superbrothers sword & sworcery ep

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Pixel art games aren’t retro, they’re the future
It’s clear that there’s more going on with most of these games than simple revivalism. “Our goals are never to rely on nostalgia as a way to create positive reactions to our art,” says Nathan Vella, co-founder and president of Super Time Force and Superbrothers: Sword and Sworcery EP (above) developer Capybara Games. “Certainly, nostalgia is a factor with pixel art, but it isn’t the beginning nor the end of the style. We believe that pixel art is just that —­ an art style,­ no different than realistic 3D or traditional 2D. It can be interpreted and manipulated differently by every artist, resulting in wildly different aesthetics under the same general umbrella.”

Pixel art games aren’t retro, they’re the future

The best game on the Xbox One right now is the frantic, blocky side-scroller Super Time Force (above), and you could make the same case for TowerFall: Ascension on the PlayStation 4. Both of these use pixel art — the chunky 2D graphical style that harkens back to the ’80s and early ’90s — and the upshot is that it’s okay for new games to look old again.

But why has this happened? Have pixels proved themselves as the building blocks of a legitimate art form, or is it all just a retro fad?

“Certainly, nostalgia is a factor with pixel art, but it isn’t the beginning nor the end of the style. We believe that pixel art is just that —­ an art style,­ no different than realistic 3D or traditional 2D. It can be interpreted and manipulated differently by every artist, resulting in wildly different aesthetics under the same general umbrella,” says Nathan Vella, co-founder and president of Super Time Force and Superbrothers: Sword and Sworcery EP developer Capybara Games

(Read More at The Verge.)