sunerosewagner

A limited amount of #gigposters by #gigart is now available at store.gigart.com for the band #TheRaveonettes and their past show in #SanDiego at #TheCasbah. #poster #illustration #drawing #instagood #instaart #indieband #sunerosewagner #sharinfoo #denmark #peahi @casbahsandiego #thecasbah #switchblade #beach #silkscreen #doodle #silhouette

Day 3 - #Weapon on the cover - #septembervinylchallenge one of my favorites from last year… #nowplaying #TheRaveonettes #PeAhi #2014 #BeatDiesRecords #vinyl #vinylbox #vinylrules #vinyligclub #vinylcommunity #vinylcollection #nowspinning #onmyturntable #SuneRoseWagner #SharinFoo Produced by #JustinMeldalJohnsen. Great review lifted from #consequenceofsound.net by #SashaGeffen published 7.31.2014. The Raveonettes begin their seventh studio album with the same beat that opened The Doors’ first. The first lyrics that follow are “I have sand in my shoes and death on my mind.” If that’s not enough to situate you, the Danish duo (who now reside in Los Angeles) helpfully named the record after the north shore of Maui. Pe’ahi is a Pacific album through and through, and it doesn’t stop reveling in buzzed-out West Coast noir until it wraps things up with a tune called “Summer Ends”, in case you had any lingering hopes that anything gold could stay.

Dropped onto the world Beyoncé-style (or maybe it’s Wolfmother-style) the same day as its announcement, Pe’ahi marks a change in dynamics for a band that had more or less settled into a continuous stream of static. For their last three albums, Sune Rose Wagner and Sharin Foo worked a reliable assembly line of scuzzy dream pop songs bunched together under faux vintage, black-and-white album covers. Now, they present their latest with an aquamarine splash, even though the subject matter remains as grisly as ever.

Early on, Pe’ahi features one of The Raveonettes’ strongest moments of contrast to date. “Sisters” cuts from blissful walls of noise to clean harp strums while cruising a vintage West Coast hip-hop beat. It’s the first time I can remember the band playing around with silence instead of trying to cram as much noise into one place as possible. But aside from a brief foray into bells on “When Night Is Almost Done”, it’s really the only instance of experiment among the album’s offerings. Everything else wears the same thick coat of fuzz they’ve been messing with for more than a decade, the same digital decay that now ostensibly obscures some of the band’s most deeply personal lyrics.