supermane

Watch The Conjuring 2

Watch Now You See Me 2

Watch The Legend of Tarzan

Watch Me Before You 2016

Watch Independence Day: Resurgence

Watch Back in the Day

Watch Finding Dory

Watch Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice

Watch Captain America: Civil War

Watch X-Men: Apocalypse

Watch Allegiant

Watch Deadpool

Watch Kung Fu Panda 3

Watch Warcraft

Watch Zootopia

In the world of superheroes, death is little more than an unscheduled break between punching a bunch of assholes in discount Halloween costumes. Both Captain America and Superman, the blue-clad flagships of Marvel and DC, have “died” and came back to life more times than the Winchester brothers.

But while their returns from the Great Beyond were joyous occasions in the comics, in the real world, they’d cause total anarchy. Proving someone’s death would become the biggest hassle ever. Every time you’d try to cancel your dead grandma’s phone service or credit cards, Comcast or VISA would be all, “Yeah, but what if she was a Kryptonian or a super soldier, and will resurrect soon? Let’s give it a few more months before we do something crazy, like stop billing her.”

In superhero universes, death is probably treated like workplace injury – everyone assumes you’re faking it, and almost certainly hires investigators to catch alleged corpses coming back to life. In Netflix’s Daredevil, there even exists a cult of ninjas with the ability to bring people back from the dead. Are they alive? Are they dead? Do they still owe Columbia House money?! That’s something we’d need to figure out, and fast.

5 Problems Superheroes Would Have (Movies Don’t Address)

Here’s a roundup of the 3 DC Comics movie posters & trailers that created a huge buzz for Warner Bros. at SDCC and around the internet!

Wonder Woman Official Movie Poster

Wonder Woman Official Trailer


Justice League Official Movie Poster

Justice League Official Movie Trailer


LEGO Batman Official Movie Poster


LEGO Batman Official Movie Trailer

anonymous asked:

Can u talk to me about man of steel bc i just saw it for the first time and i loved it but a friend i value the opinion of v much said it was bad bc clark killed zod and destroyed metropolis and so on and now im :(

Man of Steel is an origin story in the best sense of the word because it doesn’t let Superman emerge fully formed as a public, assured figure by the end of the movie. It’s a purely character-driven story that throws an inexperienced, fearful young man with superpowers into the toughest fight of his life, against powerful, trained warriors who have the same powers he does. It strikes the bittersweet chord that defines Superman stories–the knowledge that even someone who is an absolute good, who only wants to help others, will not always be equipped to do so, especially in a cynical world that may not buy that his mission is a good one. But what defines this Superman is that he is the man who tries, in spite of all odds, and this movie is about him claiming that identity, which is an empowering move for him even when he can barely keep up with Zod.

What I love most about Man of Steel is that Clark spends so long resenting his powers, feeling confused and frightened and trying to live a normal, quiet life, helping people in the shadows, moving on the second he does something outside the normal bounds, but then he finds the courage to come out of hiding. He’s still trying to understand his powers, push their limits, figure out how to fight. Fight for peace, fight for his home, fight for Lois and Martha. He’s just a boy from Kansas, but he realizes that he’s more than that, and thus has the responsibility to stand up for Earth when it’s threatened. 

And that makes the Zod fight so interesting–because on the one hand, Clark gives his all to protect Earth, deliberately choosing to save the lives of one human family over Zod, his last connection to his history and his people, but on the other hand, his powers aren’t refined, and there’s a lot of collateral damage while he’s trying to stop Zod from destroying the entire Earth. It’s understandable from where he’s at in his character arc, and it’s heartbreaking to see Clark try his hardest and still not quite know what to do. The destruction of Metropolis is not Clark’s fault, but it’s not not his fault, and the movie showcases the fallout on a human level. The damage leads us directly in Batman v. Superman, which questions Clark’s role in the damage and whether his interference in human affairs can ever be justified. 

The first time I saw Man of Steel, I was surprised that they went directly into Kryptonian lore, that Zod was the first enemy Clark faced. It felt like something we usually see superhero franchises build up to; you start off small, you give your heroes victories and confidence, and then you ramp up the stakes each time. But by starting with Zod, the characters in the DC universe all get to see and understand–on a visceral level–the full extent of Clark’s abilities and all the awe and fear they inspire. Clark’s next villain isn’t someone bent on world destruction, but someone who wants Clark to continue questioning his values, which is a bigger yet more intimate arc, an internal dilemma that continues Clark’s fear and uncertainty that we see in MoS. I love love love how quiet and careful Clark is in these films, someone we can see deliberating his every move, weighing the risks. Basically nothing about the Superman mythos is taken for granted–Clark is sweet, but he’s not naturally open or confident; Clark is powerful, but he’s not naturally skilled in combat or comfortable fighting anyone head-on; Clark wants to help, but he slowly (especially over BVS) starts to wonder if he should, not just because of Lex’s manipulation, but because good people raise those questions, and Clark values them enough to do some soul-searching about what it means to be Superman. 

Everything introduced in Man of Steel has an impact on the characters on a psychological level. That moment after Clark kills Zod, he’s horrified, and he immediately looks to Lois for emotional support, because even if he knows he had no other choice, even if he knows he probably saved a life, it still hurts him immensely. He needs Lois to help him through it. The weight of his decisions are so evident and so much a part of the narrative, and that’s so rewarding to see. It feels fresher than the way a lot of superhero films handle it, where we basically build up the conflict of the hero not wanting to kill and then finding a way out of it at the last minute, or constantly worrying over their significant other and not wanting to be with them, or not wanting to be a superhero anymore but feeling called out of complacency. There’s just a formula these things usually use, but MOS and BVS just … do it. They let the heroes make decisions and the decisions have an effect on them and on the world. Nothing returns to the status quo at the end of the movie. The heroes don’t get to rest easy knowing they’ll win, or knowing they can start fresh. They just get to fight through it. I love that, I treasure it. It makes every victory feel so earned and so real and genuine and it makes me cry.

4

“I could not tell you if I loved you the first moment I saw you, or if it was the second or third or fourth. But I remember the first moment I looked at you walking toward me and realized that somehow the rest of the world seemed to vanish when I was with you.”
Cassandra Clare

Discovery of Self

Prompt: superman one where your his daughter and you love playing the piano and music and stuff but because of his hearing he can’t listen to you play and so you get really sad about it and you get a surprise scholarship to a music school abroad and you kind of leave him and he doesn’t really know what to do???

AN: Let’s just talk about this little prompt right here … This turned into something that I love. Hopefully you guys enjoy it too.

Words: 1144


           You wait for him to come home. You just sit at the kitchen table and wait. You’re reading in your chair when the door finally creaks open, and he walks in. Those stupid glasses are on his face, and you don’t understand how they hide anything.

           He doesn’t even pause, he just walks straight to the fridge, pulls out the carton of ice cream, and two spoons and sits down. You both take a few bites before he finally asks “Okay, what’s up kiddo?”

           You prepare yourself to tell him, but instead you ask “Were you able to save everyone.”

           He smiles, as he takes off his glasses “Yeah, your brothers and I were able to get everyone to safety. The rest of league was tackling a tsunami.”

           There’s another moment of silence before you say “Mom called from Milan, the story is taking longer than she thought, she’s going to be another three days.”

           He just smiles “Excellent, she’ll make it back in time for the cookout this weekend, everyone’s going to be there. Grandma and Grandpa Kent are driving in, your brothers are flying in. Your uncle Conner and Aunt M’Gann are coming in too. I even convince Bruce and Damian to come, you and Damian get along right?”

           You shrug “I haven’t had all that much contact with him, to be honest.”

           He nods, “I suppose that’s true, but he’s a good man, I think that you two would …”

           “I’m moving to London!” The words come out without your consent, and the look on his face makes you almost wish you could take them back. Almost

           He stares at you “I don’t understand.”

           “My college acceptance letters came in a few weeks ago. I got in everywhere I applied.”

           The smile that lights up your fathers face, makes your heart break even more “That’s amazing sweetheart, spectacular, but I don’t understand why you would say you were going to London when that’s the case. And why wait several weeks to tell us?”

           You take a deep breath “Because I applied to a music school in London. Very prestigious, only five percent of applicants get in, and I managed a full scholarship.”

           Your dad’s eyes narrow “But that’s not what we discussed, you were going to attend one of the three schools your brothers go to, so that there was someone to watch over you. Keep you safe.”

           You take a deep breath in an effort to stay calm “Dad, the guys go to some amazing schools, but none of them have the kind of program I need if I want to play professionally.”

           He just crosses his arms and says “But we agreed that you weren’t going to play professionally.”

           Your voice steadies “No, you decided that. You and the boys, and the league decided to keep me in this little protective box where I can’t be used against you, because I am apparently helpless.”

           Your dad just sighs “Y/N we’ve been over this, you’re in a vulnerable position because of who your family is.”

           You meet his gaze “Don’t you mean because of who I am?”

           “Y/N …”

           “Four kids, and I’m the only one without powers. I can’t fly, I’m not bullet proof, and I can’t shoot beams out of my eyes. Heck, I’m not even an investigative reporter, like mom. I’m the normal one, but there is absolutely nothing normal about my life. You’ve kept me in a box, like I’m veal. I always have to have someone watching me, heck, I’m eighteen and I still have to check in with you and mom, or my older brothers.”

           Your dad’s voice raises “You’re in constant danger because of what our family is. .”

           “I AM NOT A PART OF THIS FAMILY!” The statement takes both of you by surprise, and your dad’s expression turns to one of horror and sadness. You clear your throat “I’m the only one without powers, I have spent more collective time with my grandparents than with my parents. You and mom have always been gone, trying to save the world. And when the boys started showing signs of powers you put all your time and energy into training them. I became an after thought …”

           Your dad moves forward to hug you, and you step back, out of his reach He whispers your name “Y/N …”

           “You know nothing about me. You’ve never even heard me play. And it’s not just you dad, the guys have never heard me play, and mom, well mom is always traveling now.” There’s this silence before you say “I love you guys, I really do. I understand why you do what you do, and why the world comes before me, but at the same time, I have needs to. And I need this. I need this school, and this opportunity. An opportunity to find out who I am, and what’s best for me.”

           You take another few steps back “Grandma and Grandpa Kent already know, I told them months ago, and I’ve sent an email to mom. And I have no doubt that you’ll tell the boys.” Your phone buzzes in your pocket, and you know what that means “My flight leaves in three hours, and it takes an hour to get to the airport, which means I have to go.”

           He takes a step forward and you take another back, distance is your friend right now “I have to go to the school early to start setting things up. My dorm, classes, set up reservations for the piano, things like that.”

           “So this is it? You tell me and run?”

           You nod “You forget dad, I was never the superhero, I was never the brave one, I was never the strong one. I knew how things would go. The entire family would converge and try to keep me from going, and I would give in. But I can’t because I need this.”

           You allow yourself to walk towards him now, and in that moment, your father, Clark Kent, Superman, looks smaller than you’ve ever seen him.” You simply kiss his cheek and say “I’ll email you to let you know I’m safe. I love you daddy.”

           You don’t look back, and when you get to London you throw yourself into school. You throw yourself into figuring out exactly who you are. You exchange sporadic emails with your family, and not one demands your return. And for that you’re extremely grateful. On the night of your end of the year recital, you walk out on to the stage to take your place, and when you look out into the audience you see your family. You can’t help but smile as you sit down and play. And as your fingers glide across the keys, who you are shines through.