surihaku

2

Orizuru Tomesode. Mid to late Meiji period (1880-1911), Japan.  The Kimono Gallery.  A silk kuro-tomesode featuring intricate stringed paper-crane motifs worked with yuzen resist dyeing, brush-painting and surihaku gold-foil outlining. One unusual feature is a double, heavy silk lining, so obviously this garment was intended for winter use. Five mon (family crests). The orizuru (ori- “folded,” tsuru “crane”), or paper crane, is a design considered the most classic of all Japanese origami, and was first illustrated in one of the oldest known origami books, the Hiden Renzuru no Orikata (1797). According to Japanese lore, folding 1,000 Origami Cranes is truly a labour of love. Tradition holds that the bride who finishes this task, called ‘sembazuru’, before her wedding day will be richly rewarded with a good and happy marriage. Paying homage to the majestic crane, which mates for life and is said to live one thousand years, the bride ensures her own good fortune. The many origami cranes created on this kimono are meant to represent the thousand. Kuro-tomesode (black tomesode) are often worn for wedding ceremonies by married female relatives of the bride or groom.

External image
External image

The Surihaku is an inner garment for female roles. Patterns are created by pressing gold or silver leaf on paste which is applied in the desired configuration on the fabric. The so-called “urokohaku” (repeated pattern of triangular scales), in particular, symbolizes deep attachment and uncontrolled passion in women, and is used for female roles that appear in Noh drama as demons or serpents.

Noh ( ), or Nogaku (能楽 Nōgaku) — derived from the Sino-Japanese word for “skill” or “talent"— is a major form of classical Japanese musical drama that has been performed since the 14th century. Many characters are masked, with men playing male and female roles. Traditionally, a Noh "performance day” lasts all day and consists of five Noh plays interspersed with shorter, humorous kyōgen pieces. However, present-day Noh performances often consist of two Noh plays with one Kyōgen play in between.

2

Taisho Kasane Furisode. Taisho period (1912-1926), Japan. The Kimono Gallery. This large main (outer) furisode of a three-furisode kasane set. An impressive garment, with its use of a wide range of colors and motifs combined in a sophisticated and masterful manner. The motifs are rendered in yuzen dyeing; sagara, satin-stitch and couching embroidery, and surihaku outlining. Of note is that some of the satin-stitch embroidery utilizes metallic thread - quite unusual. The bottom of this furisode has padding much like the uchikake. There are five mon (family crests).

2

Silk kimono created for wear during the colder winter season.  Profuse surihaku (metallic leaf outlining). In order to achieve the subtle shading of whites and off-white on the background, the artist has laboriously yuzen-dyed (resist painting) the entire background to realize the desired effect.  Mid-Showa era (1945-1960), Japan.  The Kimono Gallery

Silk Surihaku (Noh theatre costume). Azuchi-Momoyama Period,

16th century, Japan.  Designated by Japan as “Important Cultural Property” Tokyo National Museum. This example would be one of the oldest extant Noh theatre costumes.

Kimono fragment, early 17th century (1600-1650).  Monochrome figured satin silk (rinzu) with applied gold leaf decoration (surihaku), tie-dyeing (kanoko shibori) and embroidery in silk and metallic threads. Like many kimono fabrics it is patterned with a combination of dyeing and embroidery. It also features the use of gold leaf, surihaku, which has been fixed to the cloth with paste applied through a stencil. The use of surihaku, often as here in combination with embroidery and tie-dyeing, against a dark ground is a feature of kimono from the early 17th century.  V&A Museum