sustainable it

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Santalaia in Bogotá, Largest Vertical Garden in the World

Santalaia by Paisajismo Urbano and Groncol designed the largest vertical garden in the world. Located in Bogotá, Colombia, the Santalaia building is completely covered with a lush layer of 85,000 plants that span 3,100 square meters (33,368 square feet). A vertical garden of this size can produce enough oxygen for more than 3,100 people every year, process 1,708 pounds of heavy metals, filter more than 2,000 tons of harmful gases and catch more than 881 pounds of dust.

Follow the Source Link for images sources and more information.

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Here’s how hospitals can heal through sustainability

  • According to a June 2016 study, if the U.S. health care industry were a nation, it would rank 13th in greenhouse gas emissions.
  • While a previous study found the health care industry caused 8% of the country’s carbon emissions, the new study found these emissions caused 12% of acid rain, 10% of smog formation and 9% of respiratory disease from particulate matter in 2013.
  • Moreover, hospitals are among the top 10 in their communities for water use and the single largest users of chemical agents. The volume of hospital waste is staggering — more than 2.3 million tons per year.
  • By taking steps to limit these environmental impacts, the health care industry can promote the long-term health of our communities, particularly the most vulnerable populations. Read more

In collaboration with Dignity Health

6 things i stopped buying: minimalism journey (+ reduce waste)

1. Makeup Remover Wipes: instead, use a washcloth (preferably black) and apply coconut oil or almond oil to the cloth (or face), then use the cloth to wipe your entire makeup off until satisfied. *(continue with face wash routine or face mask)

benefits: reusable // machine washable // save money // gentle on the skin // effectively removes makeup

2. Plastic Toothbrushes:  instead, buy a pack of bamboo toothbrushes on amazon or a general store. use these brushes as you would any other brush and thoroughly brush to improve oral health.

benefits: organic // reusable // decomposable // cleanses teeth effectively // eco-friendly // BPA free bristles

3. Multi-Step Facial Cleansers & Name Brand Body Washes: instead, use African Black soap for both your body and face with your preferred method of washing (electronic brush, hands, or wash cloth). for more simple face washes, consider using vegan and/or organic facial washes that work for your skin type.

benefits: multipurpose // improves overall skin health // all skin types (especially acne prone or oily) // single-step process // organic // save money

4. Plastic Water Bottles: instead, use a simple stainless steel bottle that you can refill throughout the day and keep up with.

benefits: reusable // washable // aesthetic // easy to monitor and handle // eco-friendly

5. Face Moisturizers: instead, use carrier oils (such as coconut oil, argan oil, almond oil, castor oil) that work with your skin type/skin needs *(you can try combining them with essential oils such as tea tree oil, lavender oil, etc.)

benefits: organic // improves skin health // no harsh chemicals // save money // longer lasting // multipurpose

6. Animal Cruelty Makeup: instead, buy makeup products that you truly need (wear daily) from companies that are Animal-Cruelty FREE and/or vegan. do your research and spend your money wisely. some may seem expensive, but consider how much some high-end brands benefit from not being animal-cruelty free *(invest in vegan and/or organic products too).

benefits: eco-friendly // animal-cruelty free // healthier for skin // long-term benefits // *vegan and/or organic

My Solarpunk Manifesto

My solarpunk is not just about flower-covered fashion and far-off futures.

My solarpunk is about sustainability, about community, about anti-capitalism. It encompasses ecofeminism, afrofuturism, radical queer politics.

My solarpunk is about urban gardening and renewable energy, about food sovereignty, and public transportation. It’s solarpunk to take the bus. It’s solarpunk to buy used clothes.

My solarpunk rejects current notions of “environmentalism” that place rich, privileged people at the top. My solarpunk realizes that it is the rich that create environmental disasters and the poor that suffers. My solarpunk realizes that radical change will not come from the corporations, but from the bottom up, from the inner cities and the reservations and the slums.

My solarpunk stands with indigenous sovereignties, with reproductive justice, with antiracism, with anticonsumption, with unions, with liberation theology.

My solarpunk realizes that the world is deeply, deeply flawed. But my solarpunk believes that there is hope, and that hope will come from the communal, not from the corporate.