have excellent eyebrows. Also, I think James Sutter might be some sort of mummy, because I had a brief conversation and shook his hand and then caught whatever disease he had.

Thank you! I bought them from a lady in Greenwich and only have to feed them once a week. You may borrow (brow-ow?) them if you like.

And yes, Sutter is a mummy.

Protip: Touch no one at conventions. Most convention goers are mummies.

So, who else would like to see Sean Cahill, a) quit the SEC after this Sutter business is over and go join Pearson Specter Litt so we can have more scenes of him and Harvey together in their mutual respectathon, and, b) have him turn to Harvey over a glass of Macallan and say, “Okay, spill it, Specter. When exactly did you fall head over ridiculously expensive, handmade in Italy heels for Mike Ross? Because this ‘just good friends’ shit? I’m not buying it.”

Crop of my piece for the upcoming #SuggestivismResonance show curated by @nathanspoor for @spoke_art

Opening Reception: Thursday, September 1st (6 - 10pm)
Email sf@spoke-art.com if you’d like to receive an advance collectors preview

Spoke Art, 816 Sutter Street, San Francisco, CA 94109

Made with Instagram

MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING:
ASTRONOMERS USE EMPTY SPACE TO STUDY THE UNIVERSE;
A LOT OF INFORMATION CONTAINED IN COSMIC VOIDS, STUDY SUGGESTS

Researchers who are looking for new ways to probe the nature of gravity and dark energy in the universe have adopted a new strategy: looking at what’s not there.

In a paper to appear in upcoming issue of Physical Review Letters, the international team of astronomers reports that they were able to achieve four times better precision in measurements of how the universe’s visible matter is clustered together by studying the empty spaces in between.

Paul Sutter, study co-author and staff researcher at The Ohio State University, said that the new measurements can help bring astronomers closer to testing Einstein’s general theory of relativity, which describes how gravity works.

Sutter likened the new technique to “learning more about Swiss cheese by studying the holes,” and offered another analogy to explain why astronomers would be interested in the voids of space.

“Voids are empty. They’re boring, right? Galaxies are like the cities of the universe, full of bright lights and activity, and voids are like the miles and miles of quiet farmland in between,” Sutter explained.

“But we’re looking for bits of evidence that general relativity might be wrong, and it turns out that all the activity in galaxies makes those tiny effects harder to see. It’s easier to pick up on effects in the voids, where there’s less distraction – like it’s easier to spot the glimmer of a firefly in a dark cornfield than in a lit-up city bustling with nightlife.”

The voids, he pointed out, are only empty in the sense that they contain no normal matter. They are, in fact, full of invisible dark energy, which is causing the expansion of the universe to accelerate.

While Einstein’s 1915 general theory of relativity goes a long way toward explaining gravity in the universe, Einstein couldn’t have known about dark energy. That’s why, today, astronomers are working to find out whether the rules of general relativity hold up in a universe dominated by it.

Sutter, in Ohio State’s Department of Astronomy, worked with colleagues in Germany, France and Italy to compare computer simulations of voids in space with a portion of data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The statistical analysis revealed a four-times improvement in precision in their models of matter density and the growth of cosmological structure when they took the physics of voids into account.

They were looking for tiny deviations in void behavior that conflicted with general relativity, and they found none. So Einstein’s theory of gravity holds true for now. The analysis and models are publicly available online, so the researchers hope that others will use them to do further work in the future.

“Our results demonstrate that a lot of unexplored cosmological information can be found in cosmic voids,” Sutter concluded. “It’s truly like getting something from nothing.”

On This Day...

On this day in 1848, news of the discovery of gold in California broke along the east coast of the United States. The news, reported by the New York Herald, caused a sensation across the country and kicked off the California Gold Rush of 1849. It is almost impossible to overstate the importance of this event to the development of California as the state it is today: massive population concentrated among major cities along the coast, but also among several large, well-developed towns throughout the interior of the state. The Gold Rush transformed California from a recently conquered backwater territory to an economic cornerstone of the United States. It also fixed California in the American psyche as a land of wonderment where anyone could go to pursue their dreams of wealth and happiness.

Keep reading

Will the Great Attractor Destroy Us?

Paul Sutter is an astrophysicist at The Ohio State University and the chief scientist at COSI Science Center. Sutter is also host of the podcasts Ask a Spaceman and RealSpace, and the YouTube series COSI Science Now.

Somewhere, in the deepest reaches of the cosmos, far from the safe confines of our home galaxy, the Milky Way, lies a monster. Slowly, inevitably, it is pulling. Over the course of billions of years, it draws us and everything near us closer to it. The only force that acts over such immense distance scales and through cosmic periods of time is gravity, so whatever it is, it’s massive and unrelenting. 

We call it the Great Attractor, and until recently, its true nature has been a complete mystery. Note that it’s still a mystery, just not a complete one. 

The Great Attractor was first discovered in the 1970s when astronomers made detailed maps of the Cosmic Microwave Background (the light left over from the early universe), and noticed that it was slightly (and “slightly” here means less than one one-hundredth of a degree Fahrenheit) warmer on one side of the Milky Way than the other — implying that the galaxy was moving through space at the brisk clip of about 370 miles per second (600 km/s).

Even though astronomers could measure the rapid velocity, they couldn’t explain its origin.

[Watch: I explain the discovery of the Great Attractor in this video.]

The Zone of Avoidance

First, why is there a mystery in the first place? Astronomers are fantastically good at looking at stuff in space — it is, after all, their one job. So you’d think by now someone would’ve pointed a telescope in the direction of our motion and … well, figured it out. But there’s a problem: whatever the Great Attractor is, it lies in the direction of the constellation Centaurus, and the disk of our own Milky Way cuts right through our view that way. Our galaxy is full of junk — stars, gas, dust, more gas — and all that junk blocks the light from the more distant universe. 

So we’re fantastically good at mapping most of the large-scale structure of the universe, except where we’re forced to look through our own galaxy. Ever the dramatic bunch, astronomers have called this region the Zone of Avoidance. 

And dang it, the Great Attractor sits right back there, deep in the Zone, difficult to characterize. Thankfully, that’s been starting to change, as X-ray and radio astronomers have peered through the murky depths of the Milky Way and begun a hazy, uncertain sketch of that hitherto unknown patch of universe.

Go Big and go home

To understand what’s going on with the Great Attractor, we need to look at the big picture. And I mean Big: The biggest picture of all. Beyond our Milky Way galaxy is our nearest decent-size galactic neighbor, the Andromeda Galaxy. A little over 2.5 million light-years away, it’s practically down the street at the scales I’m talking about.

The Milky Way, Andromeda, the Triangulum Galaxy, and a few dozen hangers-on form the Local Group, a gravitationally bound clump about 10 million light-years across.

The Next Big Thing down the way is the Virgo Cluster, the Downtown of our local patch of universe: More than 1,300 galaxies packed into a dense clump only 65 million light-years away. The Virgo Cluster is gravitationally bound, too, which means about what you think it would mean: Its member galaxies tend to hang out near each other, tied up by their mutual gravity.

Going bigger than that and it gets a little fuzzy, in terms of defining extra-galactic structures. There are enormous collections of galaxies called “superclusters,” and for a long time they were loosely defined as “Eh, it’s larger than a cluster, but smaller than a universe.” They got sweet names, too, based on what constellation we looked through to map out the structure, or named after old astronomers: Virgo Supercluster, Hydra-Centaurus Supercluster, Shapley Supercluster, etc. That definition worked fine until we needed to start getting serious work done; e.g., figuring out what the heck is going on with the Great Attractor.

Go with the Flow

We live in a hierarchical universe. That is, over the past 13-and-change billion years, matter has been accumulating into small clumps, which merged into bigger clumps, which merged into even bigger clumps. The party came to a stop, however, about 5 billion years ago when dark energy started to dominate … but that’s the subject of another article.

Our universe has already formed galaxies, groups and clusters. Our own Local Group is condensing, with the Milky Way and Andromeda headed for a collision in about 5 billion years. The Local Group itself, along with some other groups and smaller clusters, are cruising along the gravitational highways to the downtown Virgo Cluster, which is at the center of the conveniently-named Virgo Supercluster.

And all the nearby stuff — including the Milky Way, Andromeda, the Virgo Cluster, and environs — are heading toward the Great Attractor. A combination of more sophisticated (read: any) surveys within the Zone of Avoidance, and a more sophisticated (read: any) understanding of what exactly is a “supercluster,” have begun to unravel the mystery of the Great Attractor.

Instead of just being a “large blob of galaxies,” studies of the velocities of galaxies in our local neighborhood of the universe have led to a better working definition of “supercluster:” a volume of space where all the galaxies in that space are “flowing” to a common center. And this definition has reworked our understanding of the local universe. The Virgo Supercluster isn’t an isolated object, but just an arm (to be fair, a tremendously huge arm) of an even larger structure: the Laniakea Supercluster. 

The Not-So-Great Attractor

Looking at super-galactic structures through the lens of flows of matter, it’s easy to see what’s going on with the Great Attractor. We live in a hierarchical universe, with small structures assembling like galactic Lego blocks into larger ones. The Milky Way and Andromeda are headed toward the center of the Local Group as it condenses. All the stuff in the Virgo Supercluster is falling toward its center: the Virgo Cluster.

And all the stuff in the Laniakea Supercluster is falling toward its center, currently occupied by the Norma Cluster, which is the accumulation of all the gas and galaxies that already beat us there.

[Watch: I describe the Laniakea Supercluster in this video.]

So the Great Attractor isn’t really a thing, but a place: the focal point of our patch of the universe, the end result of a process set in motion more than 13 billion years ago, and the natural result of the flows and buildup of matter in our universe. How did this process begin? Well, that, too, is another article….

And before I go: The Great Attractor won’t stay that Great for long. In fact, we’ll never reach it. Before we do, dark energy will rip the Norma Cluster away from us. Clusters will stay like they are, but superclusters will never live up to their names. So take comfort in that: we have nothing to fear from the Great Attractor.

Learn more by listening to the episode “What is the Great Attractor?” on the Ask A Spaceman podcast, available on iTunes and on the Web at http://www.askaspaceman.com. Thanks to Jone L. for the question that led to this piece! Ask your own question on Twitter using #AskASpaceman or by following Paul @PaulMattSutter and facebook.com/PaulMattSutter.

Editor’s Recommendations

Copyright 2016 SPACE.com, a Purch company. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.
First decent Suits EP in weeks

Alright, that thing with Kevin being a drunk driver was a little forced, I mean, what are the odds? But finally a good EP again. Mike going to a counsellor without actually being ready for it must have been my favourite scene, THAT is what I had been hoping for a *lot* more! 

The scene with Harvey, Mike, Kevin and Sutter in one room reminded me of the good old days, Mike did what he does best (maybe he should study psychology instead ;)) 

And that dream: Have you noticed that Harvey always points out that Rachel is “the woman Mike loves”? Not “the person”, “the one” whatever? 

Sons Of Anarchy : The Greatest Episodes

Kurt Sutter’s hard hitting crime drama chronicled the exploits of the Sons of Anarchy motorcycle club (aka SAMCRO) across seven blood-soaked seasons. At the show’s centre in Charlie Hunnam’s Jax Teller, the heir to the proverbial throne and son of deceased founder member John Teller. John’s ex wife and Jax’s mother Gemma (Katey Sagal), is the show’s domineering matriarch married to the club’s current President, Clay Morrow (Ron Perlman). The series follows Jax as he seeks to protect his loved ones from the increasingly brutal impact of the club’s dealings. Jax struggles to balance his unwavering commitment to SAMCRO alongside his desire to give his kids a better life. The episodes selected here represent the show at its very best - tense, brooding and unflinchingly violent.

*WARNING – SPOILERS APLENTY. DO NOT READ ON UNLESS YOU ARE HAPPY TO SEE MAJOR PLOT POINTS REVEALED.*



The Sleep of Babies (S1 E12)

A great deal of the show’s first season focused on Jax struggling to reconcile his feelings towards the club’s current direction after he finds a more peace-driven manifesto written by his late father. The season includes plenty of gang warfare and gun-running, but it’s in its penultimate episode that things take a truly shocking twist which then sets the stage for so many events which ultimately follow. When Clay authorises Tig to kill fellow club member Opie after he is wrongly assumed to be a rat, a terrible mix-up leads to Opie’s wife Donna getting shot instead. This is not only a big shock to us as viewers as we see for the first time that this is a show where nobody is safe, but also the characters themselves feel the repercussions of this seismic event for seasons to come.

NS (S3 E13)

There are very few happy endings in Sons of Anarchy. Rarely did something good happen without something utterly horrific following immediately after. At the climax of season three however, there was something that could genuinely be seen as a cathartic ending.  Loathsome ATF Agent Stahl and leader of the Real IRA, Jimmy O’Phelan have both been major antagonists throughout the season. The former is also responsible in part for Donna’s death in season 1 and the latter gave Chibs his facial scars and forced his banishment from Ireland. In a show that became synonymous with elaborate double crosses, this episode is perhaps the finest example of Jax’s unique cunning as we learn he has always been playing the long game and somehow gained a shot at revenge for both Opie and Chibs.

Laying Pipe (S5 E3)

Comfortably the hardest hitting moment in the show’s entire run is the brutal slaying of a beloved character in this episode.  When Jax, TIg and Opie wind up in prison and at the mercy of mob boss Damon Pope, one of them is required to be sacrificed in a fight to the death. Opie steps up to protect his brothers and after telling Jax, “I got this”, we see him get ferociously slugged with a lead pipe across the back of the skull and then get beaten to death before Jax’s eyes. Jax was responsible for bringing Opie back into the club fold several seasons earlier, and this marked the culmination of his friend’s turn from reluctant soldier to fully fledged hero. Opie was a fan favourite and this death hit us hard, just as it does Jax, who remains scarred from the experience for the rest of the show.

Aon Rud Pearsanta (S6 E11)

Clay’s luck finally ran out here as after six long seasons in which he murdered fellow club members and involved them all in dangerous drug deals, he finally met Mr Mayhem. He’s long since stopped being the club’s leader, but after getting out of jail and aligning himself with the Irish, you almost think for a second he might get away after all. However at the episode’s climax, after much manoeuvring and a tense standoff, Jax finally gets revenge for all the wrongs perpetuated by his step-father over the years by delivering a vicious gunshot through the neck.  

A Mother’s Work (S6 E13)

Gemma’s presence throughout the show shifted from protective matriarch at its outset to vicious psychopath by the close of its sixth season.  Since day one she has proven herself to be fully committed to protecting her son and keeping him and her grandkids close by under the control of the club. In direct opposition to this, lies Tara, who is equally determined to get her kids away from the outlaw life and their domineering grandmother. It all comes to a head at the climax of season 6 as Gemma convinces herself Tara is making a deal with the DA and so goes to Tara’s house and brutally murders her. Not only was this a truly shocking and horrific moment, it also marked the beginning of the end for Jax. Any concept of a happy ending went out of the window. You always kind of hoped he and Tara would make it out of Charming, but now a distraught Jax has lost both his best friend and his girl and with it any notion of getting out clean is duly abandoned.

Red Rose (S7 E12)

With the saga nearly complete, we witness Jax tying up a final few loose ends and demonstrating beyond doubt that he no longer cares about his own future. Driven past the point of sanity upon learning it was his own mother who murdered his wife, he sets off to confront Gemma. He’s already admitted to killing a fellow club member and therefore faced a mayhem vote, so his fate is all but sealed. His last order of business is taking care of Gemma. Their intense relationship was a vital piece of the show’s broader arc and it was a relationship born of unwavering love and unequivocal devotion. It’s as a result of this that once he tracks his mother down, Jax struggles with what he must do. Luckily, Gemma herself reassures him that he must go through with it, calmly telling him “it’s who we are”. With that, Jax shoots her in the back of the head. It’s an incredibly powerful moment that was seven twisting seasons in the making.


(Image Credits : FX)

Suits Review 6x06

Finally! I thought this week’s episode of Suits is the best they have had all season. The tone was right and the pace fit the show. And we actually got to see most of them being lawyers on a lawyer show. Imagine that? The upped the stakes on the main two plots with Sutter’s dismissal possibly going through and Bailey’s execution date getting set which gave the plot some forward momentum it’s been missing most season. This is the first episode this season that I haven’t been bored at some point and the time flew by for me.

That said, I still have some criticisms but then when do I not? Overall though, I thought this episode was a very welcome return to form for the show. But more on that and other thoughts on Suits Episode 6x06 - Spain after the cut.

Keep reading

Much ado about nothing: Astronomers use empty space to study the universe

Researchers who are looking for new ways to probe the nature of gravity and dark energy in the universe have adopted a new strategy: looking at what’s not there.

In a paper to appear in upcoming issue of Physical Review Letters, the international team of astronomers reports that they were able to achieve four times better precision in measurements of how the universe’s visible matter is clustered together by studying the empty spaces in between.

Paul Sutter, study co-author and staff researcher at The Ohio State University, said that the new measurements can help bring astronomers closer to testing Einstein’s general theory of relativity, which describes how gravity works.

Sutter likened the new technique to “learning more about Swiss cheese by studying the holes,” and offered another analogy to explain why astronomers would be interested in the voids of space.

Read more ~ SpaceDaily

Image: This simulation of the large-scale structure of the universe reveals the cosmic web of galaxies and the vast, empty regions known as voids.
   Image courtesy Nico Hamaus, Universitats-Sternwarte Munchen, courtesy of The Ohio State University.

Much ado about nothing: Astronomers use empty space to study the universe

A lot of information contained in cosmic voids, study suggests

Researchers who are looking for new ways to probe the nature of gravity and dark energy in the universe have adopted a new strategy: looking at what’s not there.

In a paper to appear in upcoming issue of Physical Review Letters, the international team of astronomers reports that they were able to achieve four times better precision in measurements of how the universe’s visible matter is clustered together by studying the empty spaces in between.

Paul Sutter, study co-author and staff researcher at The Ohio State University, said that the new measurements can help bring astronomers closer to testing Einstein’s general theory of relativity, which describes how gravity works.

Keep reading