sustainable development

theguardian.com
How your clothes are poisoning our oceans and food supply
New studies show that alarming numbers of tiny fibers from synthetic clothing are making their way from your washing machine into aquatic animals
By Leah Messinger

Buy less, and buy stuff made from stuff that’s not destroying the planet. Please.

Living the Life

Right now I’m:
-Drinking Margaritas
-Watching Gilmore girls
-Researching Green Roofs and sustainable development, and fucking loving this research because it’s so exciting and interesting and when that happens when I begin research for a school project I come out of it with like all the knowledge because of how obsessive I got while researching (maybe I’ll post some cool master posts about what I’ve researched here because I think a lot of people might find it really interesting too)
-Also, side note, I got a 97.5 on my first chemistry test for the semester and I’m fucking proud of that shit so hard

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So, let us start with the basics. What is the 2030 Agenda? What exactly is it that is going on right now?

The United Nations Sustainable Development Summit is happening in New York right now, and it will be happening for the next three days. It’s a meeting between world leaders where the aim is to all agree on the formulation of the 2030 Agenda and its 17 sustainable development goals and their 196 sub-targets. The meeting will take the whole weekend, but already the Agenda has been adopted, and we now have a world Agenda for the next 15 years. The Agenda will, to put it simply, dictate the approach of the UN in their work, both how they work internally and how they work with their member states and other partners. It will also have a huge impact on how countries tackle the different challenges that they are facing in everything from environmental sustainability, to education, poverty elevation and gender equality, just to mention a few.

Worth noting is that the negotiating part of the 2030 Agenda (where member states argues about if they should use this word instead of that, and other things that surprisingly will have much bigger implications than one might think) is more or less done. The draft of the goals has been negotiated and worked on since 2012 and he Rio+20 conference, and will most likely be adopted in their entirety at this stage.

The 2030 Agenda is “a plan for people, planet and prosperity that also seeks to strengthen universal peace in larger freedom”. It is at its core an integrated set of goals and targets that illustrates the interconnectedness of the “three pillars of sustainable development” (social, environmental and economic). All goals are in the formulation of their targets connected to multiple other goals, and together they create a web of targets and goals, where one cannot pull one strand without taking into consideration how it connects to other aspects of sustainable development. This creates a complicated set of goals, and the world is definitely facing a challenge in its work towards the realization of the 2030 Agenda. However, it is also our only chance to ensure that we protect not only our selves, but also the planet we live on, and that we ensure that the needs of the present is met while also ensuring that the possibility of future generations to meet their needs is safeguarded. Our actions these coming 15 years will be crucial for how life on our planet will look in the future, and there are many exciting, if challenging, things ahead of us.

New York City has a long and  proud history as host city of the UN – from its temporary home in Flushing  Meadows Corona Park, to its permanent home on the east side of Manhattan.  Mayor de Blasio and his administration take pride in the deep and lasting  connections between our global city and one of the world’s premier  institutions.

A global transition is needed to shift linear economic models typified by carbon intensive energy consumption and significant environmental impacts, where we ‘take, make and dispose’ natural resources- to circular models with reduced energy requirements from low carbon renewable sources, with minimal environmental impacts, and where natural resources are recycled and reused, and products are maintained and re-manufactured. 

Investing in projects and schemes, and across a range of sectors and scales, that align with this transition can have significant environmental benefits, as well as other positive sustainability related outcomes. Consider, as examples, the range of environmental, social and economic benefits that can be achieved at both a regional/national, and global, level of investing in cycling as a mode of urban transport- or by designing and engineering natural infrastructure that works in harmony with existing natural systems.

As NYC Junior Ambassadors, hundreds of students from across the five boroughs have the opportunity to act as representatives of their city, pledging to create a better city and a more sustainable planet. As part of the program students receive curated tours of the UN Headquarters, giving them a behind-the-scenes look at the UN and access to a growing alumni network of young, future leaders. They also receive classroom visits from an Ambassador to the UN or senior diplomat. Applications for Year 2 of the program are open through October 5! Educators from across the five boroughs and from any subject area can apply!

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