superman and the legion of superheroes

DC comics askance

1. “Duet” from the Flash or “Mayheim of the Music Meister” from Batman the Brave and the Bold?
2. Do you like the arrowverse? If so what’s your favorite show?
3. First comic read?
4. What introduced you to the DC universe? Was it a show, comic or movie?
5. Favorite character?
6. Favorite cannon ship?
7. Favorite non-cannon ship?
8. Pre-N52 or N52?
9. Rebirth or N52?
10. Death in the Family or Death of Superman?
11. Favorite live action movie?
12. Favorite animated movie?
13. DCEU or DCAU?
14. Favorite member of the trinity?
15. Dark trinity or trinity?
16. Outsiders or Titans?
17. Teen Titans or Young Just Us?
18. Favorite animated show?
19. Favorite superhero family?
20. Young justice(show) or Teen Titans(show)?
21. Do you watch Teen Titans Go?
22. Favorite Robin?
23. So you prefer Superman and Wonder Woman or Batman and Wonder Woman?
24. If you had total control what would you change?
25. Batgirl or oracle?
26. Whos your favorite batgirl?
27. Batgirl and the birds of Prey or Redhood and the Outlaws?
28. Favorite comic run?
29. Favorite comic artist?
30. Favorite comic writer?
31. Do you like the joker?
32. Who do you think is the most overused or overrated characters?
33. Batman the animated series or Superman the animated series?
34. Legion of Superheros or Batman Beyond?
36. Justice league or Justice league Unlimited?
37. The Batman or beware the Bat?
38. Who do you think is the most overlooked or underused character?
39. Do you watch Gotham?
40. Do you like marvel?
41. Jon kent or Damian Wayne?
42. Renee Montoya or Vic Sage
43. Kate Kane and Renee Montoya or Apollo and Midnighter?
44. Barry Allen or Wally West?
45. Kara Zor-El, Stephanie Brown or Cassie sandsmark?
46. Kord Industrues, Wayne Tech or Lex Corp?
47. If you could have any characters powers who’s would you have?
48. Favorite villain?
49. DC Bombshells, Injustice or Kingdom come?
50. Injustice or the Arkham Asylum?
51. Justice League or League of Assassins?

52. Are you excited about the upcoming titans show? What about young justice?
Superman Starter Pack

First and most importantly, before we go into petty commercial concerns, let’s remember the meaning of this day. Because friends, this is no ordinary day: this is Miracle Monday, the anniversary of Superman triumphing over no less than the biblical prince of darkness himself (or at least a respectable substitute), and it was so awesome that even though it was expunged from humanity’s collective consciousness, they still instinctively recognized the third Monday of May as a day of good cheer to be celebrated in Superman’s honor from now until the end of time.

I know I write plenty about Superman on here, but with as much as a pain as comics can be to get into, I’m sure at least some of those I’m lucky enough to have follow me haven’t been able to find an easy in for the character. Or maybe a follower-of-a-follower or friend-of-a-friend is looking for a reasonable place to start. So in the spirit of the season, I’ll toss on the (admittedly already pretty massive) pile of recommended starting points on Superman: ten stories in a recommended - but by no means strict - order that should, as a whole, give you a pretty decent idea of what Superman’s deal is and why you should care, all of which you should be able to find pretty easily on Comixology or a local bookstore/comic book shop. I’ll probably do a companion to this in September for Batman Day.

1. Superman: Birthright

What it’s about: It’s his origin. He gets rocketed to Earth from the doomed planet Krypton, he gets raised by farmers, he puts on tights to fight crime, he meets Lois Lane and Lex Luthor, he deals with Kryptonite, all the standard-issue Superman business.

Why you should read it: It does all that stuff better than anyone else. He’s had a few different takes on his origins over the years due to a series of reboots, another of those tellings is even further down the list, but the first major modern one pretty much hit the nail on the head first try. It toes the tricky line of humanizing him without making you forget that hey, he’s Superman, it’s high-action fun without skimping on the character, and if there’s any one story that does the best job of conveying why you should look at an invincible man-god all but beyond sin or death with no major inciting incident in his background as a likable, relatable character, this is it. Add in some of the best Lane and Luthor material out there, and it’s a no-brainer.

Further recommendations if you liked it: About a decade before writing Birthright, its author Mark Waid worked with Alex Ross on what ended up one of DC’s biggest comics ever, Kingdom Come, the story of a brutal near-future of out-of-control superheroes that ultimately narrowed down to being about Superman above all else, and one of his most popular and influential stories of all time at that. Years after Birthright he created Irredeemable, the story of a Superman pastiche named Plutonian gone murderously rogue and how he reached his breaking point, illustrating a lot of what makes Superman special by way of contrast.

(Since Superman’s had so many notable homage/analogue/pastiche/rip-off/whatever-you-want-to-call-it characters compared to other superheroes, often in very good stories, there’ll be a number of those stories on this list.)

2. Superman: Up, Up and Away

What: Ever seen Superman Returns? That, but good. Clark Kent’s been living and loving a normal life as a reporter and husband after a cosmic dust-up in one of DC’s event comics took Superman off the board for a year, but mounting threats demand his return to save Metropolis again, if he still can.

Why: If you’d rather skip the origin, this is as a good a place as you’ll find to jump onboard. Clark and Lois both get some solid characterization, a number of classic villains have solid screentime, there’s some interesting Kryptonian mythology sticking its head in without being too intrusive, a great overarching threat to Metropolis, and it captures how Superman’s powers work in a visceral sense better than almost anything else. If you just want a classic, pick-it-up-and-go Fun Superman Story, this is where to go.

Recommendations: If you liked this, you’ll probably be inclined to enjoy the rest of co-writer Geoff Johns’ run on Action Comics, including most popularly Legion of Superheroes and Brainiac, both with artist Gary Frank. Another series tapping into that classic Superman feeling pretty well - regardless of whether you enjoyed the original show or not - is Smallville: Season 11, showing the adventures of that series’ young Clark Kent once he finally becomes Superman. Currently, Peter Tomasi and Patrick Gleason’s run on the main Superman title under the banner of DC Rebirth is maintaining that feeling itself, properly introducing Jon Kent, Lois and Clark’s 10-year-old-son, as Superboy in what seems to be a permanent addition to the cast and mythology (though there’s some continuity hiccups there, even as they’re mostly kept to the background - for the first 20 issues Superman is a refugee from a previous continuity, don’t ask).

3. Superman: Secret Identity

What: He’s Clark Kent, an aspiring writer from a farm town in Kansas. Problem is he’s only named after the other guy, an ordinary teenager who’s put up with crap his whole life for being named after a comic book character in an ordinary world. But when he suddenly finds himself far closer to his namesake than he ever would have imagined, it becomes the journey of his life to find how to really be a Superman.

Why: The best ‘realistic’ Superman story by a long shot, this doesn’t sideline its heart in favor of pseudo-science justifications for what he can do, or the sociopolitical impact of his existence. He has the powers, he wears the costume to save people (though he never directly reveals himself to the world), and in-between he lives his life and learns what it means to be a good man. It’s quiet and sweet and deeply human, and probably one of the two or three best Superman comics period.

Recommendations: Superman: American Alien is probably as close as there’s been to taking this kind of approach to the ‘real’ Superman, showing seemingly minor and unconnected snippets from his life, from childhood to his early days in the costume, and how they unconsciously shaped him into the man he becomes. If you like the low-key, pastoral aesthetic, you might enjoy Superman for All Seasons, or the current title Supergirl: Being Super. If you’d like more of writer Kurt Busiek’s work, his much-beloved series Astro City - focusing on a different perspective in the superhero-stuffed metropolis in every story - opens with A Dream of Flying, set from the point of view of the Superman-like Samaritan, telling of his quiet sorrow of never being to fly simply for its own sake in a world of dangers demanding his attention.

4. Of Thee I Sing

What: Gotham hitman Tommy Monaghan heads to the roof of Noonan’s bar for a smoke. Superman happens to be there at the time. They talk.

Why: A lot of people call this the best Superman story of the 90s, and they’re not wrong. Writer Garth Ennis doesn’t make any bones about hating the superhero genre in general (as evidenced by their treatment in the rest of Hitman), but he has a sincere soft spot for Superman as an ideal of what we - and specifically Americans - are supposed to be, and he pours it all out here in a story of what it means for Superman to fail, and why he remains Superman regardless. It sells the idea that an unrepentant killer - even one only targeting ‘bad guys’ like Tommy - would unabashedly consider Superman his hero, and that’s no small feat.

Recommendations: If you read Hitman #34 and love it but don’t intend to check out the rest of the series (why? It’s amazing), go ahead and read JLA/Hitman, a coda to the book showing the one time Tommy got caught up in the Justice League’s orbit, and what happens when Superman learns the truth about his profession, culminating in a scene that sums up What Superman Is All About better than maybe any other story. If you appreciated the idea of a classically decent Superman in an indecent world, you might enjoy Al Ewing’s novel Gods of Manhattan (the middle of a loose pulp adventure trilogy with El Sombra and Pax Omega, which I’ve discussed in the past), starring Doc Savage and Superman analogue Doc Thunder warring with a fascistic new vigilante in a far different New York City.

5. Superman: Camelot Falls

What: On top of a number of other threats hitting Superman from all sides, he receives a prophecy from the wizard Arion, warning of a devastating future when mankind is faced with its ultimate threat; a threat it will be too weak to overcome due to Superman’s protection over the years, but will still only just barely survive without him. Will he abandon humanity to a new age of darkness, or try and fight fate to save them knowing it could lead to their ultimate extinction?

Why: From the writer of Secret Identity and co-writer of Up, Up and Away!, this is probably the best crack at the often-attempted “Would having Superman be around actually be a good thing for humanity in the long term?” story. Beyond having the courtesy of wrapping that idea up in a really solid adventure rather than having everyone solemnly ruminate for the better part of a year, it comes at it from an angle that doesn’t feel like cheating either logically or in terms of the characters, and it’s an extremely underrated gem.

Recommendations: For the same idea tackled in a very different way, there’s the much better-known Superman: Red Son, showing the hero he would have become growing up in the Soviet Union rather than the United States; going after similar ideas is the heartfelt Superman: Peace on Earth. The rest of Kurt Busiek’s time on the main Superman title was great too, even if this stood easily as the centerpiece; his other trades were Back In Action, Redemption, The Third Kryptonian, and Shadows Linger. Speaking of underrated gems, Gail Simone’s run on Action Comics from around the same time with John Byrne was also great, collected in Strange Attractors. And since the story opens with an excellent one-shot centered around his marriage to Lois, I have to recommend From Krypton With Love if you can track it down in Superman 80-Page Giant #2, and Thom Zahler’s fun Lois-and-Clark style webcomic Love and Capes.

6. Superman Adventures

What: A spinoff of Superman: The Animated Series, this quietly chugged along throughout the latter half of the 90s as the best of the Superman books at the time.

Why: Much as stories defining his character and world are important, the bread and butter of Superman is just regular old fun comics, and there’s no better place to go than here for fans of any and all ages. Almost all of its 66 issues were at least pretty fun, but by far most notable were two runs in particular - Scott McCloud, the guy who would go on to literally write the book on the entire medium in Understanding Comics, handled the first year, and Mark Millar prior to his breakout success wrote a number of incredibly charming and sincere Superman stories here, including arguably the best Luthor story in How Much Can One Man Hate?, and a full comic on every page in 22 Stories In A Single Bound.

Recommendations: Superman has an embarrassment of riches when it comes to runs of just plain fun comics. For the youngest in your family, Superman Family Adventures might just be what you’re looking for. Supergirl: Cosmic Adventures in the Eighth Grade would fit on your shelf very well next to Superman Adventures. Superman: Secret Origin, while not the absolute best take on his early days, has some real charm and would be an ideal introduction for younger readers that won’t talk down to them in the slightest, and that you’ll probably like yourself (especially since it seems to be the ‘canon’ Superman origin again). If you’re interested in something retro, The Superman Chronicles cover his earliest stories from the 30s and 40s, and Showcase Presents: Superman collects many of his most classic adventures from the height of his popularity in the 50s and 60s. Age of the Sentry and Alan Moore’s Supreme would also work well. For slightly older kids (i.e. middle school), they might get a kick out of Mark Millar and Lenil Yu’s Superior, or What’s So Funny About Truth, Justice, and the American Way? And finally, for just plain fun Superman runs, I can’t ignore the last year of Joe Casey’s much-overlooked time on The Adventures of Superman.

7. Superman vs. Lex Luthor

What: Exactly what it says on the tin: a collection of 12 Luthor stories from his first appearance to the early 21st century.

Why: Well, he’s Superman’s biggest enemy, that’s why, and even on his own is one of the best villains of all time. Thankfully, this is an exceptionally well-curated collection of his greatest hits; pouring through this should give you more than a good idea of what makes him tick.

Recommendations: While he has a number of great showings in Superman-centric comics, his two biggest solo acts outside of this would be Brian Azzarello and Lee Bermejo’s Luthor (originally titled Lex Luthor: Man of Steel) and Paul Cornell’s run on Action Comics, where Lex took over the book for about a year. Also, one of Superman’s best writers, Elliot S! Maggin, contributed a few stories here - he’s best known for his brilliant Superman novels Last Son of Krypton and the aforementioned Miracle Monday, and he wrote a number of other great tales I picked some highlights from in another article.

8. Grant Morrison’s Action Comics

What: Spanning years, it begins in a different version of Superman’s early days, where an as-yet-flightless Clark Kent in a t-shirt and jeans challenged corrupt politicians, grappling with the public’s reaction to its first superhero even as his first true menace approaches from the stars. Showing his growth over time into the hero he becomes, he slowly realizes that his life has been subtly influenced by an unseen but all-powerful threat, one that in the climax will set Superman’s greatest enemies’ against him in a battle not just for his life, but for all of reality.

Why: The New 52 period for Superman was a controversial one at best, and I’d be the last to deny it went down ill-advised roads and made outright bone-stupid decisions. But I hope if nothing else this run is evaluated in the long run the way it deserves; while the first arc is framed as something of a Superman origin story, it becomes clear quickly that this is about his life as a whole, and his journey from a cocksure young champion of the oppressed in way over his head, to a self-questioning godling unsure of the limits of his responsibilities as his powers increase, and finally an assured, unstoppable Superman fighting on the grandest cosmic scale possible against the same old bullies. It gives him a true character arc without undermining his essential Superman-ness, and by the end it’s a contender for the title of the biggest Superman story of all.

Recommendations: Outside of this, Greg Pak’s runs on Action Comics and Batman/Superman, and Tom Taylor/Robson Rocha’s 3-issue Batman/Superman stint, as well as Scott Snyder, Jim Lee and Dustin Nguyen’s blockbuster mini Superman Unchained, are the best of the New 52 era. If you’re looking for more wild cosmic Superman adventure stories, Grant Morrison’s Superman Beyond is a beautiful two-part adventure (it ties in to his event comic Final Crisis but largely works standalone), and Joe Casey’s Mr. Majestic was a largely great set of often trippy cosmic-scale adventure comics with its Superman-esque lead. For something a little more gonzo, maybe try the hilariously bizarre Coming of the Supermen by Neal Adams. And while his role in it is relatively minor, if we’re talking cosmic Superman-related epics, Jack Kirby’s Fourth World has to be mentioned - it’ll soon be reissued in omnibus format to coincide with the Justice League movie, since many of its concepts made it in there.

9. Superman: Whatever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow?

What: More than just the title story, DC issued a collection of all three of Watchmen writer Alan Moore’s Superman stories: For The Man Who Has Everything, where Superman finds himself trapped in his idea of his ideal life while Batman, Wonder Woman and Robin are in deadly danger in the real world, Jungle Line, where a deliriously ill and seemingly terminal Superman finds help in the most unexpected place, and Whatever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow?, Moore’s version of the final Superman story.

Why: Dark Superman stories are a tricky tightrope to walk - go too far and you invalidate the core his world is built around - but Moore’s pretty dang good at his job. Whatever Happened you should wait to read until you’ve checked out some Superman stories from the 1960s first since it’s very much meant as a contrast to those, but For The Man Who Has Everything is an interesting look at Superman’s basic alienation (especially in regards to his characterization in that period of his publication history) with a gangbuster final fight, and Jungle Line is a phenomenal Superman horror story that uncovers some of his rawest, most deeply buried fears.

Recommendations: There are precious few other dark Superman stories that can be considered any real successes outside a few mentioned among other recommendations; the closest I can think of is Superman: For Tomorrow, which poses some interesting questions framed by gorgeous art, but has a reach tremendously exceeding its grasp. Among similar characters though, there are some real winners; Moore’s own time on Miracleman was one of the first and still one of the most effective looks at what it would mean for a Superman-like being to exist in the real world, and the seminal novel Superfolks, while in many ways of its time, was tremendously and deservedly influential on generations of creators. Moore had another crack at the end of a Superman-like figure in his Majestic one-shot, and the Change or Die arc of Warren Ellis’ run on Stormwatch (all of which is worth reading) presented a powerful, bittersweet look at a superman’s attempt at truly changing the world for the better.

10. All-Star Superman

What: Superman rescues the first manned mission to the sun, sabotaged by Lex Luthor. His powers have reached greater heights than ever from the solar overexposure, but it’s more than his cells can handle: he’s dying, and Lex has won at last. This is what Superman does with his last year of life.

Why: I put this at the bottom since it works better the more you like Superman, but if you’re only going to read one story on this list, this one has to be it. It’s one of the best superhero stories period, and it’s everything that’s wistful and playful and sad and magical and wonderful about Superman in one book.

Recommendations: If you’re interested in the other great “Death of Superman” story, skip the 90s book and go to co-creator Jerry Siegel and Curt Swan’s 60s ‘Imaginary Story’, also one of the best Superman stories ever, and particularly one of Luthor’s best showings. If you got a kick out of the utopian ‘Superman fixes everything’ feel of a lot of it, try The Amazing Story of Superman-Red and Superman-Blue! The current Supergirl title by Steve Orlando seems to be trying to operate on a pretty similar wavelength, and is definitely the best thing coming out of the Superman family of books right now. The recent Adventures of Superman anthology series has a number of creators try and do their own ‘definitive’ Superman stories, often to great results. And Avengers 34.1 starring Hyperion by Al Ewing and Dale Keown taps into All-Star’s sense of an elevated alien perspective paired with a deep well of humanity to different but still moving results.

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DC/Looney Tunes 100-Page Spectacular (2017-) #1

The miniseries from 2000 that first united the best-known heroes from two very different universes is back in a single issue collection featuring SUPERMAN/BUGS BUNNY #1-4! All the Looney Tunes are making their way into the DC Universe thanks to Mr. Mxyzptlk and the Do-Do—and only Superman stands a chance of keeping the universes apart…with the help of a certain wascally wabbit!  - $7.99

Legion of Super Heroes/Bugs Bunny Special (2017-) #1

The Legion of Super-Heroes always thought they had taken their inspiration from the 21st Century’s Superboy. But when they try to bring that hero into their future time, the team discovers to their surprise the caped champion isn’t who—or even what—they expected! And the bonus Looney Tunes backup story features DC characters with story and art by Juan Ortiz!

Available on June 14 2017 - $4.99

Lobo/Road Runner Special (2017-) #1

Wile E. Coyote travels to the far reaches of space to hire Lobo to hunt down and kill his greatest nemesis of all time, the Road Runner. And when the Coyote and Lobo are after him, the Road Runner knows if they catch him—he’s through. And the bonus Looney Tunes backup story features DC characters with story and art by Bill Morrison! - $4.99

Available on June 21 2017 - $4.99

Martian Manhunter/Marvin the Martian Special (2017-) #1

Martian Manhunter tries to halt Marvin the Martian’s determination for world domination. J’onn is conflicted with his own Martian identity as he attempts to stop the hapless, determined Marvin from blowing Earth to bits in order to gain a clear view of Venus. And the bonus Looney Tunes backup story features DC characters written by Jim Fanning with art by John Loter!

Available on June 14 2017 - $4.99

Wonder Woman/Tasmanian Devil Special (2017-) #1

Not since the twelve labors of Hercules has a Greek warrior faced as great a danger and as destructive a peril as the Tasmanian Devil! And the bonus Looney Tunes backup story features DC characters with story by Tony Bedard and art by Ben Caldwell!

Available on June 21 2017 - $4.99

Batman/Elmer Fudd Special (2017-) #1

After a chance meeting with billionaire Bruce Wayne, Elmer Fudd’s obsession quickly escalates into stalking Batman through the dark alleys and high-class social settings of Gotham City. Welcome to Bat Season! And the bonus Looney Tunes backup story features DC characters written by Tom King and artwork by Byron Vaughns.

Available on June 28 2017 - $4.99

Jonah Hex/Yosemite Sam Special (2017-) #1

When miner Yosemite Sam strikes it rich, word gets out as everyone comes gunning for his wealth! To protect himself and his new riches, he hires bounty hunter Jonah Hex-—but the man protecting him may be his worst nightmare! And the bonus Looney Tunes backup story features DC characters written by Bill Matheny and artwork by Dave Alvarez.

Available on June 28 2017 - $4.99

This and the Mighty Mouse are soooooooooooooooooooo disappointing. With the first page of the Mighty Mouse and the variant covers of the DC/Looney Tunes Specials, the comics companies are saying, Here is the cartoon comics you really want, for one image, but we are going to give you this lameness for the rest of the issue instead. 

All of the DC Hanna Barbera Annuals A-Stories were great. Snagglepuss was good but short. Jetsons was fine, but I wish had character designs they did turn arounds with. Top Cat was disturbing. With bad DC character designs for Batman and Catwoman. Ruff and Reddy was fine. So these might not suck, but…

What if comic companies were not afraid of Cartoon Comics? 

Things There Should Be More Of In The Superhero Genre
  1. Suitable uniforms for female characters.
  2. More LGBT+ characters overall, and the pros and cons that come with that.
  3. Superhero stalkers that are dangerous to the hero’s health.
  4. Heroes that deal with trauma and PTSD, because you do not get over your parents’ death in a week.
  5. Relationships realistically causing problems for missions.
  6. Realistic relationships in general.
  7. Badass disabled characters.
  8. Characters who deal with mental health issues that are not for humour or depression.
  9. Diversity, both in the human sense, and alien sense (because aliens probably don’t look all that humanoid).
  10. Income, juggling the cost of damages, problems with insurance, medical, and taxes.
  11. Actually having to balance a life and the hero life.
  12. The protests and nitpicking over every action they make.
  13. Education.
  14. Teenage hormones causing problems.
  15. If set in modern times, why have super advanced technology we know we don’t have.
  16. Guilt of mistakes.
  17. Having doubts about doing the right thing, or even what the right things.
  18. Having an ongoing debate about the “no killing” policy.
  19. Heroes who become evil or villains who become good for the rights reasons.
  20. Villains who don’t have the villain aesthetic, who are flamboyant and fantastically gay.
  21. People in the grey area between heroes and villains.
  22. Sexual health that actually helps.
  23. People who die stay dead.
  24. People who get injured take time to heal.
  25. The public actually helping when problems happen instead of being a nuisance.
  26. Leaders are chosen on “raw talent” rather than practicality of the situation.
  27. The violence of the heroes affecting the public.
  28. No one can deal with everything at once, not even if they had a big team.
  29. Social media.
  30. Not everything has a happy ending sadly.
  31. Heroes are not always heroic.
  32. Female characters are still as numerous as male characters, with just as many being more powerful or even brutal than there male characters.
  33. Diverse body types and shapes.
  34. Biology as normal, teenage characters who change and age, senior heroes in their 70s with equally strong powers.
  35. Not everyone has a tragic backstory.
  36. Young people have medical problems.
  37. Children learning how to use their powers and being potentially dangerous as a result.
  38. Heroes who are parents, or become parents.
  39. Addictions problems.
  40. Not all heroes are from working class and up families.
  41. Sometimes heroes are the “everyday heroes”.
  42. Secret identities are hard to hide, like super hard, like it’s not as simple as glasses or a simple voice change.
  43. If someone has a family that they were not raised with, it is not uncommon for them to resent or even just not bond with their original family, and they may not feel any longing for their “lose”.
  44. America is not the be all and end all of the world. There, I said it.
  45. You cannot solve all the world’s problems because of political and societal issues. It’s never that cut and dry.
  46. Continuity being a thing, have a problem remain problems throughout. Issues rarely go away because people forget. This goes to positive.
  47. Hobbies. The wider the variety the better.
  48. Have heroes get worn down by their duties, to the point they think or actually quit.
All of the Wonder Women!

So i saw someone on twitter do one of these and i thought i’d do one for Tumblr after seeing the Wonder Woman film the other day.

Animation/Video Games 

Susan Eisenberg

  • Justice League (2001-2004)
  • Justice League Unlimited (2004-2006)
  • Superman/Batman: Apocalypse (2010)
  • DC Universe Online (2011)
  • Justice League: Doom (2012)
  • Injustice: Gods Among Us (2013)
  • Injustice 2 (2017) 

Grey DeLisle

  • JLA Adventures: Trapped in Time (2014)
  •  Lego DC Super Heroes: Justice League - Attack of the Legion of Doom (2015)
  • DC Superhero Girls (2015- Present)
  • DC Superhero Girls: Hero of the Year (2016)
  • DC Superhero Girls: Superhero High (2016)
  • Lego DC Comics Super Heroes: Justice League - Cosmic Clash (2016)
  • Lego DC Comics Superheros: Justice League - Gotham City Breakout (2016)
  • DC Superhero Girls: Intergalactic Games 

Rosario Dawson 

  • Justice League: Throne of Atlantis (2015)
  • Justice League vs. Teen Titans (2016)
  • Justice League Dark (2017)

Vanessa Marshall 

  • Justice League: Crisis on Two Earths (2010)
  • Justice League: The Flashpoint Paradox (2013)

Shannon Farnon - Super Friends (1973-1981)

Lucy Lawless - Justice League: The Final Frontier (2008)

Michelle Monaghan - Justice League: War (2014)

Keri Russell - Wonder Woman (2009)

Vicki Lewis - Batman: The Brave and the Bold (2008-2011)

Maggie Q - Young Justice (2010 - Present)

Rachel Kimsey - Justice League Action (2016 - Present)

Live Action

Cathy Lee Crosby - Wonder Woman (1974) (TV Movie)

Lynda Carter - Wonder Woman (1975-1979)

Gal Gadot 

  • Batman V Superman: Dawn of Justice (2016)
  • Wonder Woman (2017)
  • Justice League (2017)

Almost

Megan Gale - Justice League Mortal (2008)

Adrianne Palicki - Wonder Woman (2011) (TV Movie)


I know i missed some of the more obscure animated appearances but feel free to add them if you want :)  

The Chronological Superman 1962:

The Legion of Super-Heroes gets its own feature beginning with Adventure Comics vol.1 No.300. While the Legion will eventually be known as one of the great, long-running soap operas in superherodom, its early adventures are one-offs with a tendency to be strongly Superboy-focused. 

For instance, the villain faced here – Urthlo – turns out to be a lookalike robot created by Lex Luthor and powered by “Hate Tapes,” appearing in the 30th Century to destroy Superboy and his futuristic pals…

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Legion of Super Heroes/Bugs Bunny Special (2017-) #1

The Legion of Super-Heroes always thought they had taken their inspiration from the 21st Century’s Superboy. But when they try to bring that hero into their future time, the team discovers to their surprise the caped champion isn’t who—or even what—they expected! And the bonus Looney Tunes backup story features DC characters with story and art by Juan Ortiz! - $4.99

Each book has the DC Version and the Looney Tunes version and both are GREAT!

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I have been thinking a lot on the Alexis as a friend possibility I mentioned in my review of Legacy towards the end (here), so I decided to go ahead and start making the AU.

At the space ball park, Superman invites her to HQ afterwards, which Alexis agrees to. Brainy is not happy at first - especially because she keeps trying to look around in his lab, but after she helps find the scavengers Scavengers by giving him stuff that may or may not be illegal for hacking purposes, he warms up and let’s her take him and Superman to get sushi during patrol.

They quickly become science buds.

EDIT: I FORGOT SUPERMAN’S CAPE. IM A MONSTER

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Superman Throughout Animation