susan queen

anonymous asked:

Can you recommend me good historical accurate books about the Tuodor era? (espicelly Henry the eighth and Elizabeth I)

oh, sure! i haven’t actually read as many as i’ve meant to read (i often quote excerpts from the previews available on google books for free because…i, a poor millenial) but i’d reccomend (i assume you’re asking for nonfiction):

the life and death of anne boleyn, by eric ives

henry: virtuous prince (prince who would turn tyrant), by david starkey, covers 1486-1511

elizabeth: the struggle for the throne, by david starkey, covers 1533-1570s, but mainly focuses on her girlhood, the reign of edward vi and mary i and the early queenship of elizabeth (he does a good job of distinguishing the truth from the probably apocryphal…something hard to find with historic nonfiction, i find) 

creation of anne boleyn: a new look at england’s most notorious queen by susan bordo

the tudors: the complete story of england’s most notorious dynasty by g.j meyer is a decent overview and at times entertaining, but you have to fact-check certain passages. this one’s not so good at separating the truth from the apocryphal, but the book does a good job of setting the scene, and there are background passages in between chapters (The Spanish Connection, the Origin of the Tudors, etc.) which is nice, too. but this is more of a ‘popular history’ genre, i’d say. not nearly as detailed and w/out nearly as many primary sources as the ones mentioned above (or below:)

i’m about to start a bio of catherine howard (young and damned and fair) so i will let you all know what i think as i read  ♡

Ok but I’ve been binge watching the Narnia movies again, after not having seen them for a long ass time, and now, being a little older and (hopefully) a little more mature than I was when I first saw them, I always feel physically sick when I see the Pevensies being children after The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe because they just aren’t anymore and I can’t even begin to imagine what it must be like, to grow up as kings and queens, respected and important, and full of duty, only to go back to being 8 years old (in Lucy’s case).

They didn’t remember England, or the wardrobe, or their old lives, they were Narnians and they were pushed back, not only into a world that was bound to make them miserable, but also into bodies that couldn’t reflect what they’d been through.

Just imagine Peter, waking up in the morning, not remembering that he isn’t the Magnificent anymore, imagine him subconsciously reaching for something to trim his beard, only to remember that it isn’t there anymore, to expect old battle wounds to hurt until he realises that they can’t because he doesn’t have them.

Or Edmund, who left England a stubborn selfish little boy who only wanted his mummy back, and came back the Just, the redeemed traitor, the diplomat, the man, having to resort to being ten years old and probably not even allowed to peek at a newspaper because he’s just a child after all. He plays chess, incredibly well, he doesn’t mock his siblings anymore and all the friends he knew when he was still a boy are either irritated at his behaviour or too childish, too selfish for somebody who knows very well just what selfishness can do, who has a part of the White Witch in him, always.

Susan forgets, we all know that. She must’ve lain awake at night, remembering just what it felt like to cover pain and viciousness and gore with a smile and a blush, remembering being the Gentle, but never in war. She must’ve cried for all the lost years, for all that she learnt and that she can never forget, for all that she has accomplished, that will bring her nothing in this world that doesn’t feel like hers. So she sits down in front of a mirror, talks herself out of believing, telling herself that it wasn’t real, that it was just a dream, that this Narnia her siblings talk about is nothing but a game.
The truth is too terrifying, to devastating to face.

Lucy, little Lucy, who grew up under Mr Tumnus’ smiles and Aslan’s approving gaze, who was loved by all, who did learn how to rule, how to negotiate but who never forgot just what it means to be a queen of Narnia, this girl who matured into a woman, who had a woman’s mind and body and a queen’s grace, she who they called the Valiant, the lion’s daughter, she shrank into herself, into a child, younger than even her siblings. She remembers, clearest of them all, she is the only one who still knows Mr Tumnus’ face, still knows Aslan, but she is just a girl, a pretty little thing who will never be the queen she was, who will never be the woman she was because queenship forms a person in ways no schools can.

They must’ve been devastated when they tumbled to the floor, short and small, and there’s a war they have no control over and Lucy is small, Edmund is skinny, so skinny and Peter and Susan have lost their glow and they’ve changed, they’ve changed so much. (The first time, somebody calls them by just their names, they feel invalidated and small. And offended. They’re kings and queens, they’ve earned their titles and now they have to sit in a dim room filled with children and listen to teachers, have to allow themselves to be insignificant and nothing more than what they were when Lucy first stepped into Narnia - frightened children in the middle of a war they wish was never there in the first place)

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Reason Why Marceline is WLW #1/?: Goes from being grumpy, tired, and antisocial to immediately perking up when she sees Susan coming in from off screen, greets Susan in a flirtatious voice (specifically says “Good morning!” after just complaining about being up too long and having to see it), smiles at Susan and doesn’t take her eyes off her, even as Susan fails to regard her + walks away.

I always kind of laugh when people get into the “Susan’s treatment is proof that C.S. Lewis was a misogynist” thing, because:

Polly and Digory. Peter and Susan. Edmund and Lucy. Eustace and Jill. 

Out of the eight “Friends of Narnia” who enter from our world, the male-to-female character ratio is exactly 1/1. Not one of these female characters serves as a love interest at any time. 

The Horse and His Boy, the only book set entirely in Narnia, maintains this ratio with Shasta and Aravis, who, we are told in a postscript, eventually marry. Yet even here, the story itself is concerned only with the friendship between them. Lewis focuses on Aravis’ value as a brave friend and a worthy ally rather than as a potential girlfriend–and ultimately, we realize that it’s these qualities that make her a good companion for Shasta. They are worthy of each other, equals. 

In the 1950s, there was no particularly loud cry for female representation in children’s literature. As far as pure plot goes, there’s no pressing need for all these girls. A little boy could have opened the wardrobe (and in the fragmentary initial draft, did). Given that we already know Eustace well by The Silver Chair, it would not seem strictly necessary for a patently ordinary schoolgirl to follow him on his return trip to Narnia, yet follow she does–and her role in the story is pivotal. Why does the humble cab-driver whom Aslan crowns the first King of Narnia immediately ask for his equally humble wife, who is promptly spirited over, her hands full of washing, and crowned queen by his side? Well, because nothing could be more natural than to have her there. 

None of these women are here to fill a quota. They’re here because Lewis wanted them there. 

Show me the contemporary fantasy series with this level of equality. It doesn’t exist. 

  • Something politically or socially crappy: *happens*
  • Me: This would never happen in Narnia under the rule of King Peter the Magnificent, Queen Susan the Gentle, King Edmund the Just and Queen Lucy the Valiant or under Caspian X
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I did bees for a few reasons (one of them being the @nailpornography theme for this week). They remind me of my childhood dog and my niece, and I just really love bees. The Black-eyed Susans are for my grandmother, they grow wild on the side of the dirt road where she lives in the countryside. I included a bunch of shots because I am REALLY proud of how these turned out. They are probably my second most favorite design I’ve done (next to my easter bunny nails). There is some tip wear because I waited a bit to paint these but it’s not much so I didn’t bother to fix it.
 
I used Color Club Halo Hues Harp On It, and Color Show Impeccable Greys with ILNP My Private Rainbow. The rest of the design is acrylic paint.

Tether: Arrow 5x16 Review (Checkmate)

I had two wishes for tonight’s episode.  First, that Oliver and Snoozan break up because, as you all know, I’m super done with her.  Second, that Prometheus not suck because, as you all know, I’ve been super unimpressed so far. @fanmommer​ can confirm these wishes.

Alright, so I didn’t get wish #1 (just a matter of time kids), but Oliver delivered fantastic Snoozan shade,  so I am satisfied. Wish #2 came true however.  The Big Bad does not suck. He’s awesome. 

That and a subtle, but meaningful Olicity scene means I am one happy camper.

Let’s dig in…

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Talia: Oliver was an exceptional student and an exceptional lover as well.

Nyssa: Husband please tell me she’s joking about that last part.

Malcolm: You really do have a thing for sisters don’t you?

Oliver: Not the time Malcolm.

Malcolm: We’re all stuck on this boat. It’s a long ride home. I’m just looking for some entertainment.

Rene: So you hooked up with Laurel and cheated on her with sister Sara, and William’s mom and you slept with Talia and Blondie?

Felicity: Don’t forget Isabel.

Thea: And that dragon lady Susan.

Slade: And Shado.

Oliver: I wish Adrian had killed me. I really wish he had.

  • Eustace: Imagine if someone handed you a box full of all the items you’ve lost throughout your lifetime.
  • Lucy: Oh wow, my childhood innocence! Thank you for finding this.
  • Susan: My will to live! I haven’t seen this in 15 years!
  • Peter: I knew I lost that potential somewhere!
  • Edmund: Mental stability my old friend!
  • Eustace: Guys, could you lighten up a little?