suspended disbelief

Please Forgive Me For This Rant . . .

… but somebody just stated the obvious on a post about Robert no longer looking like he did in the 70s. I don’t know if they’re assuming we don’t know this or if they thought they were being witty or whatever or if they were just being an asshole. Of course he doesn’t fucking look like that anymore. In the Tumblr Universe, there are many versions of Robert Plant. Some are 20 years old, some are 29 years old, some are 68 years old. Some are in a long term relationship with a particular lover and others fuck Jimmy Page. My point is this is a place where we suspend our disbelief. It’s magical realism. One part real and four parts fantasy. It’s a place for fun. So why not be nice? Ok, I’m done. Thank you guys for indulging me.

One of my favorite phrases my Creative Writing professor had for when you’re writing fantasy is ‘giving your story a Flux Capacitor’.

Because it’s not real, it doesn’t exist. But the way it’s thrown into Back to the Future, at no point does it throw the audience off or suspend any more disbelief than time travel would. You believe Doc when he says he created the Flux Capacitor - the thing that makes time travel possible, because the universe never questions him. 

So it essentially means like, there are going to be elements to your universe that are just not gonna make any sense, even if you set up a whole system based on it. And the only way to make it work is completely own it. You cannot second-guess your system or else the reader will too. You can give it the strangest explanation, but write it like you own it.  

masterofenthropy  asked:

Hi HeyWriters! I was wondering: do you have a tip to create a weak point on main characters? I´m making a story, but I´m having trouble since my main character is TOO overpowered. Could you help me with this?

(All of this is written under the assumption your character has superpowers or “special” abilities, so forgive me if you meant a different kind of power.)

I created a character concept when I was twelve. She had all the superpowers of my favorite heroes and then some. As time wore on she gained more and more until eventually my adolescent brain invented logic and realized she was actually ridiculous. Here’s how I depowered this character, who’s name is Ace, without completely ruining her coolness.

Step One:

Don’t be greedy. Any ability that does not contribute to the story needs to go. It’s taking up space that could be filled with credibility. I decided early on that Ace didn’t need most of her abilities, and by the end of the story she only relies on a few to get the job done. Also, if a character can do more than one thing that are all basically the same thing some of those should probably go (invisibility and camouflage, superspeed and teleportation, etc.). 

Step Two:

Apply real-world science. If you try to make your depiction realistic, you’ll want to have an idea of how these abilities might work and how they might not. Of course, you should suspend disbelief for some things if they’re truly essential to your character, but others can be adapted. For Ace there are some powers that only work under the right circumstances, and others that her body rejects or that give her physical pain when she uses them. Most importantly, special strengths come with special weaknesses. Sensitive hearing means loud noises are more jarring or harmful, regeneration means metabolism speeds up and the person needs to eat as much as a body builder. Any superpower you pick out will have a drawback, I guarantee it; if not a physical one then a social one (I’ll get to that).

This scene from The Incredibles is an excellent demonstration of superpower drawbacks.

Step Three: 

Consider how the character feels about all this power and why they obtained it in the first place. Ace was not born with abilities, but over time she chose certain powers for the purpose of defending herself or others. Some of her powers fade away when she stops using them, like any skill you fail to practice, and some abilities she just plain old refuses to use for personal reasons. Some are too difficult or time-consuming for her to master, and some even trigger memories of her traumatic past thus she discards them. This way she has a choice in the matter and her choice is not to bite off more than she can chew or what she doesn’t want in the first place. 

Step Four:

How do other characters feel about all this power? Perhaps some or all of your character’s powers intimidate, frighten, or anger others in the story. One of Ace’s friends dislikes how unstoppable she is, and others are taken aback by some of the things she can do or how she looks when she does them. On the whole, she hides what she can do or picks small things to do instead of big things, downplaying her own power when necessary. How your supporting characters react to the force of nature that is your MC is the most important aspect of her power.

Here’s an example from the X-Men of how other characters might react. 

For additional opinions and advice, read this https://mythcreants.com/blog/five-characters-that-are-too-powerful/ and take to heart its ending line: “There’s only one fix that avoids all the pitfalls of overpowered heroes: refrain from making them really powerful in the first place.”

Yes, Ace is a flawed concept and all the advice I just gave is only a patch kit for that flaw. However, overpowered characters continue to excite readers and viewers alike, so I would never suggest we dispense with them altogether. Just, when you’re getting a headache from how overwhelming your character is, it’s good to consider dialling it all back and focusing on the power of their personality instead.

—————————————————-

Super apologize for taking so long to respond, and thanks for asking in the first place.

Book review: Norse Mythology by Neil Gaiman

He has sipped the mead of poetry, conversed with Mimir, and cavorted with norns. There are no other rational explanations, because otherwise Neil Gaiman might actually - secretly - be a god himself, and I can only suspend my disbelief so far.

It isn’t difficult to argue that Norse myth is easy to present as a continuous story. Much of that reputation is the fault of Snorri Sturluson, the Icelandic poet and politician, who committed a selection of stories (known as sagas) to paper and codified what we now collectively refer to as the Nordic mythos. Retellings of these sagas are rare - you’re more likely to find translations of Sturluson’s work - and it is for that reason that this book is so special.

Gaiman brings his wit and strong character writing, as well as his unashamed love of the mysterious, to an enormously entertaining retelling of his favourite mythological universe. I should mention now: this mythos happens to by my favourite, too - so I’m perhaps, maybe, possibly 100% biased in favour of this book from the very beginning. Speaking of the beginning, that’s precisely where we start: a vibrant, expansive and imagery-rich opening sequence covering the life and death of the giant Ymir and the formation of the nine worlds.

From such lofty heights of literary prose one would, probably, if they were a pessimist, suspect that the writing would necessarily take a quality dip as more characters and events are introduced to the story. I am pleased to report that this is not the case - pleased because this has happened, previously, with other works on the same topic. Grand prose has a habit of giving way to the rote. Gaiman manages to strike the perfect balance between intellectual interest and joyous storytelling. His fiction background, naturally, has helped with this task enormously. 

Best of all are the characterisations of the gods themselves. Thor is a bounty of hard-headed brashness and implacable optimism…when he has Mjollnir, anyway. Odin is a wise and steadfast figure, if perhaps prone to his own brand of trickery. Freya is an unashamed feminist, constantly berating the Aesir for their unthinking folly. Loki is a proud and egotistical problem-solver with delusions of grandeur. Each character, be they god or elf or dwarf or giant (or eagle or wolf or snake) are presented with unique character traits and mannerisms. And to top it off, these gods do not speak in thees and thous: instead, Gaiman treats the gods as if they were real people with extraordinary abilities and responsibilities, and they speak accordingly.

Gaiman collects the best known stories and a few lesser, harder to research myths, and presents them as one cohesive story with an ease that Sturluson couldn’t possibly have dreamed of, and which few academics have replicated. From the beginning to the Ragnarok, the reader is completely transported.

@neil-gaiman has given the world an incredible gift, and we are not worthy.

Should I buy this book? Yes, a thousand times yes.
What do you rate it? 5/5 stars.
Favourite part? Every single time Freya snaps at Loki.

The Lost Special: The One Way to Tie Up Every Loose Thread

In the last month this corner of the Sherlock fandom has thrown out a multitude of ideas for a narrative that could potentially resolve every last inconsistency in Sherlock series 4. Not knowing it, this community has debated different readings – all perfectly valid with only minor holes in logic – but have missed how they might all fit together into an intricate puzzle, each reading validating the other.

I have found one way to connect every loose thread.

Topics resolved include:

– EMP Theory vs “TFP as John’s TAB”: why both readings are meant to be exposed to the viewer (but we just found them too early)
– Benedict’s insanely long monologue they mentioned him having in Series 4.
– How another episode would only be comprised of a few new scenes
– Mary’s character development drifting far from her original plotline
– Moffat’s Doctor Who narrative that includes Toby Jones as a Dream Lord and what that means for Amy in “Amy’s Choice” and Sherlock in The Lost Special.
– How POVs intertwine in TFP, and how TPLOSH inspired the way The Lost Special would end.
– The entire bizarre nature of Series 4
– Breaking the 4th Wall
– The focus in The Six Thatchers on “The Duplicate Man”, “Twins”, “Two places at once”, and “Dead AND alive”.
– Three Garridebs
– Benedict claiming “Love conquers all” while Steven Moffat facepalms.

So if you want to know the one way this could all work, check out the rest of this post. But hear me out until the end, suspend your disbelief until you’ve finished, because regardless of whether or not you believe we’re getting The Lost Special, this reading which combines everything we’ve talked about for the last year is definitely arguable and until something else gets proposed, it is the one I’m sticking with til the bitter end.

Keep reading

Prompt: I think you are beautiful and I would like to kiss you.  I can think up some clever lines, if you’d prefer.  But I wanted to say that, first. (None of those lines seemed to be about you or me.)
~1k, alternative meeting/meet cute, no warnings!
meme

Blaine sees him every morning. As his bus turns the corner at 8.36, the most beautiful man in the world is picking up flowers from a small stand, bill in hand ready to hand over. He always looks sad, Blaine thinks, his expression heavy and his shoulders a little too square, but he always thinks to himself that whoever it is that gets a small bunch of yellow flowers from the most beautiful man in the world every single day is a lucky person.

Blaine spends the rest of him commute imagining what a man that beautiful’s name must be. Something elegant, he thinks. Perhaps an Alexander. He’s so pale against the grey of the city that it almost makes sense to imagine that he’s Russian. Blaine imagines learning to make pierogi for him, and then bumps his head against the window and grins to himself. His mama always told him he was a hopeless romantic, and here he is, imagining a life with this man he sees for less than a minute a day.

(He’s given him many names and many lives over the weeks and months he’s seen him. Tomas is a Czech web developer who likes expensive wines and pretty Midwestern boys. Rhys is a Welshman who lives in London and working on an international contract for a telecommunication company. He likes French movies and American boys. Patrick is from Regina and is an international student. He’s brought his liberal Canadian politics with him and is buying flowers just to brighten his student accommodation with. Dicky is in family law, grew up in the Midwest and studied in New York and has never found a reason to go back. He loves fashion, scarves, and good Midwestern boys who love football. Blaine knows it’s ridiculous, but his own real life adventures in love have been more miss than hit, and a few seconds with the angel and his flowers has to be enough. His name is Anthony and he’s from Florida…)

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Sherlock Series 4 as “Epic Theatre.”

Largely inspired by @toxicsemicolon‘s theatre related posts- here; here and here

“Why would you do this, this pantomime, why?”

Mycroft’s anger is in response to Sherlock creating a theatrical performance, a lie to scare him. The mention of “pantomime” makes me think of false stories, and many metas have been written on the unreliability of series 4 in general, to not take it as face value: it’s a false story, all smoke and mirrors.

What if we take Mycroft’s words as both literal and symbolic, though? Sherlock Series 4 is both literal theatre and a constructed false story.

toxicsemicolon’s posts are mainly about Sherlock and the Theatre of the Absurd (to me, it’s like ‘what would happen if Sherlock suddenly made no sense, the point is there is no point! etc etc). And I was taking a screenwriting course, and something called Brecht and Epic Theatre was mentioned. I didn’t know what it was, but it sounded interesting, so I looked it up!

^This video really helped me start understanding it- I’m by no means an expert! This quote from it was particularly helpful:

“And we’re not meant to sit comfortably and predict what’s going to happen, because that’s not what this play is about. And I think the more they throw in things that are unexpected, the more that they shake you up when you feel like you know where this is going.

Basically, I think Series 4 is showing what happens when the normal ‘rules’ of the story we’ve been watching no longer apply. Now, we’re in the land of (UNCONVENTIONAL) theatre, and reacting in similar ways to how the first audiences of the theatre of the absurd and epic theatre reacted: disorientation, confusion, resistance. 

Introduction from wiki:  Epic theatre (German: episches Theater) is a theatrical movement arising in the early to mid-20th century from the theories and practice of a number of theatre practitioners who responded to the political climate of the time through the creation of a new political theatre. These practitioners included Erwin Piscator, Vladimir Mayakovsky, Vsevolod Meyerhold and, most famously, Bertolt Brecht.

Shared elements in Epic Theatre & Sherlock

While not invented by Brecht, the Verfremdungseffekt, known in English as the “estrangement effect” or the “alienation effect,” was made popular by Brecht and is one of the most significant characteristics of Epic theatre.[7] Brecht sought to “re-create the relationship between the actor and audience as dialectic” so that the audience would not longer “willingly suspend disbelief.”[8] The Verfremdungseffekt makes the audience feel detached from the action of the play, so they do not become immersed in the fictional reality of the stage or become overly empathetic of the characters with the hope that Epic theatre will turn “the spectator into an observer” and arouse “his capacity for action, force[ing] him to take decisions.”[9] 

This is what The Final Problem is all about to me. We’re encouraged to no longer view this as a ‘normal’ episode, to pay attention to the discrepancies- for example, the glaring ‘missing 10 minutes’ of John’s therapy appointment, and him apparently being shot by a tranquilizer gun. (x) And, there’s the general dissonance in tone of the entire episode- things that would normally give us a poignant, emotional reaction such as the burning of 221B are handled poorly (see If you want to make me laugh OR cry then do one, not both!This makes us resist our usual willingness to “suspend disbelief”, distances ourselves from emotionally investing like we usually would. 

And, that turns out to be a good thing, because now, we shouldn’t be emotionally investing in these particular portrayals of our usually beloved characters. They are deliberate caricatures of themselves. Turns out, that’s also part of Epic Theatre, specifically the way the “alienation effect” is achieved: 

Some of the ways the Verfremdungseffekt can be achieved is by having actors play multiple characters

This doesn’t happen quite literally in Sherlock- as in, say, Una playing both the role of Mrs Hudson and Norbury, or something like that. Rather, because our emotional investment has been removed, we are able to see the characters as stand ins for Something Else. For example, Mycroft is no longer ‘Mycroft’ but a stand-in for Mark, the writer watching his own creation crash and burn, and get high-jacked by The Final Problem story. 

More techniques:

rearrange the set in full view of the audience 

And yes, this one does quite literally happen. Our “set” of 221B is destroyed, and the audience gets to see it, “the stage”, re-made in front of their eyes:

And our own set designer of Sherlock, Arwel Wyn Jones, gets to have a cameo there- again drawing attention to the very fictionality of the show itself, its own set designer is doing work in front of our eyes that is usually reserved for off screen/on stage.

“break the fourth wall” by speaking to the audience.

Well, this phrase is definitely taken to the extreme… see this post:  Sherlock breaking the fourth wall by LITERALLY BREAKING DOWN FOUR WALLS AROUND HIM.

Lighting can also be used to emulate the effect. For example, flooding the theatre with bright lights (not just the stage) and placing lighting equipment on stage can encourage the audience to understand that the production is merely a production instead of reality.

Such a moment happens in The Six Thatchers, where we see a camera in the right-hand corner of the screen as John confronts Mary:

Seen more clearly in this post.

For more posts showing how S4 draws attention to the very fact that it is FICTION, see:

Deciphering Mycroft at the Movies

Remind you of anything? A facade? (Please let the projector light be our smoking gun)

Double Team

Title: Double Team

Summary: Sam and Dean get rough when they double team you in the shower. Inspired by this imagine (x).

Author:  Dean’s Dirty Little Secret

Characters:  Sam Winchester x female reader x Dean Winchester (no Wincest)

Word Count:  1883

Warnings:  nsfw, threesome, explicit language, explicit sexual content, unprotected sex, fingering,

Author’s Notes:  Thank you @mamapeterson for the advice and being my always awesome beta. I wrote this because my brain needed a break from the plot driven piece I’m working on, so I hope you guys enjoy some gratuitous smut. Let’s just put it out there that this is going to be one seriously cold shower by they time they’re done, I know that. Suspend your disbelief and pretend it’s a never ending hot shower. :-)

Keep reading

  • Korra: Avatars receive meaningless threats all the time. It’s really no big deal.
  • Lin: Of course. Totally. I mean, why would a death threat be a big deal? Oh, that’s right, because it threatens death!

The only modern AU I’ve seen so far that I liked was vegan yoga instructor Chirrut and his omnivore natural eating mechanic husband and so I’ve been thinking on that so consider if you will:

  • Chirrut and Baze used to be professional martial artists (though Baze was running hits for the mob at the same time) and met while training. Baze retired (from both jobs) to become Chirrut’s trainer.  The first time Baze asked Chirrut out was when after coded flirting in the locker room he absolutely wiped the floor with him on the mat.  
  • Chirrut takes Taoism very seriously, while Baze was raised Buddhist and doesn’t really care. 
  • Chirrut’s career ended when he was blinded during one of the many protests around Tienanmen Square in the late 80s/early 90s.  
  • Chirrut now teaches yoga to white middle class moms while Baze runs a small motor shop next door.  Chirrut sometimes calls out across the yoga studio in canto and Baze comments back in mandarin from the adjacent kitchen where he’s making tea and the white middle class moms think they’re cute because they’re such an old married couple in love but half of the time it’s a joke about one of them. They live upstairs and if you wear shoes in their home Chirrut will never let you live down your mistake.  
  • They got married as soon as it was legal to do so.  There was no real proposal, it was a mutual decision that made sense.
  • There’s a rumor that Baze knows how to get machine guns and military grade weapons illegally from China but if anyone comes knocking to find out they get shown the door and sometimes their own asses. But he does know, and has a mini arsenal of weapons hidden in various places in their zen hippie apartment. Chirrut has knives hidden in a few places.  They’ve made some enemies in their 50 years of being unapologetically political. 
  • One day Jyn Erso and Cassian Andor are running from government hired muscle or cops or whatever and run to hide in Chirrut’s yoga studio.  The government thugs tell this blind peaceful looking yoga gay to hand the kids over or else and not to push them they’re not against hitting a blind guy, and get their asses handed to them.  One of them almost gets the jump on him and is knocked out by a wrench to the back of the head by Baze who is like wtf is going on in here.  Jyn and Cassian are like THE FUCK DID I JUST WATCH THAT WAS AMAZING
  • They teach Jyn and Cassian hand to hand martial arts combat skills and Jyn is way better at it than Cassian. 

raythebrutallyhonestguy  asked:

I saw your blog and I must ask one thing for people I know: Why didn't they take the eagles? It's a question, not a way to piss you off.

Hello! Thank you for asking.  :D Gotta love the Eagles.

Lots of reasons!!! 

We all know that the fantasy genre is all about suspending your disbelief. When you’re reading a work of fantasy, you can accept anything….as long as it’s given an explanation that’s consistent with its world’s rules.  The explanation doesn’t have to perfect, it just has make enough sense for us to buy it. The “real” reason the Ring can’t be destroyed by an axe is because then we wouldn’t have a movie. “The Ring can only be destroyed in the Fires of Mount Doom because Evil Power Magic”–we accept that because it’s the premise of the film. “The Fellowship can’t take the Eagles to Mordor because these reasons”; that’s also something we’re supposed to accept. 

And the thing with the eagles is…we are given plenty of acceptable reasons/explanations? Reasons that might not be perfectly realistic (because nothing in fiction is perfectly realistic) , but are logical enough for you to suspend your disbelief.

In fact:

Hey, any fellow Tolkien Dorcs! 

Reblog this post with Reasons why the Fellowship couldn’t have taken the eagles to Mordor?

If you feel like it. You don’t have to but it could be fun.

My favorite is:

1) Mordor has tons of Anti-Eagle Defenses, making it impossible to enter by eagle

As screenwriter Philippa Boyens said during the film’s commentary: 

 "Why does everyone always say that(they could’ve taken the eagles)?! The flying Nazgûl on their Fell Beasts would have stopped them! How much more obvious does that need to be?! Mordor has flying creatures too!“

Originally posted by mirkokosmos

And in addition to the Fell Beasts/Nazgul, Mordor has plenty of orc archers at the ready. This is the universe where even a  powerful dragon like Smaug could be killed by a single arrow.  (Just one arrow! Killing a dragon ten times the size of a Great Eagle, and covered in armor-scales!) The book The Hobbit confirms that eagles fear archers, because arrows can grievously wound them. Gwaihir, the Lord of the Eagles, nearly died from an arrow wound.

 And even if you don’t buy that a single normal arrow could kill an Eagle (which it could) remember that Mordor weapons are often poisoned (like the arrows that nearly killed Faramir) or cursed (like the Morgul Blades the Ringwraiths carry, or in the Hobbit-film-canon the “Morgul Shaft” arrow that almost kills Kili.)  And Mordor has catapults! 

“But we see the Eagles in the Battle of the Black Gate and they seem to hold their own against the Fell Beasts!” Yeah, but 1) most of Sauron’s ground troops are occupied with fighting Gondor’s army– so there are no archers to shoot the eagles. 2) Sure, the Eagles can fight the Fell Beasts…..but would they be able to do it while people are balancing on their backs????????? Watch that final battle scene again and imagine Frodo on one of the Eagle’s backs, flopping around trying to hold on as the Eagle does all those cool spiraling-sideways and upside-down moves. Frodo would fall off and die. Splat. The end. Roll credits. 

There’s also the fact that “the broil of poisonous fumes”  Sauron creates can’t be all that safe to fly in.

TL;DR: A flock of eagles isn’t discreet– they couldn’t sneak in. They’d be spotted from miles away. 

And a military tens of thousands strong excited to begin war, thousands of archers, skies full of poisonous fumes, the War-Bats referenced in the Hobbit (book and film) and at least nine horrific-dragon beasts…all the might of Mordor…would fall upon on the group at once.

Only one Eagle would need to die for the Fellowship’s mission to fail– Frodo’s. And with all Mordor attacking them, either it or Frodo certainly would. 

I leave you with this:

anonymous asked:

hi! you know a lot about sex, and also writing. there's a fanfic trope that i have questions about two men realize their love, make out, want sex. but alas--no lube. never fear, one character grabs whatever is nearby for lube. i've seen lotion (as a person w/ a vagina this makes me terrified of irritation, but okay), vaseline, cooking oil? toothpaste?? whipped cream??? is it safe to put such things in one's butt? would that even be effective as lube? thank you.

Good question! There are many lubricating agents that reduce friction. MOST OF THESE AGENTS DO NOT BELONG IN THE BODY.

Fanfiction requires the reader to suspend disbelief, but there are moments when you simply can’t. Lube, like love confessions and mindblowingly good sex every single time it’s had, is the sort of thing that writers tend to hand wave, although some of the stuff used in fiction as lubricant boggles my fucking mind. Here is a list of acceptable and non-acceptable lubricants for fictional and RL sexy times.

Types of Personal Lubricant:

- Water-based: This is the best overall lubricant to use, as it does not interfere with latex condoms or silicone toys, is absorbed into the body without any issue, and doesn’t irritate the skin. The only drawbacks are that it can be absorbed by the body too quickly, being water-based and all, and it isn’t the best when it comes to anal sex (more on that in a moment). When using water-based lube, one may need to reapply a few times and steer clear of having sex in pools or the bath (as water-based lube will dissolve in water). 

- Silicone: Slipperier, thicker, and longer lasting than water-based lubricant, which makes it a favorite when it comes to anal sex. The thickness of silicone helps cut way down on friction (as the anal cavity does not provide its own lubricant the way the vagina does). However, silicone lube has its drawbacks as well. It’s been reported that some people’s skin reacts to using it. Also, it shouldn’t be used with silicone or jelly-based toys, as silicone molecules don’t react well with other silicone products, and this reaction can lead to the breakdown of the toy. Silicone lube is okay for harder materials, like glass, metal, and hard plastic. 

- Oil-based: While it has the benefit of lacking chemical additives, oil-based lube has a nasty tendency to break down latex condoms. I repeat: do not use oil-based lube with latex. 


Acceptable Lube found in fiction:

- The types of lube listed above (Astroglide, KY, etc.)
- Olive oil: Fine if condoms aren’t being used. 
- Saliva: Wouldn’t recommend using this for penetration; saliva dries quickly and is not enough to cut down on the friction of vaginal or anal sex. Hand jobs are fine, but characters will have to keep licking their hand to maintain optimal wetness.
- Vaseline: Fine if condoms aren’t being used (and if you don’t mind it sticking around for a while. Vaseline is notoriously hard to wash away.). 

Unacceptable Lube found in fiction:

- Butter: If the threat of bacterial infection isn’t enough to put you off, remember that butter is a milk-based product and will spoil. I’ve seen this used in fiction before and I always make the same, horrified face. If your characters are getting it on in the kitchen, have one of them reach for the olive oil instead.
- Hand lotion: Lotion is not for internal use, particularly not for vulvas, vaginas, or anal cavities. If your character is using this to jerk themselves or another penis-owner off, fine. But that’s it.
- Toothpaste: What? Is this a thing? Oh my god, DO NOT USE THIS AS LUBRICANT FULL-STOP JFC
- Whipped cream: See: butter. Also, gross?
- Blood: If you use this as lubricant, I will crawl out of your screen like the girl from The Ring and throttle you.

strontiumsun  asked:

I have a character who I write and draw named Hannah, a teenage black girl. Because her story takes place in the Dream World, she's always wearing pajamas. Not long before I discovered this blog, I learned that many black women wear head wraps to sleep. I want to be accurate to what black people wear to sleep, but Hannah's design has always involved her hair being visible. My question is, can she take the head wrap off but keep the rest of her pajamas on without it suspending disbelief?

Black Girl in a Dream World & Sleep Head Coverings

I do like the idea of keeping her hair visible and not hidden away or tied up 24/7. Seeing her pictured in her head wrap of choice at times would be cute and a nice piece of representation as well, though. 

Head wrap wise, you’ve got many choices, from silk bandanas, decorated to plain headwraps, and silk-lined hats, to the regular ole bonnet (commonly black but comes in colors, and often mistaken as a shower cap from those who don’t know what a hair bonnet is).

She could always be shown in the scarf, bonnet, or whatever she chooses to wear right around the time she goes to sleep/slides into her nightly routine.(Though as Brei mentioned here some do casually keep their wraps on longer.)

Also, some people, like myself (before I destroyed my pillowcase… but that’s another story), sleep on a satin pillow as a preferred night protection method and skip the bonnet most nights. 

All about the individual.

~Mod Colette

2

Or: why I appreciate the newbies on Arrow

*Note: This is a bit of a ramble, but I get very little time on SM lately and have been wanting to put this out for a while. So between tasks I had a few minutes, so here it is.


I was having a discussion with @ireland1733 the other day about (what else?) Arrow. One of the things that came up with her, and I continually see with other fans online, is the marginalization of OTA and the strong push for new characters.

Now I have made no secret of the fact that I love Arrow for Oliver, Diggle, & Felicity. And I have such a soft spot for my fellow STEM geek. LOVING Dark!Felicity so far!

Part 1: A LOT of what I see on the show I have to suspend disbelief because it’s a show inspired by / based on COMIC BOOKS. Not a whole ton of reality is expected. But Arrow is different. Despite some questionable choices made last year that included magic, Arrow has managed to stay well-grounded in their storytelling. But these three are always around. WILL NO ONE EVER PUT THE PIECES TOGETHER? (see Professor McGonagall above)


Part 2: I am not a “and they lived happily-ever-after” girl. I want to see some of the “happily ever after”. If season 3 had been the last season, I’d have been PISSED.

So…onward to season 4 and the sweet wonderfulness of newly discovered bliss.

But as I’ve said before, I still wasn’t satisfied. The domestic life was not fulfilling for Felicity (no more slow cookers), and Oliver was still running - this time from the Green Arrow side of himself. So… they blew it up. IN THE WORST WAY  - but that’s another story.

Fast forward to now. We’re rebuilding (the angst is REAL folks) and it both hurts and feels good at the same time (it’s GOOD angst). Olicity has been shaken to it’s core, but the rebuild has started and the RECONCILIATION IS COMING - I’M SURE OF IT.

Now - to my point. Oliver, Diggle & Felicity are the heart, soul and core of Arrow. But let’s be real. Or as real as we can be. One day (maybe we’ll see it, maybe we won’t) there will be Olicity babies (y’all can debate how many @jbuffyangel - I’m content with one). And maybe another Digglette (I don’t know, maybe a girl this time? I mean, again, I mean - UGH Arrowverse :() But babies take time. Effort. Single-minded focus. Did I say they take time? How are these two beautiful families going to be able to enjoy the lives that they’ve wished for if they never get a break?

Enter:

So I like the introduction of new characters. Do I miss Thea? ABSOLUTELY (and I’m hoping both that there’s a good explanation for her absence and that she gives EWR her comeuppance). I miss Roy.  But the new BC? Mr. Terrific? Wild Dog? I’m giving them a chance. Because of them, in time, OTA can be sitting on a beach somewhere toasting their friendship and good fortune, watching their children splash around in the surf, knowing Star City is in good hands.

anonymous asked:

oh god are you one of those people who reads romeo and juliet as a romance rather than a tragedy

I thought I was gonna go to bed early tonight but I guess not

hey friend you just unleashed my nerdy wrath buckle up

short answer: no, I know r&j is a tragedy and I read it as such. Shakespeare didn’t write “romances”, at least not in the sense you mean (some people call his later stuff that’s harder to put into a genre ‘romances’, such as the winter’s tale and the tempest)

so no I’m not a moron thanks

here’s the long answer:

I presume you’re “one of those people” who likes to count themselves as the Specialest Snowflake In All The Land because they don’t buy into the fake cheesy idea of //romance// that everyone else so blindly believes

maybe you like to talk about how romeo and juliet were “just horny teenagers”, how they knew each other for three days, how romeo so loved rosaline thirty seconds before spotting juliet, so clearly he’s fickle and silly. they weren’t actually in love, they were just teenage idiots.
because only stupid girls buy that stuff.
you’re more mature than that.
am I right?

well, here’s the thing, sunshine- you aren’t special. I hear this same damn argument right down to the last word every time I mention my love of this play and it ENRAGES me every time because 99% of the time this is coming from /other teenagers/. other young people talking about how this isn’t a story to be taken SERIOUSLY. it’s silly and frivolous and unrealistic. they don’t realize that this play is dedicated to them.

and it’s criticizing people just like you.

while I do believe that these two young people were soul mates (I’ll get to that later), I don’t really think this is a story about love. it’s a story about /passion/- how love and hate are only a hair’s breadth apart and their overwhelming capacity for healing or for destroying. the emotion that drives mercutio to defend romeo from tybalt. what drives mercutio to be killed at his hand. what pushes formerly docile, dreamy romeo to slay his cousin in law: it all begins to seem like the same continuous passion, enflaming the same group of people on the hottest day of the year.

as a result, love isn’t a pretty thing in this play. it’s linked inextricably to death, to murder, to chaos. love is presented as the most dangerous force in the universe. it leaves five bodies in its wake, and then at the end (people forget this) it’s what finally brings the ancient feud to an end.
it’s not silly. it’s not frivolous. o brawling love, o loving hate.

and who are the conductors of this unstoppable force? who sets verona burning and then rebuilds it better in under a week?


kids.


people with a shitty understanding of this play who love to dismiss it and downplay it like to call it a “cautionary tale”- why you shouldn’t think with your dick, why you should grow up and not be so rash, be sensible.

I agree with part of this. it is a cautionary tale. but it’s directed at YOU.

you, who devalue youth. you, who underestimate teenagers and what they’re capable of, who wave off their every thought or feeling with “just a kid”. who think that love is a pretty little silly thing and that no one under the age of 25 is capable of really experiencing it. that the kids don’t MATTER.

capulet thought it- he dismissed tybalt’s rage during the party as dumb kids throwing a hissy fit. he wrote juliet off as a child who should be seen and not heard, shuffled from her father to her husband, guided by the wisdom of those older and wiser than her.

in the world presented in the play, age has NOTHING to do with wisdom. the adults range from careless (montague) to helpless (lady capulet) to blithering (the nurse). the wisest character, the most eloquent and intelligent one with the most beautiful poetry, is fourteen year old juliet.
(go back and read it. whose speeches are the most beautiful, sophisticated, complex? Juliet’s.)

okay, fine, you say. but they didn’t love each other, they just saw each other and got hot and bothered and wanted to jump the other’s bones! anyway, what about rosaline?!

I’ll address rosaline first:

shakespeare likes making fun of the poets of old (take for instance his “my mistress’ eyes” sonnet, a deliberate parody of the Petrarchan model of frilly love poetry). heres another example in romeo. when we first meet romeo he’s mooning over a girl in the frilliest, stalest, most formulaic verse imaginable. we get the feeling he’s enjoying himself, basking in his misery.

notice, though, that we never see rosaline on stage. she represents romeo’s vague infatuation with the //idea// of love, the pretty image he made up in his head from reading old poems. this not only creates an incredible arc in his character, but makes his love for juliet obviously the real deal by comparison. he meets juliet and his world goes into free fall; he’s rash and violent and impulsive, and the verse that was so stale and ingenuine before shifts into some of the most famous passionate poetry in the english language.
in his first scene, he asks “is love a tender thing?” he falls in love with juliet- REAL love, not the kind in poems- and comes to answer his own question: no. no it fucking isn’t.


but, you say. but they CANT have loved each other! you don’t fall in love just by LOOKING at someone!

yeah, I know you don’t.

but here’s the thing. if you aren’t willing to suspend some modicum of disbelief, you won’t get anything from shakespeare. period.

we’re already assuming that these people just happen to walk around speaking in blank verse and rhyming couplet. the plot of hamlet relies on the existence of a ghost, a midsummer night’s dream on fairies, macbeth on witches, the tempest on magic, measure for measure on the friggin /bed trick/- is it SUCH A HORRIBLE STRETCH FOR YOUR CYNICAL POSTMODERN MIND TO MAKE that characters can identify their soulmates with a look? have we reached that level of lazy cynicism as a society that magical love flowers and vengeful ghosts are believable, where a woman can turn into a boy by shoving a hat over her hair and statues spring to life as deceased loved ones, but love at first sight (a very very common Elizabethan plot device; it’s /everywhere/ in shakespeare) is just too much of a stretch?

no one rolls their eyes at hamlet because “ghosts aren’t real. are you one of those people who believe in ghosts?” no- they take it for the plot device that it is in order to get to the message of the play as a whole, and the truths of the human conditions it reveals, with the help of some purely theatrical elements.

but kids in love. that’s far too silly.


it’s really fucking sad.


and questions like yours, anon? those make me really, really fucking sad.

anonymous asked:

If you're still taking prompts. What if Neil gets a concussion and starts mixing up his languages? I love your writing!

(thank you so much! I had so much fun writing this honestly also HEY apparently language based confusion post head trauma like.. doesn’t happen lmao but lets suspend our disbelief y'all)


It’s USC’s new “problem player” who does it.

There’s a scrimmage for the ball in the last quarter, and Neil ends up bodychecked into plexiglass head-first. His helmet goes loose and bounces away before he hits the floor.

Neil’s 5’3” against the backliner’s 6’5” is like pitting an axe against the base of a tree. Neil’s legs quiver like wind through leaves, and then he’s cut down.

Andrew watches the whole thing unravel, the wind-up and the swing and the bounce. Neil topples onto his back with the brutality of a drop from a moving car, and he doesn’t get back up. There’s an awkward minute of shouting and buzzers and repetitive shrugging from the backliner. Andrew leaves goal just as Jeremy crosses the court to jab a finger in his teammate’s chest.

“We do not fight dirty like that! Jesus Christ Trent, If we’d taken that point from them the win would mean what?”

“Nothing,” the backliner replies glumly, eyes down. Andrew takes it as a prime opportunity to punch him across the jaw with his whole weight behind it.

The guy goes reeling, holding his face and looking down at Andrew with slack jawed disbelief — doubtless surprised to find someone half his size had just loosened a few teeth.

Andrew feels Kevin at his back, and Jeremy steadies Trent by the shoulder as he levels eyes at him. “Can’t we be civil for one game?”

Kevin shrugs, sickeningly sheepish. “You’re in fox territory.”

“How could I forget,” Jeremy says, eyes rolling. He says something else but Andrew’s already turning to find Neil, his unchecked injury like an oven left on - the niggling, panicking doubt of it.

Jean’s crouched at Neil’s side, speaking quietly and firmly with his eyebrows yanked together like pursestrings.

“Get away from him,” Andrew says, dizzy with anger. All the times Neil has defended Jean and the things he’d let Riko do surface and clash in Andrew’s head.

Jean looks up, unconcerned with Andrew’s warning. “Something is wrong.”

Andrew puts himself between Jean and Neil, stepping right where Jean’s hands are splayed out on the floor so that he recoils. He leans over Neil and watches his open eyes, the frost of confusion on them.

“Get up.”

Neil finds him, like he’s squinting through smoke. “Je ne peux pas.”

Andrew grabs his shoulders, unamused. “Try again.”

“It was something else a minute ago. Something slavic?” Jean says. Andrew ignores him.

“Andrew,” Neil says urgently, eyes bloodshot and unfixed. “Je suis fatigué.”

“Don’t sleep,” Andrew warns. He pulls Neil to his chest and drags him upright by his armpits.

“Look, I’m sorry,” Trent calls from a few feet away, his team congregating behind him like disappointed parents.

“We’re benching him for the next couple of games,” Jeremy adds seriously. “You deserve better.”

“You touch what’s mine again and you lose a hand,” Andrew says airily.

Keep reading

i want a show that

  • doesn’t focus on romantic relationships
  • has a wealth of well-written female characters 
  • doesn’t require me to suspend my disbelief every five minutes
  • has a drama-free fanbase
  • doesn’t rely on flashy effects
  • produces consistently good storylines 
  • doesn’t kill off characters for shock value