susan b

Okay but I just imagine the Pevensies going to their respective schools after Prince Caspian, and it doesn’t take the other kids long to notice something is…off about them.
There’s something rough in the edges of Peter that the worst of the other boys keep getting cut on. Something powerful and confident. He was always likable, the shining golden child that the school trots out as a perfect example to incoming students, but now he is strong, he has emerged from the countryside a leader. He stands up to bullies, he always has, but he’s more eager to get into a fight these days than to talk them down. He’s a strong hand and quick word, but there’s power to back it up this time.
There’s something in the way Susan tilts her head that makes her seem like a woman. The way she carries herself high and tall, the proud line of her shoulders as she walks down the hall that makes some lable her to high and mighty for her own good. The world doesn’t know what to do with queens, and that’s what Susan seems to be these days.
There’s something dark lurking in Edmund that makes the other boys uneasy. Something wild and untamed in the now quiet boy. He no longer gets into fights, no longer bullies or mocks the others. In fact, he’s taken to stopping fights, to pushing back against his former friends when they try to take things to far. His roomate claims he wakes screaming from nightmares sometimes, and the stillness of his presence belies the intensity of his eyes.
There’s something burning in Lucy that wasn’t before. All the teachers comment on it. There’s something loud and cheerful in the girl who used to be quiet, and she makes friends even faster than before, pulled in by her captivating orbit. She spins fantastic tales, and is scolded for having her head in the clouds. She tells her tales of magical kingdoms as if she were really there, and gets sad sometimes, as if she misses the people who were never there.

Everyone agrees that something happened to the Pevensie children in the country, but they never talk about it. The adults eventually just chalk it up to the war, and almost forget about the strange children that populatetd their classrooms, until they read about the tragedy in the paper. Then they remember. And they never forget.
9

As Susan B. Anthony’s name trends on Twitter — and as people blanket her Rochester, New York, grave in “I Voted” stickers — it’s worth remembering that Anthony’s legacy is a paragon of white feminism. Anthony’s pursuit of women’s rights came with a hefty dose of racism. On its website, the National Women’s History Museum is careful to emphasize that Anthony’s problem wasn’t with black men voting, per se.

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religion-of-one  asked:

Any chance you can help provide references to Susan B Anthony's racism? I've got some ignorant white "feminists" to educate.

“I will cut off this right arm of mine before I will ever work or demand the ballot for the Negro and not the woman.” – Susan B. Anthony 

“What words can express her [the white woman’s] humiliation when, at the close of this long conflict, the government which she had served so faithfully held her unworthy of a voice in its councils, while it recognized as the political superiors of all the noble women of the nation the negro men just emerged from slavery, and not only totally illiterate, but also densely ignorant of every public question.” – Susan B. Anthony 

“The old anti slavery school says women must stand back and wait until the negroes shall be recognized. But we say, if you will not give the whole loaf of suffrage to the entire people, give it to the most intelligent first. If intelligence, justice, and morality are to have precedence in the government, let the question of the woman be brought up first and that of the negro last.” – Susan B. Anthony & Elizabeth Stanton 

Quotes from Kirsten West Savali article “‘When and Where I Enter’: The Racist Expectations of Whites-Only Feminism”

Tumblrs reverseracism and knowledgeequalsblackpower have several posts on this, so be sure to head over there and take a look. 

“You’re one Person...”

“…you can’t make a difference.”

Oh No!

You’re right!

I mean

It’s not like

Individuals

Have ever

Made lasting

Positive

Impacts

On the world.

That would be impossible!

Completely Insane!

And unheard of!

Too bad for me…

4

“I’m going to order 36 more episodes of the show: two years of 18 episodes.”
- Jennifer Salke (President of NBC Entertainment) (x)

anonymous asked:

you aren't a real feminist if you don't support zarkon. real feminists support other feminists. who cares if he commits fascist acts every day? his overqualified assistant is FEMALE. honestly we should be thanking him for all that he's done

Remember… the next time u vote, it’s because zarkon died on the cross for our rights 😭🙏🏼😭

It is a lie that women have been able to vote since 1920. 

White women have been able to vote since 1920. All Native American women couldn’t vote until 1924. All Asian women couldn’t vote until 1952. All Black women couldn’t vote until 1964.  

In five years there is probably going to be some big centennial celebration of women’s suffrage. But that will be a whitewashing of history. It will be an event that erases the struggles of non-white women. It will be an event that will try to hide the fact that white feminists heros like Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton actively argued against the rights of people of color in order to advance their own goals. 

6

Black feminists deserve to be honored this Election Day, too

Women are leaving their “I Voted” stickers on suffragist Susan B. Anthony’s tombstone in Rochester, New York. But Evette Dionne, a senior editor at Revelist, is asking them to save some of these stickers for Ida B. Wells and other black women who paved the way for women’s rights.

Ida B. Wells was an African-American journalist and pioneering intersectional feminist, who fought for women’s right to vote and against the lynching of black men. Susan B. Anthony was an undeniable leader for white suffragettes, but also had a real history of racism.

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Happy Women’s History Month!
There’s not enough space to credit all the groundbreaking women throughout history, but here’s a few.